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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 

TOWN 
REPORT 




CHELMSFORD 



1979 



IN MEMORIAM 



VERNON R. FLETCHER 

Town Counsel 1959 - 1965 

Moderator 1959 - 1960 

School Committee 1951 - 1957 

State Representative 1956 - 1966 



FRANK H. HARDY 

Cemetery Commissioner 1950 - 1974 

PHILIP J. M c CORMACK 

Treasurer and Tax Collector 1972 - 1979 

FRANK J. WOTJAS 

Dog Officer 1967 - 1979 

WARREN WRIGHT 

Board of Assessors 1923 - 1971 



Cover art courtesy of the Chelmsford Cultural Council 
and the Artist, William Hynes 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1979 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population, 1975: 

Density, 1970: 

Assessed Valuation 1979 

Tax Rate: 

United States Senators in Congress: 

5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court: 

16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 

Building Inspector 

Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 

Children's House 

McKay Library 

School Superintendent 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Clerk 

Tax Collector & Treasurer 

Veterans Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsborough on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. It 

is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, 

and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

3 1,749 

1,394 persons per square mile 

$275,171,395 (Real Estate) 

$ 10,738,335 (Personal Property) 

$53 

James M. Shannon, Lawrence 
Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford Precincts 1,12 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday 1 :00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00-8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Saturday in April 

Last Monday in April 

Mondays 7:30 p.m. 

Every other Tuesday 8:00 p.m. 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wed. every month 

7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday every month 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tues. every month 

7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Mon. every month 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday every month 



12 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Hall 
High School 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
1 Smith Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
(Term Expires-1981) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
(Term Expires-1981) 



Board of Selectmen 



William R. Murphy 
Arnold J. Lovering 
PaulC. Hart 
Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 
John W. Carson 
Bonita Towle 
Bradford O. Emerson 



Term expired 1979 
Term expired 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1982 
Term expires 1982 



Treasurer & Tax Collector 

Philip J. McCormack (Deceased) 

James R. Doukszewicz (Temporary Appt.) 

(Term expires-Next ATE) 



Ruth K. Delaney 
Janet Lombard 
Julian H. Zabierek 



Board of Assessors 



Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1982 



Cemetery Commissioners 

Gerald L. Hardy Term expires 1980 

ArthurJ. Colmer Term expires 1981 

Everett V. Olsen Term expires 1982 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 



Ruth K. Delaney 

Richard L. Monahan 

Robert A. Sheridan (Resigned) 

Robert L. Hughes 

Pamela Turnbull 

Claude A. Harvey 



Board of Health 



PaulJ. Canniff 
Peter Dulchinos 
Paul F. McCarthy 



Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1982 
Term expires 1983 
Term expires 1983 
Term expires 1980 



Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1982 



Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational 
School District 

Jay M. Knox 
Randolph W. Brumagim 
Donald P. Ayer 
Louis E. Kelly 



Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1982 



Park Commissioners 

Bradford O. Emerson Term expired 1979 

J. Joan Schenk (Resigned) Term expires 1980 

Eileen Duffy (Appointed) Term expires 1980 

Arthur Bennett Term expires 1981 

Robert L. Wetmore Term expires 1982 



Carolyn Fenn 
Ann McCarthy 
Paul F. Bartel 
Eugene Gilet 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 
H.R.Johnson, Jr. 
Charles A. Parlee 
Rosalind M. Boyle 



Planning Board 



Term expired 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1982 
Term expires 1982 
Term expires 1982 



School Committee 

Stanley W. Norkunas Term expires 1980 

Kenneth Taylor (Appointed) Term expires 1980 

Carol C. Clcven Term expires 1981 

John W. Peters Term expires 1981 

Myra Silver Term expires 1982 

William K. Sharpley, Jr. Resigned 

Sewer Commissioners 

MatthewJ. Doyle Term expired 1979 

Charles L. Wcavecr Term expires 1980 

DennisJ. Ready Term expires 1981 

Burton A. Segall Term expires 1982 

Trustees of Public Libraries 



James M. Geary 


Term expired 1979 


Dennis E. McHugh 


Term expires 1980 


Brenda M. McDermott 


Term expires 1980 


Elizabeth McCarthy 


Term expires 1981 


Dr. Howard K. Moore 


Term expires 1981 


James W. Cooper 


Term expires 1982 


Roger P. Welch 


Term expires 1982 


Constable 




William E. Spcnce 


Term expires 1980 


Tree Warden 




Donald P. Gray 


Term expires 1981 



Varney Playground Commissioners 
(Elected at Town Meeting) 

Bernard Battle Term expires 1980 

HarryJ. Ayottc Term expires 1981 

Robert C. McManimon Term expires 1982 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



At the Board's Organizational Meeting on April 9, 
1979, following the Annual Town Election, Paul C. Hart 
was elected Chairman of the Board, Joseph B. Shanahan, 
Jr. was elected Vice-Chairman, and John W. Carson was 
elected Clerk. Two new members joining the Board were 
Bonita A. Towle, Chelmsford's first woman Selectman, 
and Bradford O. Emerson. 

Highlights of the year's activities are as follows: 

January of 1979 was a month for personnel changes 
within the Police Department. James Greska was named 
Acting Police Chief, replacing the retiring Chief Ger- 
mann, Walter Edwards was named Acting Deputy Chief, 
and Sergeant Raymond McKeon became the depart- 
ment's Police Prosecutor. The new year was also started 
off by signing the first labor contract with Town Hall 
employees. 

January brought us another eventful winter weather- 
wise. On Thursday, January 25, at 11:30 AM a state of 
emergency was declared by the Selectmen due to the 
severe flooding in the Central Square area of town. The 
Auxiliary Police and Civil Defense were on duty until 
11:30 PM that evening, at which time the water began to 
recede. 

The following streets were flooded and impassable: 
Temi, Sandra, Algonquin, Summer, Warren Ave., Mill 
Rd., Turnpike Rd., Billerica Rd., High St., Hunt Rd., 
Garrison Rd., Tyngsboro Rd., Brick Kiln Rd., Perham 
St., and Central Square. Mr. Bienvenu was requested to 
inspect the roadway in Central Square to ascertain its 
safety, and after his inspection, the road was opened to 
motor vehicle traffic at 10 PM on Thursday, January 25. 

By Friday morning, January 26, 1979, only Turnpike 
Road was still under water. The Fire and Highway 



Departments were on duty all day Friday and Saturday 
pumping residences and businesses in the Central Square 
area. As late as January 29 many residences and busi- 
nesses were still without electrical power. 

The Selectmen transferred McFarlin "B" Building to 
the Housing Authority in February for the purpose of 
renovating it into elderly housing. When the question of a 
Merrimack River bridge arose, the Selectmen voted in 
favor of the Wood Street route. They also voted to keep 
Police Department appointments under the Civil Service 
system . 

Beginning in April the Selectmen's meetings were 
opened with the Salute to the Flag. During May the In- 
dustrial Development Commission was revived by the 
Selectmen to aid industrial expansion within Chelmsford. 
Selectman Shanahan also had the honor of being admit- 
ted to practice law before the United States Supreme 
Court. 

In June the Selectmen finished out the 1979 fiscal year 
by appointing James Doukszewicz as Town Treasurer/ 
Tax Collector, replacing the late Philip McCormack. 
The Cable TV Committee, after much study and investi- 
gation into the subject of cable television, invited pro- 
posals from private cable companies. We were also pleas- 
ed to witness the Northern Middlesex Area Commission's 
release of a program for the improvement of the Vinal 
Square area. 

The State-funded Salt Storage Shed, located at the 
Swain Pond Landfill, was completed in August. Also, a 
full-time Recreation Director was hired by the Town to 
better coordinate recreation activities. During September 
Mrs. Evelyn Haines resigned as the Selectmen's Ad- 
ministrative Assistant after 6 years of service to the Town. 



During October the Selectmen began to discuss the 
merits of having the municipal rubbish collection and 
removal done by an outside, private contractor rather 
than by the Town. They also reaffirmed their opposition 
to any but the Wood Street route for the proposed Mer- 
rimack River Bridge. 

December began our virtually snowless winter. The 
Selectmen publicly expressed their displeasure with the 
method in which the State Legislature had enacted its 
Halloween pay raises for itself and other State officials. 
They also accepted the bid by Northeast Development 
Corporation for the purchase of the Quessy School. After 
reviewing numerous resumes and interviewing several 
final candidates, the Selectmen named Norman E. 
Thidemann as Acting Administrative Assistant. 

Drainage work, including new pipes and catch basins, 
was completed by the Highway Department on Grove 
Street, Perham Street, Montview Road, Ruthellen Road, 
High Street, Byam Road, Mill Road, Westford Street, 
Glenn Avenue, Warren Avenue, Dalton Road, Sands 
Place, Hugo Lane, Ideal Avenue, and Wotton Street. 
Private contractors completed similar drainage work on 
Jessie Road, Lauderdale Road, Gail Street, Warren 
Avenue, Luan Circle, Longview Drive, Bridge Street, 
Bartlett Street and Southgate Road. 

During 1979 the Police Department received a grant 
from the Governor's Highway Safety Bureau for the pur- 
chase of a motorcycle with radar unit. The department, 
in an effort to make the Town streets safer for both 
pedestrians and motorists, issued more traffic citations 
than in any previous year and began a vigorous enforce- 
ment of the Town By-Law prohibiting parking in 
designated fire lanes. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Middlesex 
County Selectmen's Association, the Middlesex County 
Advisory Board, the Northern Middlesex Area Commis- 
sion, and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. In- 
dividual Selectmen also served as liaisons between the 
Board of Selectmen and various town and regional 
boards and commissions during the year. 

Due to the fact that National and State legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board 
maintained constant contact with Congressman 
Shannon's office as well as with Senator Carol Amick and 
State Representative Bruce Freeman. The Selectmen 
wish to express their gratitude to Congressman Shannon, 
Senator Amick, and Representative Freeman for their 
help and cooperation during the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford, wish to express their sincere gratitude to the 
various Town boards and committees for their accom- 
plishments during the past year. It should be 
remembered that these boards and committees are com- 
posed of unpaid volunteers who take many long hours out 
of their free time to work on issues and projects that 
benefit the Town of Chelmsford. 



DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 
BUREAU OF ACCOUNTS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824 

Dear Members: 

We have examined the financial statements of the 
various funds and the general long-term debt group of 
accounts of the Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts as of 
June 30, 1978, and for the year then ended as listed in the 
foregoing table of contents. Our examination was made 
in accordance with generally accepted auditing stan- 
dards, and accordingly included such tests of the accoun- 
ting records and other auditing procedures as we con- 
sidered necessary in the circumstances. 

The accompanying financial statements have been 
prepared in accordance with the provisions set forth by 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and do not represent either the financial position or 
results of operation presented in accordance with 
generally accepted accounting principles. The basis of 
accounting utilized in formulating the Town of Chelms- 
ford's financial statements and the departures from 
generally accepted accounting principles are disclosed in 
the accompanying notes to financial statements. 

In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements 
as of June 30, 1978 and for the year then ended present 
fairly the information contained therein, in conformity 
with the provisions of the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, applied on a consistent basis. 

The accompanying supplemental information is not 
necessary for a fair presentation of the financial 
statements, but is presented as additional analytical data. 
This information has been subjected to such tests and 
other auditing procedures applied in the examination of 
the financial statements mentioned above and, in our 
opinion, is fairly stated in all material respects in relation 
to the financial statements taken as a whole. 

In connection with our examination, we performed 
tests of compliance with the Revenue Sharing and Anti- 
recession Fiscal Assistance Acts and regulations as re- 
quired by Section II. C. 3. and III.C.3. of the Audit Guide 
and Standards for Revenue. Sharing and Antirecession 
Fiscal Assistance Fund Recipients (Guide) issued by the 
Office of Revenue Sharing, U.S. Department of the 
Treasury and compared the data on Bureau of Census 
Form RS-9 to records of the Town of Chelmsford as re- 
quired by Section II. C. 4. of the "Guide." 

Based on these procedures, we noted no difference bet- 
ween Census data on Form RS-9 and records of the Town 
of Chelmsford for the year ended June 30, 1978 but our 
review did disclose the following instance of noncom- 
pliance with regulations: 



Revenue Sharing 

Section II.C.3K (iv) A notice had not been published in 
a newspaper of general circulation or by alternative 
means stating that a summary of the enacted budget was 
available for public inspection within 30 days of its enact- 
ment. 

Section II.C.3L (viii) No formal policy exists concern- 
ing non-discriminatory action employment. 

Section III.C.3F (i) Use of funds report not published. 

Very truly yours, 

Edward G. McCann, Jr. 

Director, Bureau of Accounts 

Department of Revenue 

March 23, 1979 

A copy of the full Audit Report is on file at the Town 
Clerk's Office and may be viewed on the premises at any 
time during the Business Hours. 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth D. Zamanakos, Ass't Town Clerk 

LICENSES AND VITAL RECORDS 



Sporting 
Licenses 

1426 



Dog 
Licenses 

2330 



Kennel 
Licenses 

13 



Marriage 
Intentions 

284 



Recorded 
Mortgages, etc. 

500 



Births 
(Incomplete) 

300 



Marriages 
352 



Deaths 
320 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

February 1, 1979 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Auditorium on Thursday evening, the first day of 
Februry, 1979 at 7:30 o'clock, then and there to act upon 
the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the following resolution: 

"Resolved that the Board of Health of the Town of 
Chelmsford be advised that the Town approves of 
their current policy to refuse to issue new licenses to 
authorize the establishment of a business of 
massage." or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
balance of $270,786.00 from "Loans Authorized" as ap- 
proved under Article 22 of the Annual Town Meeting 
held March 12, 1973. Said Article authorized borrowing 
of $950,000.00 for the reconstruction of Crystal Lake and 
only the sum of $679,214.00 of required borrowing was 
necessary to complete this project; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to 
Section 9 of Chapter 258, Massachusetts General Laws, as 
inserted by Chapter 512 of the Acts of 1978, to transfer 
from the Reserve Fund the sum of Twelve Thousand Five 
Hundred ($12,500.00) Dollars to effect insurance pro- 



viding indemnity for each officer and employee of the 
Town, including the school department, from personal 
financial loss and expense, including legal fees, if any, in 
the amount of One Million ($1,000,000.00) Dollars, aris- 
ing out of any claim, action, award, compromise, settle- 
ment or judgment by reason of an intentional tort, or by 
reason of any act or omission which constitutes a violation 
of the civil rights of any person under federal or state law, 
if such employee or officer at the time of such intentional 
tort or such act or omission was acting within the scope of 
his official duties or employment, and provided that no 
such employee or officer shall be indemnified for viola 
tion of any such civil rights if he acted in a grossly 
negligent, willful or malicious manner; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Health to engage a professional engineer for 
the purpose of preparing a study and report on the feasi- 
bility of a septage disposal system for the Town of 
Chelmsford, said facility to be located at the Swain Road 
landfill, and to transfer from available funds the sum of 
$6,500.00 for the preparation of the professional 
engineering study and report, and to transfer from avail- 
able funds the sum of $2,000.00 for the purpose of sub- 
surface and geotechnical exploration and borings in con- 
nection with said study and report with the total expendi- 
ture not to exceed a combined cost of $8,500.00, and to 
determine whether the funds shall be raised by taxation, 
by appropriation or transfer from available funds in the 
Treasury or by borrowing under the provisions of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Health to engage a professional engineer for 
the purpose of preparation of construction plans and 
specifications for a septage disposal system at the Swain 
Road landfill, contingent upon the demonstration of the 
feasibility of system construction in the previously 
authorized report and study, and to transfer from avail- 
able funds the sum of $6,000.00 to be utilized by the 
Board of Health in having construction plans and specifi 
cations prepared for said disposal system and to deter 



8 



mine whether the funds shall be raised by taxation, by 
appropriation or transfer from available funds in the 
Treasury, or by borrowing under the provisions of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; or act in relation thereto. 



the Board of Selectmen, the McFarlin School - B 
Building and land therewith, for the purpose of rehabili- 
tating said structure for elderly housing and said con- 
veyance shall take place not later than June 30, 1979; or 
act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to transfer by a good and sufficient 
bill of sale, title to one (1) 1972 Chevrolet pickup truck 
with snow plow being used by the Fire Department; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to sell and transfer by good and 
sufficient bill of sale, title to certain equipment presently 
being used by the Highway Department as follows: 

(a) Two truck chassis (for waste collection) present- 
ly being used by the Highway Department. 

(b) Two non-packer bucket type loader bodies pre- 
sently used by the Highway Department; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds a certain sum of money for the pur- 
chase of equipment for the Highway Department, such 
purchase to be made under the direction of the Board of 
Selectmen as follows: 

(a) To purchase one (1) truck chassis (for waste col- 
lections) for the Highway Department 

(b) To purchase three (3) packer bodies (for waste 
collection) for the Highway Department; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from the Public Law 81-874 account the sum of One 
Hundred Twelve Thousand ($112,000.00) Dollars to pay 
the teachers of the Chelmsford Public Schools, said 
amount to honor the balance of salaries due them for the 
1977/78 school year under the terms of the Agreement 
negotiated by them with the School Committee for the 
1977 to 1980 school years and signed October 25, 1978; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropri- 
ate and transfer a certain sum of money from Antireces- 
sion Fiscal Assistance funds to various accounts for the 
maintenance of basic services; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the School Committee for the Town of Chelmsford to 
transfer to the Chelmsford Housing Authority, through 



Board of Selectmen 
ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the filing of a petition in the General Court under the 
provisions of Section 8 of Article 89 of the Amendments 
to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts for a special act: "Enabling the Town of Chelmsford 
to pay the sum of Five Thousand Four Hundred Ninety 
Five and 98/100 ($5,495.98) Dollars to Highway Depart- 
ment employees for overtime worked during the fiscal 
years 1976, 1977 and 1978"; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Thomas O'Brien all 
right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in a por- 
tion of a public way known as Green Way, for considera- 
tion to be determined, and to request an adjudication 
from the County Commissioners that the common conve- 
nience and necessity no longer requires said portion to be 
maintained as a public way; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 16th day of January A.D., 
1979 

William R. Murphy, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. January 16, 1979 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; North Ele- 
mentary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South 
Row School; Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford 
Road, fourteen days at least before the time appointed 
for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A true copy, attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

February 1, 1979 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 
PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlinjr., who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 717 voters 
present. Chairman of the Board of Selectmen William R. 
Murphy moved that the reading of the Constable's return 
of service and the posting of the warrant be waived. It was 
so voted, unanimously. Mr. Murphy moved that the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously. 

The Moderator then announced to the Town Meeting 
Body that due to the resignations of Richard Sullivan and 
Marvin Schenk, of the Finance Committee, David 
McLaughlin and George Nelson had been appointed to 
take their places. The Moderator also announced that the 
Finance Committee would now have two co-chairman of 
the committee. Kathryn Hughes and George Ripsom 
were the new co-chairmen. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to approve the following resolution: 

"Resolved that the Board of Health of the Town of 
Chelmsford be advised that the Town approves of their 
current policy to refuse to issue new licenses to authorize 
the establishment of a business of massage. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to rescind the balance of $270,786.00 from 
"Loans Authorized" as approved under Article 22 of the 
Annual Town Meeting held March 12, 1973. Said Article 
authorized borrowing $950,000.00 for the reconstruction 
of Cyrstal Lake and only the sum of $679,214.00 required 
borrowing was necessary to complete this project. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Murphy moved; that 
the Town vote pursuant to Section 9 of Chapter 258, 
Massachusetts General Laws, as inserted by Chapter 512 
of the Acts of 1978, to transfer from the Reserve Fund the 
sum of $2,500.00 to effect insurance providing indemnity 
for each officer and employee of the Town, including the 
school department, from personal financial loss and ex- 
pense, including legal fees, if any, in the amount of 
$500,000.00 arising out of any claim, action, award, 
compromise, settlement or judgment by reason of an in- 
tentional tort, or by reason of any act or omission which 
constitutes a violation of the civil rights of any person 
under federal or state law, if such employee or officer at 
the time of such intentional tort or such act or omission 
was acting within the scope of his official duties or 
employment and provided that no such employee or of- 
ficer shall be indemnified for violation of any such civil 
rights if he acted in a grossly negligent, willful or 
malicious manner. 



The Finance Committee is in favor of the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Health to engage 
a professional engineer for the purpose of preparing a 
study and report on the feasibility of a septage disposal 
system for the Town of Chelmsford, said facility to be 
located at the Swain Road landfill, in the sum of 
$6,500.00 for the preparation of the professional 
engineering study and report, and the sum of $2,000.00 
for the purpose of subsurface and geotechnical explora- 
tion and borings in connection with said study and report 
with the total expenditure not to exceed a combined cost 
of $8,500.00 to be transferred from the Finance Commit- 
tee Reserve Fund. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Murphy moved to 
withdraw this article. The Finance Committee recom- 
mends withdrawal. Motion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
transfer by a good and sufficient bill of sale, title to one 
(1) 1972 Chevrolet pickup truck with snow plow being us- 
ed by the Fire Department. 

Selectman Murphy explained the reasoning for this ar- 
ticle. The Chelmsford Lodge of Elks had raised money 
for the Jaws of Life Machine. Because of this the Town 
didn't need to buy the machine itself, as a result the 
Town would be able to purchase the pickup truck if so 
voted. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage. Motion 
Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell 
and transfer by good and sufficient bill of sale, title to 
certain equipment presently being used by the Highway 
Department as follows: 

Two non-packer bucket type loader bodies presently 
being used by the Highway Department. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to transfer from Free Cash the sum of 
$27,550.06, to be applied to the purchase of equipment 
for the Highway Department, such purchase to be made 
under the direction of the Board of Selectmen, as follows: 

(a) To purchase one ( 1 ) Truck chassis (for waste col- 
lection) for the Highway Department 

(b) To purchase one (1) packer body (for waste col- 
lection) for the Highway Department 

(c) To purchase Two (2) Dump Bodies for the High- 
way Department 



10 



The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 



UNDER ARTICLE 9 Myra Silver, Chairman of the 
School Committee, moved that the Town vote to transfer 
from the Public Law 81-874 account the sum of $112,- 
000.00 to pay the teachers of the Chelmsford Public 
Schools, said amount to honor the balance of salaries due 
them for the 1977/1978 school year under the terms of 
the Agreement negotiated by them with the School Com- 
mittee for the 1977 to 1980 school years and signed Oc- 
tober 25, 1978. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of the 
article. Motion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to appropriate and transfer from Anti- 
recession Fiscal Assistance funds the sum of $16,765.88 to 
the Snow and Ice Account and $5,495.98 to a Highway 
Salary Reserve Account for the maintenance of basic ser- 
vices. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford, through its 
Board of Selectmen, vote to convey to the Chelmsford 
Housing Authority not later than June 30, 1979, for the 
purpose of constructing elderly housing, all right, title 
and interest to the land with the buildings thereon shown 
as Parcel 1, bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the northeasterly sideline of 
Wilson Street, said point being 150 feet, more or less, 
from the intersection of Billerica Road and Wilson 
Street; 

thence in an easterly direction, by land of Emerson et 
al and other land of the grantor, 255 feet, more 
or less, to the westerly side of the McFarlin 
School; 

thence in a northerly and easterly direction, by the 
westerly and northerly side of said school, to a 
corner of said School; 

thence northerly, in part, by the westerly side of said 
School, 105 feet, more or less, to a point; 

thence westerly, parallel to and 50 feet from the north- 
erly side of the Library Building, as shown, 145 
feet, more or less, to a point; 

thence northwesterly, 80 feet, more or less, to a point; 

thence on a line southwesterly, still by land of Grantor, 
235 feet, more or less, said line being 96 feet 
northwesterly from Building "B", as shown, to 
a point in the northeasterly sideline of Wilson 
Street; 

thence southeasterly, by the northeast sideline of 



Wilson Street, 260 feet, more or less, to th< 
point of beginning. 

Containing 72,600 square feet, more or less. 

Also meaning and intending to convey a 20 foot drain 
and access easement from Chelmsford Street to the 
easterly side of the above described Parcel 1 and a 20 foot 
drain easement running in a northeasterly direction from 
the drain and access easement, 550 feet, more or less, 
across land of said Grantor. 

Also a sewer easement east of Parcel 1, to accommodate 
the existing septic system and a 30 foot construction ease- 
ment as shown on said plan. 

The Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford will main- 
tain a 10 foot maintenance easement along the westerly 
and northerly sides of said McFarlin School where Parcel 
1 abuts the building. 

All as shown on a plan entitled "Compiled Plan" by Em- 
mons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc. Engineers and Survey- 
ors, Billerica, Massachusetts; Scale 1 inch =100 feet; 
dated January 1979. 

The above article requires a 2/3 vote for passage. The 
Finance Committee is in favor of passage. The moderator 
attempted to take a vote by voice, The motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to approve the filing of a petition in the 
General Court under the provisions of Section 8 of Article 
89 of the Amendments to the Constitution of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts for a special act: "Enabling 
the Town of Chelmsford to pay the sum of $5,495.98 to 
Highway Department employees for overtime worked 
during the fiscal years 1976, 1977, and 1978. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Selectman Murphy moved, that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
convey to Thomas O'Brien all right, title, and interests, if 
any, held by the Town in a portion of a public way known 
as Green Way, said land being bound and described as 
follows: 

A certain parcel of land in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, 
being a portion of Green Way as shown on M.N.R.D. 
Plan book G and being shown as parcel A on a plan en- 
titled "Study Plan for Thomas and Josephine O'Brien" 
dated December 1978 by William G. Troy, Land Survey- 
or; being more particularly bounded and described as 
follows: 

Beginning at a point on the westerly side of Green Way at 
the Southerly corner of Lot 48; thence South 17-01-10 
West a distance of one hundred forty-eight and 72/100 
(148.72) feet to a point; thence North 74-50-30 east a 
distance of ten and 47/100 (10.47) feet to a point; thence 
By a curve to the right having a radius of sixty-two and 
50/100 (62.50) feet and a length of one hundred eighty- 



11 



nine and 42/100 (189.42) feet to a point; thence 
By a curve to the left having a radius of twenty- five and 
00/100 (25.00) feet and a length of thirty-five and 65/100 
(35.66) feet to the point of beginning. 

Containing 8136 square feet more or less. 

For consideration to be determined and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to request an adjudication from the 
County Commissioners that the common convenience 
and necessity no longer requires said portion be main- 
tained as a public way. The conveyance to be contingent 
upon receipt of said adjudication. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of the article. Mo- 
tion Carried unanimously. 

Selectman Murphy moved that the Town Meeting ad- 
journ sine die at 8:15 PM. Motion Carried. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mry E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR 

THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 7, 1979 and April 30, 1979 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1. McFarlin School-All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House - Old Westford Road 

On Saturday, the seventh day of April, 1979, being the 
first Saturday in said month, at 8:00 A.M., for the follow- 
ing purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years 



One Asssessor for three years 

One Member of the Board of Health for three years 

One Member of the School Committee for three years 

One Member of Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
District for three years 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 

One Park Commissioner for three years 

Two Public Library Trustees for three years 

One Public Library Trustee for one year to fill vacancy 

Three Planning Board Members for three years 

One Sewer Commissioner for three years 

And to vote on the following questions: 

QUESTION 1 

"Shall the Town distribute to its insured 
employees, after deducting the Town's total Yes D 

administrative cost, the balance of any group 
insurance dividend which shall be based upon No □ 

the employees' proportionate share of the 
total premiums paid for all insurance 
coverages?" 

Question 2 This Question is Non-Binding 

Do you favor changing town meeting from the Yes □ 

present open town meeting to a representative No □ 

form of town meeting? 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; and 
to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School Gymnasium 
on Monday, the 30th day of April, 1979 at 7:30 P.M. 
o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel, Wage, and Salary Administration By-Law as 
follows: 

1. Under Section 3 subtitled PERSONNEL BOARD 
delete the fourth paragraph and substitute the 
following in its place: "No public member of the 
Personnel Board may be an employee of the Town 
nor hold Town Office whether appointed or 
elected. The Personnel Member of the Personnel 
Board may not hold town office whether appointed 
or elected but may otherwise be an employee who is 
subject to this by-law." 

2. Under Section 4 subtitled SCOPE OF PLAN AND 
AUTHORITY OF THE PERSONNEL BOARD 

amend subparagraph (c) by adding the following: 
"The Board shall have authority to decide all ques- 



12 



tions relating to the application of this by-law, and 
to set the grade levels, salary ranges, and rates of 
pay for all positions under its jurisdiction." 

3. Under Section 6 subtitled CLASSIFICATION OF 
PRESENT TOWN EMPLOYEES delete sub 
paragraph (b) and (c) and amend the remaining 
subparagraphs by relettering as follows: (d) to be 
(b); (e) to be (c); (f) to be (d) and (g) to be (e). 



4. Under Section 7 subtitled CLASSIFICATION OF 
NEW EMPLOYEES delete the subtitled and 
substitute the subtitled HIRING OF NEW EM- 
PLOYEES and further amend said section by 
deleting subparagraph 7 (a) and substituting the 
following: "The wage or salary of a new employee 
may be set by an appointed or elected Board pro 
vided the Board is in unanimous agreement and the 
salary is between Step 1 and Step 6. 

If the Board is not in unanimous agreement or re- 
quests a salary in excess of Step 6, the Personnel 
Board must approve the request. The wage or 
salary of a new employee supervised by an ap- 
pointed or elected individual must be approved by 
the Personnel Board. 

5. Under Section 8 subtitled INCREASES WITHIN 
GRADE LEVELS amend the subtitle by adding 
the words "and Promotions" and further amend 
section 8 by adding subparagraph (c) as follows: (c) 
The promotion of an employee must be approved 
by the Personnel Board. An employee receiving a 
promotion shall be placed in the step of the new 
grade which corresponds closest to the salary he 
would have received from a 4 step increase in his 
previous grade level or the minimum of his new 
grade level whichever is higher. 

6. Under Section 19 subtitled HOURS OF WORK 

shall be as follows delete the subtitle and substitute 
the subtitle HOURS OF WORK and further 
amend section 8 by deleting subparagraphs A I and 
A II and substitute the following: 
A. Full-time permanent members 

I. Positions classified as Administrative and 
Clerical - 37 V& hours per week; 

II. Conservation, Parks and Cemetery - 40 
hours per week; 

III. Custodial - 40 hours per week; 

IV. Library - 37 V6 hours per week; 

V. Youth Center - 37 V^ hours per week. 

7. And further amending said by-law by adding the 
following section: 

Section 27. Employment of Relative: No person 
will be employed in a department which has a 
member of his or her immediate family as another 
employee or in a department which is governed by 
an appointing authority or elected official who is a 
member of his or her immediate family without 
Personnel Board approval. The immediate family 
means grandparent, parent, children, brother, 
sister, mother-in-law, father-in-law, brother-in-law 



or sister-in-law. This section is effective as of the 
date of enactment and does not affect prior existing 
relationships. 

And further amending said by-law by adding the 
following section: 

Section 28. Advertisement for Openings of Jobs: 
These openings should include the title of the job , a 
brief description and salary level and salary range 
for the job and how and where applications for 
employment should be made. A copy of the open- 
ing and subsequent filling of the position should be 
forwarded to the Personnel Board. 

Under Section 6 subtitled Classification of Present 
Town Employees, amend Section g-Wage and 
Salary Schedule to read as follows: 

Wage and Salary Schedule 
July 1, 1979 -June 30, 1980 



Grade Level 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



Salary Range 

$6,300-8,694 
7,245-9,998 
8,190-11,302 
9,135-12,606 
10,080-13,910 
11,025-15,215 
11,970-16,519 
12,915-17,823 
13,860 19,127 
14,805-20,431 
15,750-21,735 
16,695-23,039 
17,640-23,343 
18,585-25,647 
19,530-26,951 
20,475-28,256 
21,420-29,560 
22,365-30,864 
23,310-32,168 
24,255-33,472 



10. Under Section 8, subtitled INCREASES WITHIN 
GRADE LEVELS, add paragraph (c) as follows: 

(c) An increase shall be granted to each employee 
governed by the By-Law on the first day of the fiscal 
year equal to the percentage increase approved by 
Town Meeting to the Salary Ranges specified in 
Section 6, paragraph G. 

11. Under Section 8 subtitled INCREASES WITHIN 
GRADE LEVELS, delete paragraph (a) and sub- 
stitute the following: 

(a) A step increase in rate for any employee who is 
above Step 1 will be effective on the employee's an- 
niversary date and must be recommended by the 
employee's department head. 

12. Under Section 24, subtitled "JOB TITLES AND 
STANDARD RATES FOR WAGES AND SAL- 
ARIES OF THE PERSONNEL WAGE AND 
SALARY BY-LAW", by deleting therefrom the 



13 



following positions under Administration & 
Clerical, 3. Clerk; under Library, 5. Librarian 
Specialist, and adding the following positions: 5. 
Library Specialist- Bookkeeper, 6. Library Special- 
ist-Cataloger, 7. Library Specialist -Reference Lib- 
rarian, 8. Library Specialist-Secretary/Reception- 
ist, and under Miscellaneous, 9. Local Inspector. 

ARTICLE 2A. To see if the Town will vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law", to conform to rates of pay negotiated by 
the Town with certain labor organizations, pursuant to 
General Laws, Chapter 150E. 



Recreation 










1 . Clerk. Part time 


3 81 hr 


2 

#2 


2 

#2 






140 wk 


117 wk 




Minimum 


Maximum 




3. Swimming Director 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 


wk. 


•#2 


4. Swimming Instructor 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 


wk. 


•#2 


5. PlaygTound Director 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 


wk. 


•#2 


6. Playground Supvsr. 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 


wk. 


•#2 


7. Playground Inst. 


76.40 wk. 


109 20 


wk. 


•#2 


8. Sports Instructor 


76.40 wk. 


109 20 


wk. 


•#2 


Youth Center 










1. Youth Center Coordinator 


12.084 p. a. 


7 


7 




2. Youth Center Supervisor 


3 70 hr 


2 


2 




3. Clerk Youth 


3 81 hr 


2 


2 




Miscellaneous 











Current 

7/78-6/79 
Administrative tic Clerical 
1. Veteran's Agent $12,792 pa. 

2 Clerk. Senior 9.396 pa. 

3. Town Accountant 18. 126 pa. 

4. Assistant Treasurer 10.752 p. a. 

5. Town Counsel 500 pa. 

6. Selectmen's Adm. Asst 14.256 pa. 

7. Board of Registrars' Clerk 850 pa. 

8. Bd. of Reg. . three members 360 each 

9. Clerk, part time 3.81 hr. 

10. Town Aide 10,368 pa. 

11. Assistant Town Clerk 10.750 p. a. 

12. Adm. Asst. to Assessors 

Assessor 10.752 pa. 

Conservation, Parks tic Cemetery 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 16. 104 p. a. 

2. Supt. of Insect & Pest Control 1 .250 p. a. 

3. Landscaper Park 
1 Laborer Park 

5. Unskilled Laborer 2.65 hr.*#4 

6. Skilled Forest Workman- 

Conservation 

7. Equipment Operator, Cemetery 6.00 hr. 

8. Park Superintendent 16, 104 p. a. 

Custodial 



1. Custodian 



4.16hr. 



Cur. 


Prop. 


Proposed 


Level 


Level 


Salary 


8 


8 




4 


4 




12 


12 




5 


5 








500 pa. 


9 


9 






- 


850 pa. 


- 


- 


360 ea 


2 


2 




5 


5 




5 


5 





2 


2 


1 


1 


#2 


#4, 


1 


1 


4 


4 


9 


9 



Library 

1 Library Director 16.536 pa. 

2. Library Asst. Director 11. 856 p. a. 

3. Branch Librarian 10.944 p. a. 

4. Librarian. Dcpt Head 4.14 hr. 

5. Library Specialist Bookkeeper 3.98 hr. 

6. Library Specialist Cataloger 3 98 hr. 

7. Library Specialist Reference Lib. 3 98 hr. 

8. Library Specialist Set Rec 3.98 hr. 
9 Librarian Assistants 3.56 hr. 

10. Librarian Clerk 3.74 hr. 

11. Aides . ... *#4 2.65hr. 

12. Supervisor Maintenance 10,614 pa. 

Highwav Department 

1. Highway Superintendent 21.332 pa. 

2. Highway Foreman 7.21 hr 

3. Administrative Assistant 



Town Fire Department 

1. Fire Chief 28.504 p. a. '#2 #5 

2. Deputy Fire Chief 23.943 p. a. *#2. #6 

3. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 6.34 hr. 6 

Town Police Department 

1. Police Chief 27.408 p. a. '#2. #5 

2. DeputyChief 22.195 p. a. •#2. #7 



1.250 pa. 



#4. #2 2.90 hr 



7 


7 


5 


5 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


*#2 


#2 


4 


4 



12 


12 


9 


9 


#1 


#1 



#2, #5 

#2. #6 

6 



#2, #5 
#2. #7 



2.90 hr 



•#2 


#2 


10 


10 


•#2 


#2 


9 


9 


•#2 


#2 


2 


2 


•#2 


#2 



1. Animal Inspector 1.000 pa. 

2. Building Inspector 1-7.777 pa. 

3. Gas Inspector 3.750 pa. 

4. Electric Inspector 15.312 p. a. 

5. Sealer of Wghts. & Meas 2,000 pa. 

6. Dog Officer 8 142 pa. 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 6.480 pa. 

8. Clock Winder 100 pa. 

9. Local Inspector 

Footnotes 



*#1 Represented by Collective Bargaining Union 

•#2 Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

'#3 No percentage increase range only 

*#4 Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

*#5 ■ Salary will be 200% of the highest paid union firefighter patrolman 

established by State Law 

*#6 Salary will be 84% of the Fire Chief 

•#7 Salary will be 81% of the Police Chief 



or act in relation thereto. 



Recommended 



Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 2B. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Personnel Wage and Salary Administration By-Law 
by adding the following sentence after the first sentence, 
second paragraph, subsection (c) of Section 4: 

The appointing authority shall select the step of the 
salary scale at which the employee shall commence 
employment within the salary range established for each 
position. 

Library Trustees 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of mone; as may be required to 
defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1 , 
1979 to June 30, 1980; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1979; in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or act in relation 
thereto. 



14 



Treasurer 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to request 
the Department of Corporation and Taxation, Division 
of Accounts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
make an audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money with which to meet 
bills for previous years; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension, expense and military service funds; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discre- 
tion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the transfer of $100,000 from free cash to pay a bond 
issue note or notes borrowed for the purpose of erecting 
bleachers and appurtenant structures at the site of the 
new Chelmsford High School; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$50,000 to the New High School Construction Account; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 1 1 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money for the purpose of 
purchasing nine (9) new 1980 four door sedans to be used 
by the Police Department, said purchase to be made 
under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to 
authorize the Selectmen to transfer by good and sufficient 
bill of sale, title to one (1) 1976, one (1) 1977 and four (4) 
1979 cruisers now being used by the Police Department; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a sum of 
money to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the purpose to 
provide mutual aid programs for the police department; 
or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be placed in a special fund as authorized 
under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53C of the 
General Laws. Said funds to be used, along with all other 
monies received by the Town as Compensation earned by 
its employees from off-duty work details, in such manner 
and at such times as shall, in the discretion of the authori- 
ty authorizing such off-duty work detail, compensate the 
employee for such services; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a 1979 or 1980 four- 
door sedan type vehicle for the Fire Department, said 
purchase to be made under the supervision of the Board 
of Selectmen; and to authorize said Board to transfer by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) 1973 Chevrolet 
four-door sedan type vehicle now being used by the Fire 
Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to dispose of equipment 
presently being used by the Highway Department as 
follows: 

(a) To purchase two (2) truck chassis (for waste collec- 
tions) for the Highway Department and to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) waste collec- 
tion truck presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(b) To purchase two (2) packer bodies (for waste collec- 
tions) for the Highway Department. 

(c) To purchase two (2) snow plows for the Highway 
Department. 

(d) To purchase one (1) Pickup Truck for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale one (1) Pickup Truck presently being used 
by the Highway Department. 

(e) To purchase one (1) Dump Truck for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale one (1) dump truck presently being used by 
the Highway Department. 

(f) To purchase one (1) Sweeper Broom for the 
Highway Department and to sell by good and suffi- 
cient bill of sale three (3) sweeper brooms. 

(g) To purchase one (1) six yard Sander body for the 
Highway Department and to sell by good and suffi- 
cient bill of sale one (1) Sander Body presently be- 
ing used by the Highway Department. 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a 1979 or 1980 Lawn 



15 



and Garden Tractor, and sell by good and sufficient bill 
of sale one (1) John Deere 140 Tractor with rotary mower 
and vacuum attachment; or act in relation thereto. 

Park Commissioners 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
$5,000 from the sale of graves and lots to the Cemetery 
Improvement and Development Fund; or act in relation 
thereto. 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$23,000 for the purpose of providing engineering, legal, 
and contractual services to furnish and install a drainage 
system starting at the rear of the South Row School, ter- 
minating in River Meadow Brook. Such system to be 
essentially as outlined by a "sketch" plan developed by 
Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu dated January 1979, and 
designed to eliminate persistent flooding problems at the 
rear of the South Row School; or act in relation thereto. 



Cemetery Commissioners 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1 ,600 for roof repairs at the maintenance building of the 
Cemetery Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commissioners 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from the Perpetual Care Interest Account $5,000 into the 
Beautification Account; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commissioners 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of resurfacing portions of cer- 
tain streets throughout the Town with Type I bituminous 
concrete; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to engage an outside professional consul- 
tant to evaluate traffic conditions in Vinal Square and 
Golden Cove Road areas; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the construction of sidewalks; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money to alleviate certain 
drainage problems throughout the Town, under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money for the channeliza- 
tion of Beaver Brook and River Meadow Brook as recom- 
mended in the Camp Dresser and McGee Report entitled 
"Flood Control Beaver Brook and River Meadow Brook"; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



School Committee 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money for additional in- 
stallation of enough storm -drains to alleviate water pro- 
blems in the vicinity of Gail Street, Warren Avenue, and 
Pearson Street for the past several years; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the engineering, grading and construc- 
tion of two Soccer Fields at the Harrington School site; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Recreation Committee 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1 ,800 to be used to join or buy into the Elder Services of 
the Merrimack Valley, Inc., for the purpose of obtaining 
services for the care of the Town's Older Americans; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$2,520 to purchase a certain parcel of land from the 
Trustees of the Penn Central Transportation Co., 
situated in the Town of Chelmsford, County of Mid- 
dlesex, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded 
Southeasterly by land of Penn Central Transportation 
Co., and Northwesterly by land of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, being part of a right-of-way known as the Lowell 
Secondary Branch I.D. No. MAB100-CO2 and shown on 
VAL Map No. 500-9104D-23-1 containing 8,000 square 
feet more or less; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$6,750 to purchase a certain parcel of land with im- 
provements from the Trustees of the Penn Central 
Transportation Co., situated in the Town of Chelmsford, 
County of Middlesex, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
bounded easterly by land now or formerly of State 
Lumber Company and northwesterly by land now or 
formerly of Grantor, being part of a right-of-way known 
as the Lowell Secondary Branch ID. No. MAB100-CO2 
and shown on VAL Map No. 500-9104-041-D-23-1 , as 



16 



Parcel I.D. No. MAB100-582 containing 15,000 square 
feet more or less; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1,332 to purchase a certain parcel of land from the 
Trustees of the Penn Central Transportation Co. situated 
in the Town of Chelmsford, County of Middlesex, Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, bounded Northwesterly 
and Northeasterly by Grantor, Southeasterly by land now 
or formerly of Raymond T. Osborn, and Southwesterly 
by Central Square, being part of a right-of-way known as 
the Lowell Secondary Branch, I.D. No. MAB100-C02 
and shown on VAL Map No. 500-9104-141D-23-1 con- 
taining 4,000 square feet more or less; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the proposal of the Regional District School Committee 
passed on March 20, 1979, to amend the agreement 
establishing the Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
District as amended (a) by providing for the admission to 
the district of such of the Towns of Ayer, Pepperell, 
Shirley and Townsend as vote to accept the agreement as 
amended; (b) by providing that members of the Commit- 
tee shall be appointed by an appointing committee in 
each town consisting of the moderator, selectmen and 
local school committee members; (c) by providing that 
membership on the Committee shall be as follows: 
Chelmsford - 3 members, Groton - 1 member, Littleton 
-1 member, Westford - 2 members, Ayer - 2 members (if 
Ayer joins the district), Pepperell - 1 member (if Pep- 
perell joins), Shirley - 1 member (if Shirley joins) and 
Townsend - 1 member (if Townsend joins); (d) by pro- 
viding that each member town shall have an alternate 
member to the Committee who can serve in the absence 
or disability of a member from the Town involved; (e) by 
providing that the capital costs related to the addition to 
the district school authorized by a vote of the Committee 
passed March 20, 1979 shall be apportioned among such 
of the Towns of Ayer, Pepperell, Shirley and Townsend 
as vote to accept the agreement as amended on the basis 
of their respective pupil enrollments in the district school 
(prior capital costs continuing to be apportioned among 
the present member towns essentially as presently provid- 
ed in the agreement); (f) by providing that the capital 
costs of any subsequent capital improvements of the 
district shall be apportioned among all the member towns 
on the basis of their respective pupil enrollment in the 
district school; (g) by providing that in each case where 
the apportionment of capital costs is to be based on pupil 
enrollment in the district school, each member town shall 
be deemed to have an enrollment of at least five (5) 
pupils; (h) by conforming the dates on which payments to 
the district by the member towns are due to a July 1 -June 
30 fiscal year; and (i) by making technical changes in- 
cidental to the foregoing amendments. (Such amend- 
ment will not become effective until the amendment is 
accepted by the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton 
and Westford and at least two of the Towns of Ayer, Pep- 
perell, Shirley and Townsend.) Copies of the agreement 



as amended and as proposed to be amended, as described 
in this Article, are available at the office of the town 
clerk; or act in relation thereto. 

Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School District Committee 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town under and pursuant 
to authority granted in General Laws Chapter 40D, Sec- 
tion 21 (g) as amended, will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to enter into a contract with the operator of 
solid waste disposal facilities to be established in the 
Town of North Andover for the disposal of refuse, gar- 
bage and waste and for the use of by-products resulting 
from the operation of such facilities, which contract will 

(1) be for a term of twenty years, more or less; 

(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum 
amounts of refuse, garbage and waste and pay- 
ments for the use of the facilities to be based 
thereon; 

(3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated and 
for adjustments thereof and for the use of steam, 
electricity and other by-products resulting from the 
use of the facilities and for credits or payments of 
the Town resulting therefrom; 

(4) the use of the Town or other municipalities of the 
uncommitted capacity of such facilities; 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related to 
the foregoing general matters; and 

(6) be generally in the form of proposed contract 
negotiated by representatives of the member com- 
munities of the Northeast Solid Waste Committee 
(NESWC) with such changes therein as may be ap- 
proved by said Board of Selectmen; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by fee simple or emi- 
nent domain a certain parcel of land located off Canal 
Street in accordance with Chapter 132A and Chapter 40. 
This land contains approximately 24.12 acres and is 
described in a deed to Isaac Siegel et ux dated December 
1, 1970 and recorded in the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 2302 Page 369. 

The land is to be held, managed and controlled by the 
Conservation Commission for the promotion and 
development of the natural resources and for the protec- 
tion of the watershed resources of the Town, and further, 
for the purpose of acquiring said land, that the Conserva- 
tion Commission be authorized to enter into a contrac- 
tual self-help agreement with the Office of Environmen- 
tal Affairs, and that the Town raise and appropriate a 
certain sum of money and authorize the Selectmen to ex- 
pend a certain sum of money from the Conservation Fund 
for such acquisition; or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by fee simple or emi- 
nent domain, in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 132A and Chapter 40, a certain parcel of 



17 



land located off Acton Road owned now or formerly by 
Thomas Liakos and described as follows: 

Plat Number and Lot Number 100 as described in 
a deed dated January 27, 1975 and recorded in 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
2139 Page 33. 

This land contains approximately 8.23 acres and is to be 
held, managed and controlled by the Conservation Com- 
mission for the promotion and development of the 
natural resources and for the protection of the watershed 
resources of the Town, and further, for the purpose of ac- 
quiring said land, that the Conservation Commission be 
authorized to enter into a contractual self-help agree- 
ment with the Office of Environmental Affairs, and that 
the Town raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000.00 and 
authorize the Selectmen to expend the sum of $4,000.00 
from the Conservation Fund for such acquisition; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to join the 
Lowell Regional Transit Authority in conformity with 
and pursuant to all of the applicable provisions of 
Chapter 161B; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to participate in the Lowell Regional 
Transit Authority's Handicap and Elderly Rides pro- 
gram; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 90, Section 20C of the Massachusetts General 
Laws: Violations of Parking Regulations, etc., in Certain 
Cities and Towns; Notice; Appearance; Schedule of 
Fines; Proceedings not Criminal; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article I General Provisions by ad- 
ding the following section pursuant to Chapter 40 Section 
21D of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Section 2 - Noncriminal Disposition of Violations of any 
Ordinance, By-Law or Regulation of any Municipal Of- 
ficer, Board or Department. 

Any person taking cognizance of a violation of a specific 
ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation which he is em- 
powered to enforce, hereinafter referred to as the enforc- 
ing person, as an alternative to initiating criminal pro- 
ceedings, may pursuant to Chapter 40 Section 21 D of 
Massachusetts General Laws, give the offender a written 
notice to appear before the clerk of the District Court of 



Lowell, or any other Court having jurisdiction thereof, at 
any time during the office hours, not later than twenty- 
one days after the date of such notice. Such notice shall 
be in triplicate and shall contain the name and address, if 
known, of the offender, the specific offense charged, and 
the time and place for his required appearance. Such 
notice shall be signed by the enforcing person, and shall 
be signed by the offender whenever practicable in 
acknowledgement that such notice has been received. 
The enforcing person shall, if possible, deliver to the of- 
fender a copy of said notice at the time and place of the 
violation. If it is not possible to deliver a copy of said 
notice to the offender at the time and place of the viola- 
tion, said copy shall be mailed or delivered by the enforc- 
ing person, or by his commanding officer or the head of 
his department or by any person authorized by such com- 
manding officer, department or head to the offender's 
last known address, within fifteen days after said viola- 
tion. Such notice as so mailed shall be deemed a sufficient 
notice, and a certificate of the person so mailing such 
notice that it has been mailed in accordance with this sec- 
tion shall be prima facie evidence thereof. 

At or before the completion of each tour of duty, or at the 
beginning of the first subsequent tour of duty, the enforc- 
ing person shall give to his commanding officer or depart- 
ment head those copies of each notice of such violation he 
has taken cognizance of during such tour which have not 
already been delivered or mailed by him as aforesaid. 
Said commanding officer or department head shall retain 
and safely preserve one copy and shall, at a time not later 
than the next court day after such delivery or mailing, 
deliver the other copy to the clerk of the court before 
which the offender has been notified to appear. The clerk 
of the District Court shall maintain a separate docket of 
all such notices to appear. 

Any person notified to appear before the clerk of a 
district court as hereinbefore provided may so appear and 
confess the offense charged, either personally or through 
a duly authorized agent or by mailing to such clerk with 
the notice such specific sum of money not exceeding two 
hundred dollars as the town shall fix as penalty for viola- 
tion of the ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation. Such 
payment shall, if mailed, be made only by postal note, 
money order or check. The payment to the clerk of such 
sum shall operate as a final disposition of the case. An ap- 
pearance under this paragraph shall not be deemed to be 
a criminal proceeding. No person so notified to appear 
before the clerk of a district court shall be required to 
report to any probation officer, and no record of the case 
shall be entered in any probation records. If any person 
so notified to appear desires to contest the violation alleg- 
ed in the notice to appear, he may avail himself of the 
procedure established in Chapter 40 Section 2 ID; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 41 Section 100B of the Massachusetts General 
Laws: Indemnification of Retired Police Officers and 
Firefighters for certain hospital, etc. expenses; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



18 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 148 Section 26C of the Massachusetts General 
Laws: Smoke and Heat Detectors for Dwellings Not 
Otherwise Regulated; or act in relation thereto. 

Fire Department 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Chapter 71, Section 71 -E of the Massachusetts General 
Laws; An Act Providing for the Expenditure by School 
Committees of receipts from certain programs; or act in 
relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article II Town Meeting Section 3 
Town Meeting Rules of Order Subsection 2 - Quorum 
Requirements by deleting subparagraph 2.1 and sub- 
paragraph 2.2 and substituting the following: 

There shall be no quorum requirement to legally trans- 
act and consummate the business of the Town at any An- 
nual Town Meeting or any Special Town Meeting; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws by adding the following new sec- 
tion: Recall of Elected Officials - Section 1.1 - Holders 
of an elective office may be recalled. Any holder of an 
elective office may be recalled and removed therefrom by 
the qualified voters of the Town as herein provided. 
Recall is intended to be utilized when, in the opinion of 
the number of voters hereinafter specified, an elected of- 
ficial, acting as such, has caused a loss of confidence in 
his judgment or in his ability to perform reasonably the 
duties and responsibilities of his office. 

Section 1.2 - Affidavit, petition, preparation and filing 
Any ten qualified voters of the town may file with the 
town clerk an affidavit containing the name of the officer 
sought to be recalled and a statement of the grounds of 
recall. The town clerk shall forthwith transmit a copy of 
such affidavit to the officer sought to be recalled and to 
the selectmen. Within five days from the date of the filing 
of the affidavit, the town clerk shall deliver to the ten 
voters making such affidavit a sufficient number of copies 
of petition blanks demanding such recall. The blanks 
shall be issued, consecutively numbered, by the town 
clerk with his signature and official seal attached thereto, 
they shall be dated and addressed to the selectmen, shall 
contain the name of the person sought to be recalled, the 
grounds of recall as stated in the said affidavit, and the 
names of the persons to whom issued; and they shall de- 
mand the election of the successor to such office. The 
recall petition shall be returned and filed with the town 
clerk at or before 5:00 PM on the thirtieth day after is- 
suance of the petition. Said petition before being return- 
ed and filed shall be signed by at least ten percent of 
registered voters, and to every signature shall be added 
the place of residence of the signer,' giving the street and 
number. The town clerk shall deliver the petition to the 



registrars of voters, and the registrars shall within five 
days certify thereon the number of signatures which are 
names of voters of the town. 

Section 1.3 - Election as to recall and public hearing. 
If the petition shall be found certified by the town clerk 
and the registrars of voters to be sufficient, the town clerk 
shall allow five days for the filing of legal challenges to 
the signatures on the petition. If no challenges are filed, 
the town clerk shall forthwith submit the petition with his 
certificate to the selectmem. The selectmen shall for- 
thwith give written notice to said officer of the receipt of 
said certificate, and, if the officer sought to be removed 
does not resign within five days, shall order an election to 
be held on a day fixed by them not less than thirty nor 
more than forty-five days after the date of the town clerk's 
certificate that a sufficient petition is filed. If any other 
town election is to occur within sixty days- after the date of 
said certificate the selectmen may, at their discretion, 
postpone the holding of the recall election to the date of 
such other election. If a vacancy occurs in said office after 
a recall election has been so ordered, the election shall 
nevertheless proceed as in this section provided. If the of- 
ficer sought to be recalled so requests, the selectmen shall 
make provision for a public hearing on the matter, said 
hearing to take place not less than seven days prior to said 
election. 

Section 1.4 - Officer being recalled may be a candidate. 
Any officer sought to be recalled may be a candidate to 
succeed himself, and unless he requests otherwise in 
writing, the town clerk shall place his name on the official 
ballot without nomination. The nomination of other can- 
didates, the publication of the warrant for the recall elec- 
tion, and the conduct of the same shall be in accordance 
with the provisions of the law relating to elections, unless 
otherwise provided in the Town By-Laws. 

Section 1.5- Incumbent to continue duties unul recalled. 
The incumbent shall continue to perform the duties of his 
office until the recall election. If then re-elected, he shall 
continue in office for the remainder of his unexpired 
term, subject to recall as before, except as provided in 
Section 1.7. If not re-elected in the recall election, he 
shall be deemed removed upon the qualification of his 
successor, who, shall hold office during the unexpired 
term. If the successor fails to qualify within five days after 
receiving notification of his election, the incumbent shall 
thereupon be deemed removed and the office vacant. 

Section 1.6 - Form of ballots for recall. 
Ballots used in recall election shall submit the following 
propositions in the order indicated: 
For the removal of (name of officer) 
Against the removal of (name of officer) 
Under the propositions shall appear the word "Can- 
didates" and the direction "Vote for One" and beneath 
this the names of candidates nominated as hereinbefore 
provided. In the event the recall petition is passed, the 
candidate receiving the greatest number of votes shall be 
deemed elected. 

Section 1.7 - Limitations on petitions 

No recall petition shall be filed against an officer within 

six months after he takes office, nor in the case of an of- 



19 



ficer subjected to a recall election and not removed there- 
by, until at least six months after that election. 

Section 1.8 - Prohibition against appointment of recalled 
officer. 

No person who has been recalled from an office or who 
has resigned from office while recall proceedings were 
pending against him shall be appointed to the office from 
which he has been removed within one year after such 
removal by recall or resignation; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the filing of a Petition in the General Court under the 
provisions of Section 8 of Article 89 of the Amendments 
to the Constitution for a special act: 

Enabling the Town of Chelmsford to establish a 
procedure for Recall of Elected Officials as follows: 
Section 1.1- Holders of an elective office may be recalled. 
Any holder of an elective office may be recalled and 
removed therefrom by the qualified voters of the Town as 
herein provided. Recall is intended to be utilized when, 
in the opinion of the number of voters hereinafter 
specified, an elected official, acting as such, has caused a 
loss of confidence in his judgment or in his ability to per- 
form reasonably the duties and responsibilities of his of- 
fice. 

Section 1.2 - Affidavit, petition, preparation and filing. 
Any ten qualified voters of the town may file with the 
town clerk an affidavit containing the name of the officer 
sought to be recalled and a statement of the grounds of 
recall. The town clerk shall forthwith transmit a copy of 
such affidavit to the officer sought to be recalled and to 
the selectmen. Within five days from the date of the filing 
of the affidavit, the town clerk shall deliver to the ten 
voters making such affidavit a sufficient number of copies 
of petition blanks demanding such recall. The blanks 
shall be issued, consecutively numbered, by the town 
clerk with his signature and official seal attached thereto, 
they shall be dated and addressed to the selectmen, shall 
contain the name of the person sought to be recalled, the 
grounds of recall as stated in said affidavit, and the 
names of the persons to whom issued, and they shall de- 
mand the election of the successor to such office. The 
recall petition shall be returned and filed with the town 
clerk at or before 5:00 PM of the thirtieth day after is- 
suance of the petition. Said petition before being return- 
ed and filed shall be signed by at least ten percent of 
registered voters and to every signature shall be added the 
place of residence of the signer, giving the street and 
number. The town clerk shall deliver the petition to the 
registrars of voters, and the registrars shall within five 
days certify thereon the number of signatures which are 
names of voters of the town. 

Section 1.3 - Election as to recall and public hearing. 
If the petition shall be found certified by the town clerk 
and the registrars of voters to be sufficient, the town clerk 
shall allow five days for the filing of legal challenges to 
the signatures on the petition. If no such challenges are 
filed, the town clerk shall forthwith submit the petition 



with his certificate to the selectmen. The selectmen shall 
forthwith give written notice to said officer of the receipt 
of said certificate, and, if the officer sought to be remov- 
ed does not resign within five days, shall order an election 
to be held on a day fixed by them not less than thirty nor 
more than forty-five days after the date of the town clerks 
certificate that a sufficient petition is filed. If any other 
town election is to occur within sixty days after the date of 
said certificate the selectmen may, at their discretion, 
postpone the holding of the recall election to the date of 
such other election. If a vacancy occurs in said office after 
a recall election has been so ordered, the election shall 
nevertheless proceed as in this section provided. If the of- 
ficer sought to be recalled so requests, the selectmen shall 
make provision for a public hearing on the matter, said 
hearing to take place not less than seven days prior to said 
election. 

Section .1.4 - Officer being recalled may be a candidate. 
Any officer sought to be recalled may be a candidate to 
succeed himself, and unless he requests otherwise in 
writing, the town clerk shall place his name on the official 
ballot without nomination. The nomination of other can- 
didates, the publication of the warrant for the recall elec- 
tion, and the conduct of the same shall be in accordance 
with the provisions of the law relating to elections, unless 
otherwise provided in the Town by-laws. 

Section 1.5 - Incumbent to continue duties until recalled. 
The incumbent shall continue to perform the duties of his 
office until the recall election. If then re-elected, he shall 
continue in office for the remainder of his unexpired 
term, subject to recall as before, except as provided in 
Section 1.7. If not re-elected in the recall election, he 
shall be deemed removed upon the qualification of his 
successor, who, shall hold office during the unexpired 
term. If the successor fails to qualify within five days after 
receiving notification of his election, the incumbent shall 
be thereupon deemed removed and the office vacant. 

Section 1.6 - Form of ballots for recall. 
Ballots used in recall election shall submit the following 
propositions in the order indicated: 
For the removal of (name of officer) 
Against the removal of (name of officer) 
Under the propositions shall appear the word "Can- 
didates" and the direction "Vote for One" and beneath 
this the names of candidates nominated as hereinbefore 
provided. In the event the recall petition is passed, the 
candidate receiving the greatest number of votes shall be 
deemed elected. 

Section 1.7 - Limitations on petitions. 
No recall petition shall be filed against an officer within 
six months after he takes office, nor in the case of an of- 
ficer subjected to a recall election and not removed there- 
by, until at least six months after that election. 

Section 1.8 - Prohibition against appointment of recalled 

officer. 

No person who has been recalled from an office or who 

has resigned from office while recall proceedings were 

pending against him shall be appointed to the office from 

which he has been removed within one year after such 

removal by recall or resignation; or act in relation 

thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



20 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations by ad- 
ding Section 19 entitled "Regulation of Motor Boats 
and Recreational Vehicles on Baptist Pond" as follows: 

It shall be unlawful for any person to operate a marine or 
recreational vehicle powered by an engine, including 
snowmobiles, on any portion of Baptist Pond at any time; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

SECTION 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the general By-Laws, Article VII-Miscellaneous, Section 
r - Roadside Stands by deleting the word "and" between 
the words rugs and trees and substituting the word "or" 
and further amending said Section 5 by adding the 
following: 

"Any person having a usual place of business within the 
Town may conduct the aforesaid activities on the same 
premises in connection with and accessory to his primary 
business, without obtaining said license." 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws, Article VHI-Waste Disposal, Sec- 
tion 3 - Trash Disposal (Recycling) deleting the word "re- 
quired" between the words "are" and "to" in the first 
sentence and substituting the word "requested" and fur- 
ther amending section 3 by deleting the last sentence in 
its entirety; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to purchase the necessary equipment to im- 
plement a voluntary recycling program; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article VII Miscellaneous by adding 
the following new section: 

Self Service Gas Stations 

1 . Self-service gas stations shall mean that type of gas 
station wherein motor fuel is dispensed by anyone 
other than an employee of the gas station. 

2. Notwithstanding any other provision of this by-law, 
no self-service gas stations shall be permitted in the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

3. No person other than the service station owner or 
an authorized employee shall use or operate any 
motor fuel dispensing equipment at any service sta- 
tion; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows: 

1. Amend Section 2600 Intensity of Use Schedule by 
referencing footnote "d" to the row label "Front 
(feet)". 

2. Amend Article V Definitions by revising the defini- 
tion of "Junk Yard", including deleting the last 
sentence thereof, so that it reads: 

"JUNK YARD" - The use of any area of any lot, 
whether inside or outside of a building, for the 
storage, keeping, or abandonment of junk, scrap, 
or discarded materials, or the dismantling, demoli- 
tion, or abandonment of automobiles, other 
vehicles, machinery, or parts thereof; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the present 
zoning map and substituting the redrafted map proposed 
by the Planning Board, as filed with the Town Clerk, and 
displayed at the Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Town By-Laws by adding a new section to Article VII 
of the existing Town By-Laws; 

SECTION 5. DEMOLITION OF BUILDINGS 

1 . No building shall be demolished in whole or in part in 
the Town of Chelmsford without a permit from the 
Building Inspector, which has been approved by the 
Board of Selectmen. 

2. When an Application for a permit for the demolition 
of a building in whole or in part is made to the Building 
Inspector, the Applicant shall also furnish a copy of the 
request to the Chelmsford Historical Commission and if 
said building is within the boundaries of the Chelmsford 
Historic District(s) a copy of the request shall also be fur- 
nished to the Chelmsford Historical District Commission. 

3. The Chelmsford Historical Commission shall submit a 
written recommendation to the Board of Selectmen and 
the Historic District Commission, if applicable, within 
fourteen (14) days of the receipt of an application for a 
permit to demolish any building in whole or in part. The 
Commission shall base its recommendation upon its 
review of the Historical, archeological, architectural, 
and/or cultural significance of the structure involved. If 
the Historical Commission does not submit a written 
recommendation to the Board of Selectmen, and the 
Historic District Commission, when applicable, they shall 
be deemed to have approved the application for the per- 
mit. 

4. No permit shall be issued for the demolition of any 
building or structure, in whole or in part that is 100 years 
of age or older unless there is a public hearing held 
thereon by the Board of Selectmen. 



21 



5. Notwithstanding anything contained in this By-Law 
to the contrary, the powers and duties of the Chelmsford 
Historic District Commission as established under 
Chapter 40C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, as amended by the Chelmsford Historic 
District By-Law, shall not be amended by this By-Law. 

6. Any violation of this Article shall be punishable by a 
fine of two hundred dollars ($200.00); 

or act in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Historical Society 



ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws by recodifying Subsec- 
tion 3250. Other Requirements (under Environmental 
Protection Standards) as Subsection 3260 and further, by 
adding a new Subsection 3250 to read as follows: 

3250. Solid Waste Storage. Any accessory receptacle 
or structure with holding capacity of at least 100 cubic 
feet for temporary storage or solid or liquid waste 
materials, "including garbage, rubbish, junk, discarded 
bulk items, and similar waste items shall be located not 
less than ten feet from any structure and shall be screened 
from all adjacent premises and streets from which it 
would otherwise be visible in accordance with subsection 
3423 of this By-Law. Screening materials will not be at- 
tached to any structure; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Town of Chelmsford By-Laws Adopted At Town 
Meeting 1977 (Articles 50, 51 , & 52) by changing the type 
of district of a parcel of land on the southerly side of 
Richardson Road, presently zoned single family residen- 
tial district to limited industrial district, said land being 
described as follows: 

Being a parcel of land situated in the Town of Chelms- 
ford and being a portion of the premises conveyed by An- 
drew Boumil to Andrew P. Boumil dated May 23, 1964, 
and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1648, Page 374, described as follows: 

The land in that part of Chelmsford known as North 
Chelmsford, with the buildings thereon, containing 
about six acres, situated on the southerly or southeasterly 
side of the so called Richardson Road, being the Road 
leading from the Old Middlesex Turnpike to the Edward 
F. Richardson farm, and thus bounded: 

Beginning at a stone bound on the southerly side of said 
Road at the northeasterly corner of land formerly of 
Francis Richardson, supposed to be now or formerly of 
one Dunnigan; thence S. 77 2/3 degrees E. on said last 
mentioned land, five hundred thirty-nine and 22/100 
feet to land conveyed by James Pike, Jr. to Nathaniel 
Blood by deed dated February 26, 1849, and recorded 
with Middlesex Deeds (now South District) in Book 556, 
Page 496, supposed to be land of one Richardson, now or 
formerly; thence N. 13 1/4 degrees E. on said last men- 
tioned land, four hundred forty-eight and 80/100 feet to 



land formerly of Joseph Reed, supposed to be now or 
formerly of one Richardson; thence 77 degrees W. on 
said last mentioned land, ninety-one and 15/100 feet to 
an oak stump with stones about it; thence N. 30 degrees 
W. still on said last mentioned land, two hundred ninety- 
five and 02/100 feet to stone bound at said Richardson 
Road; thence Westerly on said Road, seven hundred 
twenty-four and 68/100 feet to the point of beginning; be 
said contents or any or all of said measurements more or 
less and however otherwise said premises may be 
measured, bounded, or described. Excluding and excep- 
ting from this deed any of the aforementioned land that 
has heretofore been conveyed by said Andrew Boumil by 
deed; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws to change from Single 
Residence District (RB) to Roadside (CB) the following 
described land owned by Howard Ryan and Marilyn 
Ryan: A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon 
situated on the Southwesterly side of North Road and 
bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point 
at the intersection of the Southwesterly side of North 
Road with the Southeasterly side of Columbia Street; 
thence running Southeasterly by said North Road two 
hundred and 14/100 (200.14) feet to Richardson Street; 
thence turning and running Southwesterly by said 
Richardson Street two hundred four (204) feet to Lot 
numbered thirty (30) on a plan of land hereinafter men- 
tiond; thence turning and running Northwesterly by said 
Lot numbered thirty (30) and by Lot numbered thirty- 
one (31) on said plan, two hundred (200) feet to Colum- 
bia Street; thence Northeasterly by Columbia Street one 
hundred (100) feet; thence Southeasterly by Lot 
numbered eight (8) and a portion of Lot numbered nine 
(9) seventy-five (75) feet; thence running Northeasterly by 
land now or formerly of Rumley seventy-one (71) feet; 
thence turning and running Northerly by land now or 
formerly of Rumley, being the remaining portions of Lots 
numbered eight (8) and nine (9), on said plan, seventy- 
eight (78) feet more or less to the point of beginning. 

Being Lots numbered ten (10) and eleven (11) and the 
Southerly twenty-five feet of Lot numbered nine (9) and a 
portion of Lot numbered eight (8) and Lots twenty (20), 
twenty-one (21), twenty-eight (28) and twenty-nine (29) 
as shown on plan of land entitled: "Plan of Columbia 
Park, North Chelmsford, Mass., as Surveyed for P.T. 
McMahon, dated July 1902", recorded with North Mid- 
dlesex Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 19, Plan 40; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Zoning By-Laws so that the following parcels of land, 
all located in the North Section of Chelmsford, at the in- 
tersection of Middlesex Street and Church Street be 
rezoned from their present zoning of I A to RM. The 
parcels are those located at 74 Middlesex Street, 80 Mid- 
dlesex Street, 98 Middlesex Street, 102 Middlesex Street; 
on Church Street, 60 Church Street, 61 Church Street 
and 64 Church Street; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



22 



ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, by emi- 
nent domain or purchase a certain parcel of land with the 
trees and structures thereon, adjacent to the land of the 
Town of Chelmsford known as the Swain Road Landfill, 
said land owned now or formerly by Manfred and Caro- 
lina Abrahamson containing approximately 41,761 
square feet of land and being a portion of a parcel 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 740 at Page 382; said 
portion to be purchased or taken being set forth on a plan 
entitled "Sketch Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. 
prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, scale 1 in. = 100 
feet December 1977, Emmons, Fleming and Bienvenu, 
Engineers and Surveyors," and for the purpose of acquir- 
ing said land and for the purposes of paying, in whole or 
in part, any damages for which the Town may be liable 
by reason of the taking of said land by eminent domain, 
to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or 
transfer from available funds a certain sum of money; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, by emi- 
nent domain or purchase a certain parcel of land with the 
trees and structures thereon, adjacent to the land of the 
Town of Chelmsford known as the Swain Road Landfill, 
said land owned now or formerly by Frederick Abraham - 
son containing 45,284 square feet of land and being a 
portion of a parcel described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1060 
at Page 72; said portion to be purchased or taken being 
set forth on a plan entitled "Sketch Plan of Land in 
Chelmsford, Mass. prepared for the Town of Chelms- 
ford, scale 1 in=100 feet, December 1977, Emmons, 
Fleming and Bienvenu, Engineers and Surveyors," and 
for the purpose of acquiring said land and for the pur- 
poses of paying, in whole or in part, any damages for 
which the Town may be liable by reason of the taking of 
said land by eminent domain, to see if the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds 
a certain sum of money; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, by emi- 
nent domain or purchase a certain parcel of land with the 
trees and structures thereon, adjacent to the land of the 
Town of Chelmsford known as the Swain Road Landfill, 
said land owned by Lennart W. Leedberg, Jr. and Paul- 
ine R. Leedberg containing approximately 48,806 square 
feet of land and being a portion of a parcel described in 
the Assessors Maps as Plat 70 Lot 17; said portion to be 
purchased or taken being set forth on a plan entitled 
"Sketch Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. prepared for 
the Town of Chelmsford, scale 1 in. = 100 ft, December 
1977, Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Engineers & Sur- 
veyors," and for the purpose of acquiring said land and 
for the purpose of paying, in whole or in part, any 
damages for which the Town may be liable by reason of 
the taking of said land by eminent domain, to see if the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 



available funds a certain sum of money; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 61 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple, by emi- 
nent domain or purchase a certain parcel of land with the 
trees and structures thereon adjacent to land of the Town 
of Chelmsford known as the Swain Road Landfill, said 
land owned now or formerly by Manuel S. and Maria C. 
Moreira containing approximately 78,955 square feet of 
land and being a portion of a parcel described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in 
Book 2179 at Page 214; said portion to be purchased or 
taken being set forth on a plan entitled "Sketch Plan of 
Land in Chelmsford, Mass. prepared for the Town of 
Chelmsford, scale 1 in. = 100 ft., December 1977, Em- 
mons, Fleming and Bienvenu, Engineers and Surveyors," 
and for the purposes of paying, in whole or in part, any 
damages for which the Town may be liable by reason of 
the taking of said land by eminent domain, to see if the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a certain sum of money; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the General By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations by 

adding the following section: 

Section . Prohibition on Leaving Motor Vehicles in 
Certain Public Ways; 

1. It shall be unlawful to leave any motor vehicle un- 
attended within the limits of any private way fur- 
nishing means of access for fire apparatus to any 
building. 

2. It shall be unlawful to obstruct or park a motor 
vehicle in any fire lane, such Fire Lane to be 
designated by the Chief of the Fire Department and 
shall be posted as such. Said Fire Lane to be a 
distance of eighteen (18) feet from all buildings in 
any shopping center, bowling alley, theatre, nurs- 
ing home, office building, or other public building. 
The establishment of Fire Lanes as set forth above 
shall be at the sole discretion of the Chief of the Fire 
Department. 

3. The record owner of each building, upon notifica- 
tion of the designation of a Fire Lane by the Chief 
of the Fire Department, shall provide and install 
signs posting the area as such as provided in para- 
graph 2. 

4. The police department and all members thereof 
assigned to traffic duty, are hereby authorized to 
remove and tow away, or have removed and towed 
away by commercial towing service, at the sole ex- 
pense of the owner of said motor vehicle, any motor 
vehicle left unattended or parked in any designated 
Fire Lane or within the limits of any private way 
furnishing means of access for fire apparatus to any 
building. Motor vehicles so towed away shall be 
stored in a safe place and restored to the owner or 



23 



operator thereof upon payment by the owner or 
operator of the expenses incurred in said removal 
and storage. 
5. Violations of this by-law shall be punishable as pro- 
vided in General By-Laws Article 1. 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the following mentioned streets as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen and shown by their reports and plans duly 
filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of reconstructing the following 
mentioned streets: 

Wagontrail Road Extension 

Lovett Lane 

Lafayette Terrace 
Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such require- 
ments have been met; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of 
land, for consideration to be determined in a parcel of 
land and buildings thereon, if any, located on Stearns 
Street as shown on Assessors Map Plat 241, Lot 258; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of 
land, for consideration to be determined in a parcel of 
land and buildings thereon, if any, located on Bentley 
Lane Plat 204 Lot 28A containing approximately .08 
acres and Plat 204 Lot 29A containing approximately .08 
acres; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of 
land, for consideration to be determined in a parcel of 
land and buildings thereon, if any, located on Turnpike 
Road and Mill Road containing approximately 1 .61 acres 
shown on Assessors Maps Plat 127 as Lot 72; or act in 
relation thereto. 



123 containing approximately 37,973 square feet of land; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 
the Board of Assessors to issue a certain sum of money 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
tax rate for the current fiscal period; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Finance Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 22nd day of March, A.D. 
1979 

William R. Murphy, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



March 29, 1979 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford 
Road, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of 
land, for consideration to be determined in a parcel of 
land and buildings thereon, if any, located on River- 
meadow Road as shown on Assessors Map Plat 130 Lot 



24 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 14, 1979 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or other suitable person of the Town of 
Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Monday Evening, the fourteenth 
day of May, 1979, at 7:35 p.m. o'clock then and there to 
act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey all right, title and in- 
terest, if any, held by the Town in a certain parcel of land 
with buidings thereon, for consideration to be determin- 
ed, in a parcel of land located on School Street, being the 
same premises described in two deeds to the Inhabitants 
of the Town of Chelmsford and recorded in the Mid- 
dlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 69, Page 
46 and Book 1463, Page 324 containing, according to 
said deeds, 1 acre and 1.38 acres respectively, all as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, 
Mass., prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1 
inch = 40 feet, July 1976, Emmons, Fleming and 
Bienvenu Inc., Engineers and Surveyors" Recorded in 
said Registry of Deeds at Plan Book 123, Plan 7, or to 
convey any portion thereof; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$50,000.00 to the New High School Construction Ac- 
count; or act in relation thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the engineering design and study and 
the installation of traffic control devices at the inter- 
section of Billerica Road and Chelmsford Streets; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the 
Cemetery Department, such purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to dispose of certain 
equipment presently being used by the Cemetery Depart- 
ment as follows: 



1. To purchase one (1) Tractor - Loader - Backhoe 

2. To sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) In- 
ternational Model 2444 Loader-backhoe presently 
being used by the Cemetery Department 

3. To purchase one (1) 3/4 ton Pick-up Truck with 
plow; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Cemetery Commissioners 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of aerial spraying or other 
action for the control of mosquitoes under the supervision 
of the Board of Health; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to direct the 
Board of Selectmen to take such action as may be 
necessary for the Town to withdraw from the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Program; or act in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 30th day of April, A.D, 
1979 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Bonita Towle 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Chelmford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS 



April 30, 1979 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - AH Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford 
Road, fourteen days at least before the time appointed 
for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



25 

TOWN ELECTION 

April 7, 1979 



SELECTMAN 3 years 
Kenneth Demers 
Peter Dulchinos 
Ann D. Lloyd 
Kevin A. Burke 
Stanley W. Norkunas 
Bonita Towle 
Bradford O. Emerson 
James M. Brooks 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

ASSESSOR S yrs 

Julian H Zabierek (reelection) 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 Pet 2 Pet 3 Pet 4 Pet 5 Pet 6 Pet 7 Pcy 8 Pet 9 Pet 10 Pet 1 1 Pet 12 Total 



30 


16 


35 


13 


32 


24 


27 


39 


25 


40 


23 


69 


373 


171 


75 


244 


39 


152 


136 


69 


127 


103 


156 


96 


224 


1592 


47 


27 


54 


9 


56 


51 


26 


28 


18 


65 


32 


42 


455 


37 


16 


38 


13 


53 


33 


17 


38 


19 


43 


30 


60 


397 


96 


215 


194 


29 


112 


102 


145 


95 


58 


93 


87 


129 


1355 


258 


127 


195 


219 


215 


232 


121 


162 


123 


242 


216 


207 


2317 


386 


128 


295 


150 


336 


278 


180 


248 


181 


275 


290 


319 


3066 


19 


8 


5 


15 


17 


26 


9 


7 


8 


15 


13 


17 


159 


106 


98 


104 


69 


117 


82 


70 


102 


51 


83 


107 


HI 


1100 


1105 


710 


1164 


556 


1090 


964 


664 


846 


586 


1012 


894 


1178 


10814 


459 


273 


427 


222 


418 


402 


274 


324 


214 


372 


383 


449 


4217 


116 


82 


155 


56 


127 


80 


58 


99 


79 


134 


64 


140 


1190 



575 



355 



582 



278 



545 



482 



332 



423 



293 



506 



447 



589 5407 



BOARD OF HEALTH 3 yrs 
Paul F. McCarthy (re election) 
Write ins 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 3 yrs 
Kenneth C. Taylor 
Myra Silver (reelection) 
Write ins 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



456 


264 


434 


215 


420 


390 


252 


327 


216 


356 


345 


449 


4124 


1 




1 










1 






1 




4 


118 


91 
355 


147 
582 


63 

278 


125 
545 


92 
482 


80 
332 


95 
423 


77 
293 


150 
506 


101 
447 


140 


1279 


575 


589 


5407 


240 


170 


267 


128 


214 


207 


172 


173 


135 


220 


184 


232 


2342 


291 


152 


276 


105 


275 


237 


141 


218 


139 


247 


234 


320 


2635 


1 


















1 






2 


43 


33 


39 


45 


56 


38 


19 


32 


19 


38 


29 


37 


428 


575 


355 


582 


278 


545 


482 


332 


423 


293 


506 


447 


589 


5407 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECH. 3 yrs 
HIGH SCHOOL DIST. 
Louis E. Kelly (reelection) 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



457 
118 



575 



261 
94 



355 



418 
164 



212 
66 



414 
131 



389 
93 



259 
73 



319 
104 



209 
84 



353 
153 



349 
98 



582 



278 



545 



482 



332 



423 



293 



506 



447 



435 
154 



4075 
1332 



589 5407 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 3 yrs 
Everett V. Olsen (reelection) 
Write-in 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

PARK COMMISSIONER 3 yrs 
Robert L. Wetmore 
Write-in 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

LIBRARY TRUSTEE 3 yrs 

David E. Kelch 

James W. Cooper 

Alan P. Murphy 

Roger P. Welch (re-electioiv) 

Write-ins 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

LIBRARY TRUSTEE 1 yr 
Brenda M. McDermott 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

PLANNING BOARD 3 yrs 

Roaslind M. Boyle 

Henrick R. Johnson. Jr. (re election) 

G. David Hall 

William E. Delaney III 

Harold J. Garrow 

Charles A Parlee 

Charles K. McLaughlin 

Arthur I. Reade 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISSIONER 
Burton A. Segall 
Write-in 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



468 


278 


447 


221 


423 


405 

1 

76 


284 


321 


223 


373 


360 


453 


4256 

1 

1150 


107 


77 


135 


57 


122 


48 


102 


70 


133 


87 


136 


575 


355 


582 


278 


545 


482 


332 


423 


293 


506 


447 


589 


5407 


441 

1 

133 


277 


426 


213 


412 


391 


272 


321 


213 


353 


354 


434 

1 

154 


4107 

2 

1298 


78 


156 


65 


133 


91 


60 


102 


80 


153 


93 





f— 
























575 


355 


582 


278 


545 


482 


332 


423 


293 


506 


447 


589 


5407 


182 


87 


247 


56 


161 


126 


87 


133 


66 


132 


106 


221 


1604 


181 


106 


183 


76 


168 


145 


132 


125 


80 


158 


137 


183 


1674 


139 


97 


131 


85 


153 


168 


92 


161 


101 


137 


142 


163 


1569 


399 


240 


329 


191 


322 


324 


230 


230 


190 


304 


286 


346 

1 

264 


3391 

1 

2575 


249 


180 


274 


148 


286 


201 . 


123 


197 


149 


281 


223 


1150 


710 


1164 


556 


1090 


964 


664 


846 


586 


1012 


894 


1178 


10814 


437 


266 


442 


202 


396 


392 


265 


317 


217 


376 


344 


440 


4094 


138 


89 


140 


76 


149 


90 


67 


106 


76 


130 


103 


149 


1313 


575 


355 


582 


278 


545 


482 


332 


423 


293 


506 


447 


589 


5407 


113 


88 


188 


68 


124 


111 


69 


145 


89 


122 


67 


204 


1388 


355 


195 


325 


162 


294 


312 


209 


248 


174 


308 


279 


327 


3188 


52 


49 


61 


29 


112 


54 


40 


39 


36 


68 


37 


62 


639 


102 


72 


103 


90 


81 


167 


64 


70 


63 


105 


204 


107 


1228 


161 


72 


81 


38 


178 


102 


81 


82 


85 


122 


83 


116 


1201 


371 


217 


354 


179 


344 


305 


213 


258 


168 


303 


279 


402 


3393 


69 


43 


115 


49 


54 


67 


59 


70 


33 


52 


50 


100 


761 


160 


62 


133 


38 


115 


109 


71 


90 


54 


108 


71 


147 


1158 


342 


267 


386 


181 


333 


219 


190 


267 


177 


330 


271 


302 


3265 


1725 


1065 


1746 


834 


1635 


1446 


996 


1269 


879 


1518 


1341 


1767 


16221 


399 


249 


394 


196 


387 


376 


248 


296 


195 


320 


338 


410 


3808 


2 














1 




1 


1 




5 


174 


106 


188 


82 


158 


106 


84 


126 


98 


185 


108 


179 


1594 


575 


355 


582 


278 


545 


482 


332 


423 


293 


506 


447 


589 


5407 



26 



255 


171 


293 


130 


227 


238 


159 


162 


142 


220 


192 


260 


2449 


242 


148 


241 


103 


253 


188 


147 


210 


121 


288 


201 


278 


2360 


78 


36 


48 


45 


65 


56 


26 


51 


30 


58 


54 


51 


598 



QUESTION #1 
Yes 

No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 575 355 582 278 545 482 332 423 293 506 447 589 5407 

QUESTION #2 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



169 


87 


185 


63 


174 


135 


87 


120 


88 


156 


101 


203 


1568 


356 


241 


370 


183 


333 


315 


219 


278 


189 


308 


300 


359 


3451 


50 


27 


27 


32 


38 


32 


26 


25 


16 


42 


46 


27 


388 


575 


355 


582 


278 


545 


482 


332 


423 


293 


506 


447 


589 


5407 



27 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 30, 1979 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:55 
PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 609 voters 
present. Selectman Emerson moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Select- 
man Emerson then moved that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator then gave a brief explanation of the 
Town Meeting process. He explained the functions of the 
different appointed and elected officials concerning the 
Town Meeting actions. 

The Moderator then recognized the Elected and Ap- 
pointed Students from the Chelmsford High School Town 
Government Day event which will be on Friday May 1 1th, 
1979. They are as follows: 



Board of Selectmen 

John Walker, Chairman 
Kate Bolger 
Chris McKeown 
Cindy Teele 
Mary Woods 

Board of Health 

George Barnard 
Lorraine Brooks 
Ron Gruber 



Town Accountant 

Brian Smith 

Planning Board 

Ronnie Barth 
Theresa Kilmartin 
Laurie Semia 

Police Chief 

Allen Mello 

Administrative Assistant 
Paula Young 



School Committee 

Paul Clancy, Chairman 
Sara Kent 
Michele McKeown 
Marie Rossi 
Doreen Sullivan 

Town Clerk 

Dan Wilkins 

Town Treasurer 

Janet Kelley 

Superintendent of Schools 

Betty Conrad 

Board of Assessors 

Laura Paisley 
Chris Murphy 
Kellie Lynch 

Fire Chief 

Joshua Royte 

Superintendent of Streets 
Mark Goggin 



Selectman Hart moved to recess the Annual Town 
Meeting and to conduct a Public Budget hearing on the 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds. 

It was so voted. 

George Ripsom of the Finance Committee proposes 
that the Federal Revenue Sharing Funds totaling $775,- 
000. which will be available for use in fiscal 1979-1980, 
be allocated as follows: 



ARTICLE 3. 

Fire Department Salaries 
Police Department Salaries 

TOTAL 



$305,367.00 
469,633.00 

775,000.00 



These transfers and appropriations will be through ap- 
proval of the respective departmental budgets as they are 
brought before the Town Body for action. 

The sum of $775,000. represents approximately $2.74 
on the tax rate. 

As required by the public participation regulations for 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds, the Finance Committee 
did conduct a "Proposed Use Hearing" on March 13, 
1979 as advertised in the Chelmsford Newsweekly 
publication of March 1 , 1979. This hearing was intended 
to provide a forum for discussing the possible use of 
Revenue Sharing Funds with the public prior to the 
budget being presented to the legislative body (Town 
Meeting). The number of public participants however, 
who did attend this meeting was none. 

Mr. Ripsom then asked the Town Meeting Body if 
there were any questions concerning the Federal Revenue 
Sharing Funds. Hearing none, Selectman Hart moved to 
close the Public hearing on the Federal Revenue Sharing 
Funds. It was so voted. 

The Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 8:15 P.M. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Hart moved that the 
reports of Town Officers and Committees be heard. 

The Varney Playground Commission had an opening 
for a three year term. The Moderator opened nomina- 
tions for the office. Selectman Hart nominated Robert 
McManimon for this position. The Moderator asked for 
any more nominations. Hearing none Selectman Hart 
moved to close nominations. It was so voted by voice. The 
Town Meeting Body then voted on Robert McManimon 
for the position on Varney Playground Commission. It 
was so voted by voice. 



UNDER ARTICLE 2 Barbara Ward of the Personnel 
Board moved to amend the Personnel Wage and Salary 
Administration By-Law. The Finance Committee is in 
favor for passage of the article. 

Barbara Ward asked that David McLachlan the past 
Chairman of the Personnel Board speak on certain parts 
of this amendment. 

Mr. McLachlan presented a brief explanation. Mrs. 
Ward then explained the rest of the amendment. 

The Moderator asked if there was any discussion to be 
heard under article 2? 

Mr. Dennis McHugh, Library Trustee moved to 
amend this article by deleting numbers 2,4,5, and sub- 
mitting in their place the provisions of article 2B. Mr. 
McHugh explained why he wanted this article amended. 

The Moderator asked the Finance Committee for their 
recommendation on this amendment. The Finance Com- 
mittee was against the amendment. A lengthy discussion 
took place. The Moderator took a voice vote on this 
amendment. 



28 



Motion Carried. 

Mr. Bouknight questioned the voice vote, and re- 
quested a hand count. The following tellers were ap- 
pointed: 



Connie Fabien 
Margaret Johnson 
Paul Bienvenu 
Ray Dunn 
Edward Hilliard 
Ruth Delaney 



Richard Burtt 

Bob Monaco 

Ron Wikander 

Dorothy Lerer 

Norman LaBreque 

Edward Marshall 



Bill Murphy 



The result of the hand count Yes 213 No 255. The mo- 
tion to amend article 2 is defeated, and as a result of this 
vote, article 2B is also defeated. 

Mr. Norman LaBreque moved to delete number 7 sec- 
tion 27 in its entirety. 

A voice vote was taken, Motion Defeated. 

Selectman Shanahan moved to amend number 4, 
Under section 7 by deleting the word unanimous in the 
first sentence and add the word majority. And in the se- 
cond paragraph of the same section remove the first 
sentence in its entirety. 

A discussion followed concerning the motion to 
amend. 

A voice vote was taken on the motion. The voice vote 
left the chair in doubt, the tellers came forward. Result of 
the hand count Yes 284 No 199, Motion carried to 
amend. 

A voice vote was taken on the main motion as amended 
in its entirety. Motion Carried. 



ARTICLE 2 as amended reads as follows: 

1. Under Section 3 subtitled PERSONNEL BOARD, 
delete the fourth paragraph and substitute the 
following in its place: "No public member of the 
Personnel Board may be an employee of the Town 
nor hold Town Office whether appointed or 
elected. 

The Personnel Member of the Personnel Board 
may not hold town office whether appointed or 
elected but may otherwise be an employee who is 
subject to this by-law." 

2. Under Section 4 subtitled SCOPE OF PLAN AND 
AUTHORITY OF THE PERSONNEL BOARD, 

amend subparagraph (c) by adding the following 
"The Board shall have authority to decide all ques- 
tions relating to the application of this by-law, and 
to set the grade levels, salary ranges, and rates of 
pay for all positions under its jurisdiction." 

3. Under Section 6 subtitled CLASSIFICATION OF 
PRESENT TOWN EMPLOYEES, delete subpara- 
graph (b) and (c) and amend the remaining sub- 



paragraphs by relettering as follows: (d) to be (b); 
(e) to be (c); (f) to be (d) and (g) to be (e). 

4. Under section 7 subtitled CLASSIFICATION OF 
NEW EMPLOYEES, delete the subtitle and sub- 
stitute the subtitle HIRING OF NEW EMPLOY- 
EES and further amend said section by deleting 
subparagraph 7 (a) and substituting the following: 
"The wage or salary of a new employee may be set 
by an appointed or elected Board provided the 
Board is in majority agreement and the salary is 
between Step 1 and Step 6. 

The wage or salary of a new employee supervised by 
an appointed or elected individual must be approv- 
ed by the Personnel Board. 

5. Under Section 8 subtitled INCREASES WITH 
GRADE LEVELS, amend the subtitle by adding 
the words "and Promotions" and further amend 
section 8 by adding subparagraph (c) as follows: (c) 
The promotion of an employee must be approved 
by the Personnel Board. An employee receiving a 
promotion shall be placed in the step of the new 
grade which corresponds closest to the salary he 
would have received from a 4 step increase in his 
previous grade level or the minimum of his new 
grade level, whichever is higher. 

6. Under Section 19 subtitled HOURS OF WORK 
SHALL BE AS FOLLOWS, delete the subtitle and 
substitute the subtitle HOURS OF WORK and fur- 
ther amend section 8 by deleting subparagraphs AI 
and All and substitute the following: 

A. Full-time permanent members 

I. Positions classified as Administrative and 

Clerical - 37 14 hours per week 
II. Conservation, Parks and Cemetery - 40 

hours per week; 
III. Custodial - 40 hours per week; 
IV. Library - 37V6 hours per week; 
V. Youth Center - 37 J /6 hours per week 

7. And further amending said by-Law by adding the 
following section: 

Section 27. EMPLOYMENT OF RELATIVE: No 
person will be employed in a department which has 
a member of his or her immediate family as another 
employee or in a department which is governed by 
an appointing authority or elected official who is a 
member of his or her immediate family without 
Personnel Board approval. The immediate family 
means husband, wife, grandparent, parent, 
children, brother, sister, mother-in-law, father-in- 
law, brother-in-law, or sister-in-law. This section is 
effective as of the date of enactment and does not 
affect prior existing relationships. 

8. And further amending said by-law by adding the 
following section: 

Section 28. ADVERTISEMENT FOR OPENINGS 
OF JOBS: Openings for positions under the juris- 
diction of the Personnel Board will be posted on 



29 



bulletin boards at Town Hall, Adams Library, 
McKay Library, School Superintendent's Office, 
and in Local newspapers by the department filling 
the position. These openings should include the ti- 
tle of the job, a brief job description and salary level 
and salary range for the job and how and where ap- 
plications for employment should be made. A copy 
of the opening and subsequent filling of the posi- 
tion should be forwarded to the Personnel Board. 

9. Under section 6 Subtitled present classifications of 
present Town Employees amend Section g WAGE 
AND SALARY SCHEDULE to read as follows: 

Wage and Salary Schedule 
July 1, 1979- June 30, 1980 



Grade Level 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



Salary Range 

$ 6,300-8,694 
7,245-9,998 
8,190-11,302 
9,135-12,606 
10,080-13,910 
11,025 15,215 
11,970-16,519 
12,915 17,823 
13.860 19,127 
14,805-20,431 
15,750-21,735 
16,695-23,039 
17,640-24,343 
18,585-25,647 
19,530-26,951 
20,475-28,256 
21,420-29,560 
22,365-30,864 

23,310-32,168 
24,255-33,472 



10. Under section 8, subtitled INCREASES WITH 
GRADE LEVELS, add paragraph (c) as follows: 

(c) An increase shall be granted to each employee 
governed by the By-Law on the first day of the fiscal 
year equal to the percentage increase approved by 
Town Meeting to the Salary Ranges specified in 
Section 6 paragraph G. 

11. Under Section 8 subtitled INCREASES WITHIN 
GRADE LEVELS, amend paragraph (a) as follows: 

"(a) A step increase in rate for any employee who is 
above Step 1 will be effective on the employee's an- 
niversary date and must be recommended by the 
employee's department head, appointing authority 
or elected official and be approved by the Personnel 
Board." 

12. Under Section 24, subtitled "JOB TITLES AND 
STANDING RATES FOR WAGES AND SALA- 
RIES OF THE PERSONNEL WAGE AND SAL 
ARY BY-LAW", by deleting therefrom the follow- 
ing positions under Library, 5. Librarian Special- 
ist, and adding the following positions: 5. Library 
Specialist-Bookkeeper, 6. Library Specialist-Cata- 



loger, 7. Library Specialist-Reference Librarian, 8. 
Library Specialist-Secretary Receptionist, under 
Town Police Department, 3. Captain, under 
Recreation, 1. Recreation Director, under 
Miscellaneous, 9. Local Inspector, Van Driver 
maintenance Man, COA. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A Mrs. Barbara Ward of the Per 
sonnel Board moved that the Town vote to further amend 
Section 24, subtitled "JOB TITLES AND STANDARD 
RATES FOR WAGES AND SALARIES OF THE PER 
SONNEL WAGE AND SALARY BY-LAW", to conform 
to rates of pay negotiated by the Town with certain labor 
organizations, pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 150E. 







Current 


Cur. 


Prop. 


Proposed 






7/78-6/79 


Level 


Level 


Salurv 


\(l 


ministrative &.- Clerical 








7/79-6/80 


1. 


Veteran's Agent 


$12,792 p. a. 


8 


8 




•> 


Clerk Senior 


9.396 p a 


4 


4 




'1 


Clerk 


*#1 






•#1 


1 


Town Accountant 


18.126 p. a. 


12 


12 




-, 




10.752 pa 


5 


5 




6. 


Town Counsel 


500 p .i 






500 p.a 


7. 




1-1.256 pa. 


9 


9 




8. 


Board of Registrars' Clerk 


850 p a 






850 pa 


9 


Bel Key three members 


360 eat h 






360 ea. 


10 


Clerk part time 


3.81 hr. 


2 


o 




1 1 


Town Aide 


10.368 p.a. 

10.752 pa. 


5 


5 




12 


Assistant Town Clerk 


5 


5 




13 


Adm Asst to Assessors 












Assessor 


10.752 p.a. 


5 


5 





Conservation, Parks & Cemctcrv 

1 Cemetery Superintendent 16.104 p.a. 

2 Su pi Insect & Pest Control .1.250 p.a 

3 Landst aper Park 

4. Laborer Park 

5 Unskilled Laborer 2.65hr.*#4 
6. Skilled Forest Workman 
Conservation 

7 Equipment Operator. Cemetery.. 6.00 hr 

8 Park Superintendent 16.104 p.a. 

Custodial 

1 Custodian 4.16 hr. 
Library 

I. Library Director 16.536p.a. 

2 Library Asst. Director 11.856 p.a 
3. Branch Librarian 10.944 p.a 
1 Librarian. Dept. Head 4.14 hr 

5. Librarian Spec. Bkpr 3.98 hr 

6. Library Spec. Catalogcr 3.98 hr 
7 Library Spec. Ref. Lib. 3.98hr 

8. Library Spec Sec. Rec . 3.98 hr 

9. Librarian Assistants 3 56 hr 

10 Librarian Clerk 3.74 hr 

11 Aides *#4 2.65hr 

12 Supervisor Maintenanc e 10.614 p.a 

Highway Department 

1. Highway Superintendent 21.332p.a. 

2. Highway Foreman 7.21 hr. 

3. Administrative Asst. 

Town Fire Department 



2 


2 


1 


1 


#2 


#4. 


1 
4 


1 
4 


9 


9 



1.250 pa 



#4. #2 2.90 hr 



1. Fire Chief 28.504 p.a. 

2 Deputy Fire Chief 23.943 p.a. 

3. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 6.34 hr. 



Town Police Department 

1. Police Chief 
2 Deputy Chief 
3. Captain 



27,408p.a 
22.195 p.a. 



12 
7 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
•#2 
4 



12 

9 

#1 



*#2 #5 

*#2. #6 
6 



•#2.#5 
*#2.#7 



12 
7 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
•#2 
4 



12 

9 
#1 



#2. #5 

#2. #6 

6 



#4 2 90 hr. 



20 
18 
16 



30 



Recreation 










1 . Recreation Director 




7 




2. Clerk. Pan time 


3.81 hi 


2 2 




3. Summei Director 


140 wl 


#2 #2 


147 wk. 




Minimum 


Maximum 




1 Swimming Director 


76 10 wk. 


109.20 wk 


*#2 


r > Swimming Inst rut tor 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 wk. 


•#2 


f>. Playground Director 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 wk. 


•#2 


7. Playground Sup\sr 


76.40 wk. 


109 20 wk 


•#2 


8. Playground Inst. 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 wk 


*#2 


9. Sports Instrui tor 


76.40 wk. 


109.20 wk. 


*#2 


Youth Center 








1 . Youth Center Coordinator 


12.084 p. c 


7 7 




2. Youth Center Supervisor 


3.70 h 


2 2 




3, Clerk Youth 


3.81 h 


2 2 




Miscellaneous 










1.000 p a 


*#2 #2 






17.777 p 


a 


10 10 






3.750 p 


.i 


•#2 #2 






15.312p 


a 


9 9 




5. Sealer of Wghts. & Mcas. 


2.000 p 


a 


*#2 #2 




6 Dot; Officer 


. . . .8.142 p 


.i 


2 2 






6.480 p 


.i 


1 1 




8. Clock Winder 


100 p 


a 


*#2 #2 




9. Local Inspector 








10. Van Driver & Maim Man 


COA 






Footnotes 











*#] Represented by Collective Bargaining Union 

*#2 Not in "Job Rating Plan" 

*#3 No percentage increase range only 

*#4 Federal Minimum Hour Wage 

*#fi Salarv will be 200% of the highest paid union firefighter established by State 

law 

*#6 Salarv will be 84% of the Fire Chief 

The Moderator called for a Voice vote on article 2 A. 

Motion Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2B Mr. Dennis McHugh, Library 
Trustee moved to withdraw this article. Motion Carried 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Paul Hart moved that 
the Town vote to Raise and Appropriate such sums of 
money as may be required to defray town charges for the 
fiscal period from July 1, 1979 to June 30, 1980. Chair- 
man of the Finance Committee, George Ripsom asked 
the Town Meeting body that because of no decision of the 
Pending Tax Cap bill, that the Town Meeting body vote 
on all budget and warrant articles either by unanimous 
Voice vote or a 2/3's hand vote count be taken. 

Finance Committee Recommendation 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

1. Accountant $19,283.00 

2. Senior Clerk (3) 29,178.00 

3. Vacation and Sickness 1.00 

Total 48,462.00 

Expenses: 

4. Expenses 1 ,500.00 

5. Outlay 175.00 

Total 1,675.00 

TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 50,137.00 
Motion Carried, unanimously 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

6. Inspector's Salary 1,000.00 

7. Expense 100.00 

TOTAL ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPT. 1,100.00 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

8. Clerk hire 2,653.00 

9. Expenses 2,343.00 

10. Outlay Account 00.00 

TOTAL BOARD OF APPEALS 4,996.00 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

ASSESSOR'S 

11. Assessor (Full Time) 18,571.00 

12. Board Member (Part Time) 8,917.00 

13. Adm. Assistant 11,129.00 

14. Senior Clerk (2) 1 Clerk Level 1 27,205.00 

15. CM. A. Compensation 1,000.00 

Total 66,822.00 

Expenses 

16. Office Expenses 5,365.00 

17. Transportation 1,000.00 

18. Outlay's 110.00 

19. Data Proc (Tax Billing) 5,000.00 

Total 11,475.00 

TOTAL ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT 78,297.00 
Motion Carried, unanimously 



0.00 
0.00 



BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMM. 

20. Expenses- Annual Operation 

21. Accumulation Fund (1975-1976) 

TOTAL BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATIO N COM. 0.00 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Norman LeBreque moved to amend Line item 23 from 
$13,000 to $1.00. He felt that the only way we control a 
budget, was to control the number of personnel in a 
budget. The Finance Committee was not in favor of the 
amendment. Selectman Carson spoke in favor of the posi- 
tion as did Ronald Wikander. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote on Mr. LeBreque's motion to amend. The mo- 
tion was defeated. A voice vote was taken on the entire 
Building Inspector's Department, Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

BUILDING INSPECTORS DEPARTMENT 
Includes: Zoning By-Law Enforcement 

22. Inspector's Salary 18,945.00 

23. Local Inspector 13,000.00 

24. Sr. Clerk 9,726.00 

25. Vacation & Sickness 1.00 

26. Transportation 2,200.00 

27. Inspector's Expenses 2,500.00 

28. Out of Town Expenses 275.00 

29. Plumbing Insp. (Fees & Transfers) 1,500.00 

TOTAL BLDG. INSP. DEPT. 



48,147.00 



31 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Dr. Everett Olsen, Cemetery Commissioner, moved to 
amend the Line item #31 Superintendent's Salary from 
$17,176.00 to $18,000.00. Barbara Ward of the Person- 
nel Board spoke against the motion. The Moderator call- 
ed for a Voice vote on Dr. Olsen's motion. Motion 
defeated. Moderator asked for a Voice vote on the entire 
Cemetery Dept. Motion Carried, unanimously. 



51. High School 
51a High School 

Debt Total 



1972 #1 
1972 #2 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

30. Commissioners (3) 

31. Superintendent 

32. General Labor 

33. Special Labor for Lot Owners 

Total 

35. Transportation 

36. Expenses 
Outlays 

37. Out of State 

38. Restore Historical Cemeteries 

Total 
TOTAL CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

39. Expenses 

40. Outlays 

TOTAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

41. Expenses 

TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

CONSTABLE 

42. Constable's Salary 

TOTAL CONSTABLE'S DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

42A Salaries 

43. Expenses 

44. Transportation Expenses 

TOTAL COUNCIL ON AGING 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

DEBT AND INTEREST 

Principal Payments: 

45. High School Loan No. 1 

46. High School Loan No. 2 

47. South Row Elementary School Loan 

48. Junior High School Loan 

49. Westland Elem. School and 
Harrington Elem School Loan 

50. Byam Elementary School Loan 



300.00 

17,176.00 

50,733.00 

1,000.00 

74,209.00 

1,000.00 
12,275.00 

4,728.00 

300.00 

11,500.00 

19,803.00 
94,012.00 



4,600.00 
1,150.00 

5,750.00 



14,140.00 



14,140.00 



Interest: 

52. High School Loan No. 1 

53. High School Loan No. 2 

54. Anticipation of Revenue and 
Reimbursement Loans 

55. South Row Elem. School Loan 

56. Junior High School 

57. Westland Elem. School and 
Harrington Elem. School Loan 

58. Byam Elementary School Loan 

59. High School- 1972 #1 
59a. High School- 1972#2 

Interest Total 

TOTAL DEBT AND INTEREST 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

DOG OFFICER 

60. Dog Officer 

61 . Assistant Dog Officer 

62. Expenses 

TOTAL DOG OFFICER 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

63. Expenses 

TOTAL EDWARDS MEM. BEACH 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

ELECTIONS 

64. Wages and Expenses 

TOTAL ELECTIONS DEPT. 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



850,000.00 
240,000.00 

1,510,000.00 



0.00 
0.00 

50,000.00 

3,150.00 

17,063.00 

57,620.00 
64,650.00 

130.900.00 
23,520.00 

346,903.00 

1,856,903.00 



8,693.00 
6,846.00 
1,600.00 

17,139.00 



1,000.00 
1,000.00 



12,150.00 
12,150.00 



150.00 


bo. expenses 
TOTAL FINANCE COMMITTEE 


1.3UU.UU 




1,500.00 


150.00 


Motion Carried, unanimously 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 




9,000.00 


66. Officers and Administration 


151,372.00 


8,300.00 


67. Regular and Substitute Account 


1,186,504.00 


3,000.00 


68. Severance Pay 


0.00 


20,300.00 


Total 
Expenses: 


1,337,876.00 




69. Maintenance and Equipment 


63,600.00 




70. Outlays 


4,950.00 




71. Out of State 


400.00 


0.00 


72. Stabilization Fund (Equipment) 


19,000.00 


0.00 


Total 


87,950.00 


45,000.00 






110,000.00 


Total Fire Department 
Appropriations from Federal Revenue 


1,425,826.00 


160,000.00 


Sharing for Salaries 


305,367.00 


105,000.00 


COST TO THE TOWN 


1,120,459.00 



32 



After much discussion the Moderator attempted a voice 
vote on this budget, a hand count was taken Yes 298 No 
34, the budget passes 

GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT 

73. Inspectors Salary 4,000.00 

74. Expenses 624.00 

75. Transportation 1,000.00 

76. Out of Town Expenses 50.00 

77. Vacation and Sickness 1.00 

TOTAL GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPT. 5,675.00 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

HEALTH & SANITATION DEPARTMENT 

Peter Dulchinos, Member of the Board of Health, moved 
to amend Line #91, Inspector's Transportation, from 
1,400.00 to 1,700.00. The Finance Committee was 
against the motion to amend. The moderator took a 
Voice vote on the motion to amend, Motion defeated. 
Back to the Main Motion the Health Dept. budget. 



78. Board Members 

79. Director of Public Health 

80. Inspector 

81. Senior Clerk 

82. Physicians 

83. Vacation and Sickness 



828.00 

22,420.00 

12,600.00 

9,866.00 

1,000.00 

1.00 



Total 


46,715.00 


Expenses: 




84. Health and Professional Services 


4,000.00 


85. Mosquito Control Study 


1.00 


86. Transportation Directors 


1,700.00 


87. Other Expenses 


2,270.00 


88. Out of State Expense 


300.00 


89. Outlay 


1.00 


90. Blood Program 


150.00 


91 . Inspector's Transportation 


1,400.00 


Total 


9,822.00 


TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION DEPT. 


56,537.00 


Motion Carried, unanimously 




HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 




Salaries: 




92. Administration 


84,439.00 


93. Engineer's Fee 


10,000.00 


94. Labor - Men 


609,710.00 


Total 


704,149.00 


Expenses: 




95. Utilities - Materials - Misc. 


183,054.00 


96. Waste Collection 


73,290.00 


97. Stabilization Fund 


10,000.00 


98. Machine Hire - Other 


24,000.00 


99. Snow & Ice 


200,000.00 


100. Sidewalks 


7,000.00 


Total 


497,344.00 


TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 1 


,201,493.00 



After much discussion the Moderator attempted a Voice 
vote on this budget, which failed, a Hand vote was taken 
Yes 217 No 63 Motion Carried. 



The Moderator moved to adjourn until Thursday evening 
May 3, at the McCarthy Jr. High School. Motion carried, 
unanimously. Town Meeting adjourned at 10:55 PM. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 3, 1979 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:50 PM. by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin 
Jr., who recognized the presence of a quorum. There 
were 547 voters present. 



Fin. Com. 
Recmdtn. 

1,550.00 



1,550.00 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

101. Expenses 

TOTAL HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Motion carried, unanimously 

HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Expenses 400.00 

TOTAL HOME RULE ADVISORY COM . 400.00 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

103. Center 38,150.00 

104. North 17,976.00 

105. East 6,580.00 

106. South 4,200.00 

TOTAL HYDRANT SERVICE DEPT. 66,906.00 

Motion carried, unanimously 

INSECT PEST CONTROL 

107. Superintendent's Salary 

108. Expenses 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPT. 
Motion carried, unanimously 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

109. Prop. Liab. & All Types of Insurance 217,800.00 

110. Chapter 32B Insurance Employees 383,500.00 



1,250.00 
12,850.00 

14,100.00 



TOTAL INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

LAW DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

111. Town Counsel 

112. Legal Services 

113. Misc. Exp. Association Dues 

TOTAL LAW DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried Unanimously 



601,300.00 



500.00 

20,000.00 

2,500.00 

23,000.00 



33 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 



Chairman of the Board of Library Trustee's Dennis 
McHugh, moved to amend line items # 117, 119, 120, 
123, 124, 125. He wishes to increase the budget from the 
Finance Committee's recommended figure of 
$250,825.00 to 282,600.00. 

The Finance Committee is against the motion to 
amend. A lengthy discussion followed. The Moderator 
attempted to take ,a voice vote. Motion defeated. Mr. 
McHugh questioned the Voice Vote, the following tellers 
came forward and a Hand vote was taken: 



Connie Fabien 
Ray Dunn 
Edward Hilliard 
Russell Linstead 
Ruth Delaney 
Bob Sheridan 



Carl Olson 
Dorothy Lerer 
Margaret Johnson 
Norman LeBrecque 
Edward Marshall 
Dennis Ready 



The results of the hand count were 
Motion Carried. 



Yes 254 No 169. 



The Moderator attempted to take a Voice vote on the 
Main motion, This left the chair in doubt, the tellers 
came forward. The results of the hand vote were: Yes 
237 No 210, Motion carries, with the total figure of 
$282,600.00. minus the state funds Net Library 
$270,694.00. 



Assessment 47.70% 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

127. Superintendent's Salary 

128. Labor 

129. Expenses 

130. Outlays 

131. Recreation Field Maint. Labor 

132. Recreation Field Maint. Expense 

TOTAL PARK DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



PERSONNEL BOARD 
133. Expenses 

TOTAL PERSONNEL BOARD 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



PLANNING BOARD 



578,593.00 



16,991.00 
4,200.00 
3,000.00 
1.00 
4,725.00 
3,000.00 

31,917.00 



650.00 



650.00 



Salaries: 

114. Librarian 

115. Assistant Director 

116. Branch Librarian 

117. Assistant Librarians 

118. Library Aides 

119. Custodian & Security 

120. Vacation & Sickness 

Total 

Expenses: 

121 . Repair & Maint. of Buildings 

122. Fuel, Light and Water 

123. Books and Periodicals 

124. Other Expenses 

125. Outlays 

Total 
Total Library Department 
State Funds Received 

NET LIBRARY 



17,611.00 

12,600.00 

11,577.00 

115,998.00 

6,890.00 
24,441.00 

4,750.00 

193,867.00 



4,096.00 

14,000.00 

59,741.00 

9,473.00 

1,423.00 

88,733.00 

282,600.00 

11,906.00 

270,694.00 



See the May 21, 1979 Meeting. This budget was 
brought up for reconsideration. After Article 53 this 
budget -was revised. 



MODERATOR 



126. Moderator's Salary 



5,000.00 
2,100.00 
1,000.00 
1.00 
5,000.00 



13,101.00 



134. Planning Board Engineer 

135. Clerk Hire 

136. Expenses 

137. Outlay 

138. Consultant 

TOTAL PLANNING BOARD 
Motion carried, unanimously 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Mr. Ripsom moved to table the Police Department 
Budget, until Monday evening May 7, 1979, negotiations 
are still in progress. 

Motion carried to table this budget. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



300.00 



Salaries: 

149. Janitor's Salary 

150. Vacations and Sickness 

Total 
Expenses: 

151. Fuel, Light and Water 

152. Repairs, Equipment and Exp. 

153. Outlays 

Total 



9,021.00 
1.00 



9,022.00 



25,100.00 

9,500.00 

0.00 

34,600.00 



TOTAL MODERATOR 
Motion Carried, unanimously 



300.00 



TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPT. 
Motion Carried, unanimously 



43,622.00 



34 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

154. Salaries 

155. Expenses, Youth 

156. Outlay 

TOTAL RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Hand vote was taken on this Dept. Budget 
Yes 334 No 84, motion carried 

EAST SCHOOL 

157. Expenses 

158. Salaries, Custodians 

159. Recreational Supervisor 

TOTAL EAST SCHOOL 
Motion carried, unanimously 

REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

160. Registrars (3) 

161. Clerk 

162. Clerk for Board 

Total 
Expenses: 



41,760.00 

77,569.00 

4,905.00 

124,234.00 



9,417.00 
0.00 
0.00 



9,417.00 



1,080.00 

9,726.00 

884.00 



11,690.00 



163. Printing Men — Women 


Directory 


1,400.00 


164. Printing: Voter's Lists 




150.00 


165. Other Expenses 




675.00 


166. Data Processing 




3,600.00 


167. Census 




4,085.00 


Total 




9,910.00 


TOTAL REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 


21,600.00 



Motion Carried, unanimously 
SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

168. Clerk 0.00 

TOTAL SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 0.00 

Motion Carried, unanimously 0.00 

Mr. William Sharpley, Chairman of the School Com- 
mittee, moved to take article forty-two out of order. Mo- 
tion carried. 



Under Article 42 William Sharpley moved that the 
Town vote to accept Chapter 71, Section 71-E of the 
Massachusetts General Laws: An Act Providing for the 
Expenditure by School Committees of receipts from cer- 
tain programs. 

Mr. Sharpley explains that by accepting this article, 
the School Committee can make a reduction in their 
budget. This would enable the School Committee to use 
the money taken in from tuition from the Adult Educa- 
tion program and apply it to the cost of the Town runn- 
ing these programs. The Moderator asked Finance for 
their recommendation. The Finance was for the motion. 
The moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Chairman of the School Committee, William Sharpley, 
moved to have the Town Meetinb body approve the 
figure of $14,435,848.00 from this figure minus public 
law funds, and educational collaborative funds for a total 
budget figure of $14,267,205.00. Mr. Sharpley gave a 
brief description of the school budget. A discussion 
followed. George Nelson of the Finance Committee mov- 
ed to amend the budget to the following figures. 
$14,312,000.00 from this figure minus public law funds, 
and educational collaborative funds for a total budget 
figure of $14,143,357.00. More discussion followed. A 
question was asked on where the Finance Committee felt 
that the budget cuts should be made. It was explained 
that the Finance Committee could not touch any specific 
area, that they could just recommend a figure and if 
voted, then it would be up to the School Committee to 
make the adjustment within their own budget, them- 
selves. Mr. Sharpley speaks against the Finance Recom- 
mendation. Martin Ames moves the question. A hand 
count was taken on stopping debate: Yes 429 No 19, 
motion to stop debate passes. The Moderator then asked 
for a Voice vote on the Finance motion to amend the 
School Budget. Motion defeated. The Moderator then 
asked for a hand vote on the main motion, which is the 
School Committee's recommended total budget figure of 
$14,267,205.00. Yes 392 No 55. Motion carried. Mar- 
tin Ames moved for reconsideration of the School 
Budget. Motion defeated by Voice vote. The School 
budget is as follows: 



169. School Committee 

170. Superintendent's Office 

171. Supervision 

172. Principals 

173. Teaching 

175. Textbooks 

176. Library 

177. Audio- Visual 

178. Guidance 

179. Career Education 

180. School Attendance 

181 . Health Services 

182. Transportation 

183. Food Services 

184. Athletics 

185. Other Student Activities 

186. Custodial 

187. Utilities 

188. Maintenance — Grounds 

189. Maintenance — Buildings 

190. Maintenance — Equipment 

191. Adult Education 

192. Civic Activities 

193. Programs with Other Schools 

Sub Total 
Chapter 766 



31 

321 

281 

657 

8,437 

112 

272 

120 

413 

20 

21 

101 

701 

61 

147 

40 

661 

566 

40 

46 

83 

4 

3 

15 



,850.00 
,722.00 
,340.00 
,383.00 
,957.00 
,603.00 
,571.00 
,629.00 
,435.00 
,376.00 
,400.00 
,794.00 
,385.00 
.360.00 
,444.00 
,252.00 
,111.00 
,750.00 
,300.00 
,750.00 
,300.00 
,747.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 



13,164,459.00 



1,271,389.00 



Total 14,435,848.00 

Minus PL 874 98,956.00 

Minus Educational Collaborative Funds 69,687.00 



TOTAL TOWN FUNDS 



14,267,205.00 



35 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

206. Salary 

207. Expenses 



TOTAL 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



2,000.00 
300.00 



2,300.00 



TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

231. Expenses 

TOTAL TOWN CELEBRATION COM. 
Motion Carried, unanimously 



5,000.00 



5,000.00 



SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 

208. Chairman 1,500.00 

209. Board Members 4,000.00 

210. Selectmen Administrative Assistant 15,186.00 

211. Labor Relations Advisor 7,500.00 

212. Clerk (Part-time) 3,963.00 

213. Senior Clerk 19,131.00 

214. Purchasing Agent 1.00 

215. Town Planner 0.00 

216. Recreation Supervisor 0.00 

217. Clerk - Overtime 1,504.00 

Total 52,785.00 
Expenses: 

218. Expenses 7,648.00 

219. Conference Expenses 1,500.00 

220. Outlays 1,400.00 

221. Out of State 1.00 

222. Purchasing Agent 1,200.00 

223. Local Growth Policy Comm. 0.00 

224. Photo Copy Machine 7,740.00 

225. Transportation 400.00 

Total 19,889.00 

TOTAL SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 72,674.00 
Motion Carried, Unanimously 



TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

232. Town Clerk 

233. Assistant Town Clerk 

234. Senior Clerk (1) 

235. Clerk (Part-time) 

236. Clerk (Overtime) 

237. Vacation and Sickness 
237A. C.M.C. Compensation 

Total 
Expenses: 

238. Expenses 

239. Printing by- Laws Books 

240. Outlays 

Total 

TOTAL TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

241. Expenses 

Motion Carried Unanimously 



17,170.00 
11,491.00 
9,726.00 
4,052.00 
1,425.00 
800.00 
1,000.00 

45,664.00 



4,044.00 

1.00 

325.00 

4,370.00 
50,034.00 



0.00 



SEWER COMMISSION 

226. Professional Fee 

227. Expenses 

TOTAL SEWER COMM. DEPT. 
Motion Carried, unanimously 

STREET LIGHTING 

228. Street Lighting 

TOTAL STREET LIGHTING 
Motion carried, unanimously 

TOWN AIDE 

229. Salary 

230. Expenses 

TOTAL TOWN AIDE 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 



1.00 
300.00 



301.00 



85,000.00 



85,000.00 



11,030.00 
830.00 

11,860.00 



TREASURER & COLLECTOR DEPT. 

Salaries: 

242. Treasurer and Collector 

243. Assistant Treasurer 

244. Senior Clerk (4) 

245. Clerk's Part-time (2) 

246. Vacation & Sickness 

Total 
Expenses: 

247. Postage 

248. Printing, Advertising, Binding Stationery 

249. Bonds 

250. Expenses 

251. Outlays 

252. Data Processing Payroll 

Total 



20,953.00 
11,492.00 
38,904.00 
10,245.00 
1.00 

81,595.00 



TOTAL TREAS. & COLL. DEPT. 
Motion Carried, unanimously 



9,000.00 

2,000.00 

850.00 

3,800.00 

1.00 

16,000.00 

31,651.00 
113,246.00 



36 



TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Salaries: 

253. Tree Warden 

254. Fees 

Total 

Expenses: 

255. Other Expenses 

256. Outlay 

Total 



TOTAL TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT^ 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 



WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 



UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 

257. Town & Finance Committee Reports 

258. CATV Committee 

259. Expenses for Memorial Day 

260. Expenses for Town Clock 

261 . Ambulance Service 

262. Lowell Mental Health Assoc. 

263. Veteran Pension Claims 

264. D.P.W. Committee 

265. Historic District Committee 

266. Bus Transportation Subsidy 

267. Share Inc. (Drug Rehab.) 

268. NMAC Assessment 

269. Unemployment Benefits Due State 

270. A Cultural Council 

270. Preliminary Project Study 



1,000.00 
1.00 



1,001.00 



16,500.00 
1.00 

16,501.00 



17,502.00 



8,000.00 

50.00 

1,500.00 

525.00 

1.00 

8,695.00 

5,520.00 

1.00 

705.00 

35,500.00 

23,737.00 

8,592.00 

75,000.00 

300.00 

0.00 



279. Inspector's Salary 


16,355.00 


280. Vacation and Sickness 


1.00 


281. Senior Clerk y$ 


1.00 


282. Expenses 


1,040.00 


283. Transportation 


1,800.00 


284. Out of Town Expenses 


275.00 


TOTAL WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPT. 


19,472.00 



Motion Carried, Unanimously 
YOUTH CENTER 

285. Salaries 

286. Expenses 

287. Outlay 

TOTAL YOUTH CENTER 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

Mr. Arthur Colmer moved to adjourn. Motion Car- 
ried. The Town Meeting will adjourn until Monday even- 
ing at 7:30 PM at the McCarthy Junior High. This session 
adjourned at 10:35 PM. 



30,304.00 

5,315.00 

0.00 

35,619.00 



Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED DEPTS. 

Motion carried, unanimously 



168,126.00 



VARNEY PLAYGROUND 



271. Labor 

272. Expenses 

273. Outlays 



3,500.00 

3,000.00 

600.00 



TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 



7,100.00 



VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 

274. Salary of Veteran's Agent 14,207 .00 

275. Clerical 9,726.00 

276. Expenses 3,000.00 

277. Outlay 1.00 

278. Cash and Material Grants 75,000.00 



TOTAL VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPT. 
Motion carried, unanimously 



101,934.00 



37 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 7, 1979 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:55 PM, by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin 
Jr., who recognized the presence of a quorum. There 
were 261 voters present. 

Under Article 4 Treasurer, Philip J. McCormack, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of 
the Financial year beginning July 1, 1979, in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 
4 and to issue a note or notes as may be given for a period 
of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 44 Section 17. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 5 Treasurer, Philip J. McCormack, 
moved that the Town vote to request the Department of 
Corporations and Taxation, Division of Accounts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of all 
accounts in all departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 6 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved to 
withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 7 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$438,443.00 to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension expense and military service funds. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 8 George Ripsom of the Finance Com- 
mittee, moved that the Town vote to raise and ap- 
propriate $130,000.00 and transfer from available funds 
$70,000.00 to be used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion 
of the Finance Committee, as provided in General Laws, 
Chapter 40, Section 6. Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 9 Martin Ames moved to table this arti- 
cle until Monday Evening May 14, 1979. Motion Carried. 

Mr. George Ripsom moved for reconsideration of Arti- 
cle 8. From a legal point of view article 8 did not mention 
what available funds were going to be used to transfer the 
$70,000.00 from. The motion should have read from the 
Overlay Surplus Reserve Funds. The Moderator asked for 
a Voice vote for Reconsideration. 
Motion Carried. 



Under Article 8 George Ripsom moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate $130,000.00 and transfer 
from the Overlay Surplus Reserve Funds $70,000.00 to be 
used as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance 
Committee, as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 6. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 10 George Simonian moved to with 
draw this article. 

Motion Carried. 

Under Article 11 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $72,000. for the 
purpose of purchasing nine (9) new 1 980 four door sedans 
to be used by the Police Department, said purchase to be 
made under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, 
and to authorize the Selectmen to transfer by good and 
sufficient bill of sale, title to one (1) 1976, one (1) 1977 
and two (2) 1979 cruisers now being used by the Police 
Department and transfer one (1) 1979 vehicle to the Dog 
Officer and transfer one (1) 1979 to the Auxilliary Police 
and to authorize the Selectmen to transfer by good and 
sufficient bill of sale' title to one (1) 1974 vehicle current 
ly being used by the Dog Officer and to authorize the 
Selectmen to transfer by good and sufficient bill of sale, 
title to one (1) 1976 vehicle currently being used by the 
Auxilliary Police. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 12 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 to 
match LEAA Federal Funds for the purpose to provide 
mutual aid programs for the police department. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 13 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 to be 
placed in a special fund as authorized under the provi- 
sions of Chapter 44, Section 53C of the General Laws. 
Said Funds to be used, along with all other monies receiv- 
ed by the Town as Compensation earned by its employees 
from off-duty work details, in such manner and at such 
times as shall, in the discretion of the authority authoriz 
ing such off-duty work detail, compensate the employee 
for such services. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 14 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $8,000.00 for the 
purchase of a 1979 or 1980 four-door sedan type vehicle 
for the Fire Department, said purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen; and to 
authorize said Board to transfer by good and sufficient 
bill of sale (1) 1973 Chevrolet four-door sedan type vehi- 
cle now being used by the Fire Department. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



38 



Under Article 15 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $105,676.00 for 
the purchase of equipment for the Highway Department, 
such purchase to be made under the supervision of the 
Board of Selectmen, and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to dispose of equipment presently being used by the 
Highway Department as follows: 

(a) To purchase two (2) truck chassis (for waste collec- 
tion) for the Highway Department and to sell by 
good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) waste collec- 
tion truck presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 

(b) To purchase two (2) packer bodies (for waste collec- 
tion) for the Highway Department. 

(f) To purchase one (1) Sweeper Broom for the 
Highway Department and to sell by good and suffi 
cient bill of sale three (3) Sweeper Brooms. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 16 Arthur L. Bennett moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 
for the purchase of a 1979 or 1980 Lawn and Garden 
Tractor, and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one 
(1) John Deere 140 Tractor with rotary mower and 
vacuum attachment. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 17 Gerald Hardy moved that the Town 
vote to transfer $5,000.00 from the sale of graves and lots 
to the Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 18 Gerald Hardy moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,600.00 for 
roof repairs at the maintenance building of the Cemetery 
Department. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 19 Gerald Hardy moved that the Town 
vote to transfer from the Perpetual Care Interest Account 
$5,000.00 into the Beautification Account. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 20 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $50,000.00 for 
the purpose of resurfacing portions of certain streets 
throughout the Town with Type I bituminous concrete. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 21 Paul C. Hart moved to withdraw this 
article. 



Under Article 22 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $50,000.00 for 
the construction of sidewalks. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 23 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $150,000.00 to 
alleviate certain drainage problems throughout the 
Town, under the supervision of the Board of Selectmen. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 24 Paul C. Hart moved to withdraw this 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 25 William K. Sharpley moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $23,000.- 
00 for the purpose of providing engineering, legal and 
contractual services to furnish and install a drainage 
system starting at the rear of South Row School terminat- 
ing in River Meadow Brook. Such system to be essentially 
as outlined by a "sketch" plan developed by Emmons, 
Fleming & Bienvenu dated January 1979, and designed to 
eliminate persistent flooding problems at the rear of the 
South Row School. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 26 Herbert Wexler moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate $56,200.00 for addi- 
tional installation of enough storm drains to alleviate 
water problems in the vicinity of Gail Street, Warren 
Avenue and Pearson Street. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 27 Paul Murphy moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $25,400.00 for 
the engineering, grading and construction of two Soccer 
Fields at the Harrington School Site. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Mrs. Bette Ressel of the Soccer Association gave a presen- 
tation concerning the request. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 28 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,800.00 to be 
used to join or buy into the Elder Services of the Merri- 
mack Valley Inc., for the purpose of obtaining services 
for the care of the Town's Older American. 

Finance Committee recommends the article. 



Motion Carried, unanimously 



Motion Carried, unanimously 



39 



Under Article 29 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,520.00 to 
purchase a certain parcel of land from the Trustees of the 
Perm Central Transportation Co., situated in the Town 
of Chelmsford, County of Middlesex, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, bounded Southeasterly by land of Penn 
Central Transportation Co., and Northwesterly by land 
of the Town of Chelmsford, being part of right-of-way 
known as the Lowell Secondary Branch I.D. No. 
MAB100-CO2 and shown on VAL Map No. 
500-9 104D23 1 containing 8,000 square feet more or 
less. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. A 
discussion followed. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 30 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $6,750. to pur- 
chase a certain parcel of land with improvements from 
the Trustees of the Penn Central Transportation Co., 
situated in the Town of Chelmsford, County of Middesex, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, bounded easterly by 
land now or formerly of State Lumber Company and 
northwesterly by land now or formerly of Grantor, being 
part of a right-of-way known as the Lowell Secondary 
Branch I.D. No. MAB100 C02 and shown on VAL 
15,000 square feet more or less. 

The Finance Committee does not recommend this arti- 
cle. A lengthy discussion followed. The Moderator at- 
tempted to take a Voice vote, which left the chair in 
doubt the following tellers came forward: 



Dorothy Lerer 
Dennis Ready 
Robert Sheridan 
Richard Burtt 



Connie Fabien 



EdHilliard 

Ruth Delaney 

George Baxendale 

Margaret Johnson 



The hand count results: Yes 187 No 16 Motion passed. 

Under Article 31 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,332.00 to 
purchase a certain parcel of land from the Trustees of the 
Penn Central Transportation Co., situated in the Town 
of Chelmsford, County of Middlesex, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, bounded Northwesterly and Northeaster- 
ly by Grantor, Southeasterly by Central Square, being 
part of a right-of-way known as the Lowell Secondary 
Branch, I.D. No. MAB100-Co2 and shown on VAL Map 
No. 500-1904-141D-23-1 containing 4,000 square feet 
more or less. 

The Finance Committee is against this article. A 
discussion followed. A Hand vote was taken Yes 66 No 
130, Motion was defeated. 

Under Article 32 Louis Kelley moved that the Town 
vote to accept the proposal of the Regional District 
School Committee passed on March 20, 1979, to amend 
the agreement establishing the Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School District as amended (a) by providing for the 
admission to the district of such of the Towns of Ayer, 



Pepperell, Shirley and Townsend and vote to accept the 
agreement as amended; (b) by providing that members of 
the Committee shall be appointed by an appointing com- 
mittee in each town consisting of the moderator, select- 
men and local school committee members; (c) by pro- 
viding that membership on the committee shall be as 
follows: Chelmsford - 3 members, Groton - 1 member, 
Littleton 1 member, Westford - 2 members, Ayer 2 
members (if Ayer joins the District), Pepperell - 1 
member (if Pepperell joins the District), Shirley - 1 
member (if Shirley joins) and Townsend - 1 member (if 
Townsend joins); (d) by providing that each member 
town shall have an alternate member to the Committee 
who can serve in the absence or disability of a member 
from the Town involved; (e) by providing that the capital 
costs related to the addition to the district school 
authorized by vote of the Committee passed March 20, 
1979 shall be apportioned among such of the Towns of 
Ayer, Pepperell, Shirley and Townsend and vote to ac- 
cept the agreement as amended on the basis of their 
respective pupil enrollments in the district school (prior 
capital costs continuing to be apportioned among the 
present member towns essentially as presently provided in 
the agreement); (f) by providing that the capital costs of 
any subsequent capital improvements of the district shall 
be apportioned among all the member towns on the basis 
of their respective pupil enrollment in the district school; 
(g) by providing that in each case where the apportion- 
ment of capital costs is to be based on pupil enrollment in 
the district school, each member town shall be deemed to 
have an enrollment of at least five (5) pupils; (h) by con- 
forming the dates on which payments to the district by 
the member towns are due to a July 1 -June 30 fiscal year, 
and (i) by making technical changes incidental to the 
foregoing amendments. (Such amendment will not 
become effective until the amendment is accepted by the 
Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton and Westford 
and at least two of the Towns of Ayer, Pepperell, Shirley 
and Townsend.) Copies of the agreement as amended 
and as proposed to be amended, as described in this Arti- 
cle, are available at the office of the Town Clerk. 

Donald Ayer gave a presentation and answered ques- 
tions concerning the article. The Finance Committee and 
Selectmen recommend this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Jack Bouknight, questioned the quorum. The counters 
came forward, the count, there were 214 voters still pre- 
sent. The By-law states 200 voters must be present, the 
Town Meeting continued. 

Under Article 33 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
under and pursuant to authority granted in General Laws 
Chapter 40D, Section 21 (g) as amended, authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to enter into a contract with the 
operator of solid waste disposal facilities to be established 
in the Town of North Andover for the disposal of refuse, 
garbage and waste and for the use of by-products 
resulting from the operation of such facilities, which con- 
tract will: 

(1) be for a term of twenty years, more or less 



40 



(2) include provisions for the delivery of minimum 
amounts of refuse, garbage and waste and pay 
ments for the use of the facilities to be based 
thereon; 

(3) provide for unit prices that will be graduated and 
for adjustments thereof and for the use of steam, 
electricity and other by-products resulting from the 
use of the facilities and for credits or payments of 
the Town resulting therefrom; 

(4) the use of the Town or other municipalities of the 
uncommitted capacity of such facilities; 

(5) contain other provisions incidental and related to 
the foregoing general matters; and 

(6) be generally in the form of proposed contract 
negotiated by representatives of the member com- 
munities of the Northeast Solid Waste Committee 
(NESWC) with such changes therein as may be ap- 
proved by said Board of Selectmen. 

Selectman Carson gave a presentation of the above ar- 
ticle. A lengthy discussion followed. 

Dennis Ready moved the question. A Voice vote was 
taken on the motion to move the question, which left the 
chair in doubt. A Hand vote was taken Yes 153 No 3, Mo- 
tion Carried to stop debate. A Voice vote was taken on 
the main motion. Motion Carried. 

Under Article 34 John McCormack moved to with- 
draw this article. 

Motion Carried 

George Ripsom moved to remove the Police Depart- 
ment Budget from the table, Mr. Taylor questioned the 
quorum. The tellers came forward, the count resulted as 
having 177 voters present. Town By-laws states 200 must 
be present. Mr. Hart makes a motion that the Police 
Department be the opening order of business, at the next 
Adjourned Meeting. Selectman Hart moved for the Town 
Meeting to adjourn until Thursday Evening May 10, 1979 
at the McCarthy Jr. High at 7:30 PM. Motion carried. 
This meeting adjourned at 10:40 PM. 



Daniel J. Coughlinjr. 
Town Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 10, 1979 

Daniel J. Coughlinjr. Town Moderator, acknowledged 
that due to a lack of a quorum, there were 109 voters pre- 
sent, that this session of the Adjourned Annual Town 
Meeting would have to be adjourned. Selectman Paul C. 
Hart moved to adjourn this session until Monday Evening 
at 7:30 PM on May 14, 1979. Motion Carried, the 
meeting adjourned at 7:45 PM. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
May 14, 1979 



The Special Town Meeting was called 
PM by the Town Moderator Daniel J. 
recognized the presence of a quorum, 
voters present. Selectman Paul C. Hart 
the reading of the Constable's return of 
posting of the warrant. Motion carried, 
then moved that the reading of the en 
waived. Motion carried. Selectman Hart 
the Special Town Meeting till 8:30 PM. 



to order at 7:40 
Coughlin, who 
there were 410 
moved to waive 
service and the 
Selectman Hart 
tire warrant be 
moved to recess 
Motion carried. 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order. The Moderator recognized the presence of a 
quorum. Mr. George Ripsom of the Finance Committee 
moved to take the Police Budget from the table. It was so 
voted. 

The Finance Committee recommended the Police 
Budget with a total budget of $1,286,209.00 minus 
Federal Revenue Sharing of $469,633.00 with a total cost 
to the Town of $816,576.00. A lengthy discussion follow- 
ed. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which left the 
chair in doubt, the following tellers came forward: 



Eugene Doody 
Joe Maher 
Ruth Delaney 
Dennis Ready 
Margaret Johnson 
Bob Monaco 



Paul Bienvenu 

Myra Silver 

Dorothy Lerer 

Bob Sheridan 
Ron Wikander 

Vicki Cooper 



Daniel J. Coughlinjr. 
Town Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



Results of the hand count: Yes 168 No 149 
Because of the tax cap a 2/3 vote is required on any 
budget item which is over a 4% increase. 

Selectman Hart moved for reconsideration of the 
Police Budget, in order to bring it back up on the floor 
for more discussion. The moderator asked for a voice 
vote, Motion carried for reconsideration. 

More lengthy discussion followed with the Moderator 
moving to recess due to the fact that the time had reached 
8:30 which was the time voted to commence with the 
Special Town Meeting. 

The Moderator recognized the presence of a quorum. 

Under Article 1 Selectman Paul Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey 
all the right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town 
in a certain parcel of land with buildings hereon, for con- 
sideration to be determined, located on School Street, be- 
ing the same premises described in two deeds to the In- 
habitants of the Town of Chelmsford and recorded in the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 69, 
Page 46 and Book 1463, Page 324 containing, according 
to said deeds, 1 acre and 1.38 acres respectively, all as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Chelmsford, 
Ma., prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, Scale 1 inch 
= 40 feet, July 1976, Emmons, Fleming and Bienvenu 
Inc., Engineers and Surveyors" Recorded in said Registry 



41 



of Deeds at Plan Book 123, Plan 7, or to convey any por- 
tion thereof. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 2 William K. Sharpley moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from Unclassified Departments 
Unemployment Benefits due state the sum of $50,000.00 
to the New High School Construction Account. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. A 
discussion followed. 

Motion Carried. 

Under Article 3 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to transfer from unclassified Departments Am- 
bulance Service Account the sum of $7,000.00 for the 
engineering design and study and the installation of traf- 
fic control devices at the intersection of Billerica Road 
and Chelmsford Streets. 

Selectman Emerson spoke on the article. The Finance 
Committee recommends the article. Mr. Edward Hilliard 
moved to amend this article, by deleting the words "and 
the installation of traffic control devices". Discussion 
followed on Mr. Hilliards motion. A voice vote was taken 
on Mr. Hilliard's motion, which was defeated. Mr. Den- 
nis Ready moved to amend the main motion, by adding 
at the end of the last sentence of the main motion, once a 
traffic rotary is tried and fails to solve the traffic problem 
in Chelmsford Center. A discussion followed. Selectman 
Emerson moved the question. A Voice vote was taken on 
stopping debate. Motion Carried. Mr. Ready's motion 
now becomes the main motion and now reads: Mr. Den- 
nis Ready moved that the Town vote to transfer from 
Unclassified Departments Ambulance Service Account 
the sum of $7,000.00 for the engineering design and 
study and the installation of traffic control devices at the 
intersection of Billerica Road and Chelmsford Streets, 
once a traffic rotary is tried and fails to solve the traffic 
problem in Chelmsford center. More discussion followed. 
Selectman Emerson moved the question. A Voice vote 
was taken on stopping debate. Motion Carried, 
unanimously. A Voice vote was taken on the main motion 
as amended. Motion Carried. 

Under Article 4 Gerald Hardy, Cemetery Commis- 
sioner moved that the Town vote to transfer from the 
Finance Committee Reserve Fund the sum of $33,000.00 
for the purchase of equipment for the Cemetery Depart- 
ment, such purchase to be made under the supervision of 
the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to dispose of certain equipment presently be- 
ing used by the Cemetery Department as follows: 

1. To purchase one (1) Tractor- Loader- Backhoe 

2. To sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) In- 
ternational Model 2444 Loader presently being us- 
ed by the Cemetery Department 

3. To purchase one (1) 3/4 ton Pick-up Truck with 
plow. 



The Finance committee recommended this article. A 
Voice vote was taken. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



Under Article 5 Selectman Hart moved that the Town 
vote to transfer from Finance Committee Reserve Fund 
$10,000.00 for the purpose of aerial spraying or other ac- 
tion for the control of mosquitoes under the supervision 
of the Board of Health. 

Michael Stott spoke in favor of the article. Mrs. Tambo 
of the League of Women voters asked four questions con- 
cerning the effects of aerial spraying. Ina Greenblatt also 
answered Mrs. Tambo's questions, Edward Hilliard mov- 
ed the question. A voice vote was taken on stopping 
debate. Motion Carried, unanimously. A voice vote was 
taken on the motion, which left the chair in doubt. A 
hand vote was taken: Yes 232 No 132 Motion Carried. 

Under Article 6 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to direct the Board of Selectmen to take 
such action as may be necessary for the Town to withdraw 
from the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Pro- 
gram. 

The Selectmen did not submit this article themselves, it 
came to them by petition. Mr. Reade who was one of the 
names on the petition spoke on why he felt the Town 
should withdraw from this program. David Scott from 
the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Program spoke of 
how the program could benefit the Town. Peter 
Dulchinos of the Board of Health felt that the Town 
should stay in because this program is starting to take 
tests on the larva stage of the mosquito's in Town and the 
results could help the next year's project. The Moderator 
took a Voice vote on the article which was defeated. 

Selectman Paul C. Hart moved to adjourn Sine die. 
Motion Carried at 10:15. 

The Moderator returned to the Police Department 
Budget which had been recessed during discussion in 
order to proceed into the Special Town Meeting. 

Selectman Hart introduced Deputy Chief Edwards who 
gave an oral presentation on each line item of the Police 
Budget. He explained why the Budget needed additional 
Deputy Chiefs. The reason is because at the present 
sergeants are in charge of the last two shifts of the day. 
This is a burden that they carry without any additional 
pay. If another Sergeant is on duty, but out in a patrol 
car, he and the Sergeant in charge of the shift receive the 
same pay. Deputy Chief Edwards explained that if a 
Deputy Chief is put in charge of these shifts, that this 
position is strictly Salary no Overtime is paid. One Depu- 
ty Chief will be in charge of Administration along with 
his shift, and the other will be in charge of Operations, 
along with his regular shift. There would be thirty-nine 
patrolmen. Presently there are three Senior Clerks, Depu- 
ty Chief Edwards explained that two Junior Clerks are be- 
ing added to enable the patrolmen more time out on the 
road. Instead of typing and writing reports for the ar- 
rests, motor vehicle violations, themselves, these clerks 



42 



will handle the clerical work. Deputy Chief Edwards ex- 
plained the additional Expenses and why a request is be- 
ing made. Deputy Chief Edwards then entertained ques- 
tions from the floor. 



The Moderator asked for a Voice vote on the Police 
Department Budget with a total figure of $1,286,209.00 
minus revenue sharing for a total Town cost of 
$816,576.00, this left the chair in doubt, the tellers came 
forward. The result of the hand count was: Yes 221 No 23 
the Motion carried. The Police Department is as follows: 

Fin. Committee Recom. 



Salaries: 

139. Officers and Administration 

140. Regular and Special Account 

141 . School Traffic Supervisors 

Total 

142. Maintenance and Equipment 

143. Chiefs Out of State Expense 

144. Outlays 

145. Special & Education Out of State 

146. Regional Tactical Unit, Exp. 

146A Entrant & Promotional Consultants 

Total 

Total Police Department 

147. Appropriation From Federal 
Revenue Sharing Sal. 

TOTAL COST FOR THE TOWN 



$291,325.00 

845,285.00 

0.00 

1,136,610.00 

110,590.00 

1,050.00 

27,658.00 

7,300.00 

1.00 

3,000.00 

149,599.00 

1,286,209.00 

469,633.00 
816,576.00 



George Ripsom of the Finance Committee moved to 
take Article 9 from the table, Motion Carried, 
unanimously. 

Under Article 9 Philip J. McCormack moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the transfer of $100,000.00 from 
free cash to pay a bond issue note or notes borrowed for 
the purpose of erecting bleachers and appurtenant struc- 
tures at the site of the new Chelmsford High School. 

Mr. Ripson explained the purpose of this article. 

The Finance Committee recommended the Article. 

A voice vote was taken, Motion Carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 35 John McCormack of the Conserva- 
tion Commission moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by fee simple or emi- 
nent domain, in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 132A and Chapter 40, a certain parcel of 
land located off Acton Road owned now or formerly own- 
ed by Thomas Liakos and described as follows: 

Being a portion of the premises shown as Parcel #2 on a 
deed dated October 31, 1978, to Thomas J. Liakos from 
Herbert B. Mosher, District Director of Internal Revenue 
recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 2335 at Page 488. 

The land in said Chelmsford situated on the easterly 
side of Robbins Hill, so called, containing eight (8) acres 



and thirty-seven (37) rods, more or less, and bounded as 
follows: 



Beginning at the most northerly corner by the Bridle 
Road and by land formerly of Capt. Josiah Fletcher; 
thence running westerly by said Fletcher's land to land 
formerly of Samuel Parkhurst; thence running southerly 
by said Parkhurst's land to land formerly of William 
Byam; thence still southerly by said Byam's land to land 
formerly of Betsy Foster; thence running easterly by said 
Foster's land to land formerly of Elias Sweetser; thence 
northeasterly by said Sweetser's land to said Bridle Road; 
thence northerly by said Bridle Road to the point of 
beginning. Being the same premises conveyed to the 
grantors by deed dated January 21, 1975, recorded with 
said Deeds in Book 2139, Page 33. 

Subject to and with the benefit of easements and 
restrictions insofar as the same are still in force and ap- 
plicable. 

This land contains approximately 8.23 acres and is to 
be held, managed and controlled by the Conservation 
Commission for the promotion and development of the 
natural resources and for the protection of the watershed 
resources of the Town, and further, for the purpose of ac- 
quiring said land, that the Conservation Commission be 
authorized to enter into a contractual self-help agree- 
ment with the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, 
and that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$4,000. and transfer the sum of $4,500, from the Conser- 
vation Trust Fund. 

George Ripson of the Finance Committee spoke on the 
article and said that the Committee supported the article. 
Mr. McCormack spoke on the article and explained why 
he felt the Town should obtain this piece of land. 

Selectman Hart moved to adjourn this meeting until 
Thursday night May 17th at the McCarthy Junior High 
School at 7:30 PM. Motion Carried. 



Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



43 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 21, 1979 



The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:50 PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 
329 voters present. 

The Moderator moved to have the Town Clerk record 
in the minutes of this meeting, the acknowledgement of 
the passing away of Philip J. McCormack, Town Trea- 
surer/Tax Collector on May 19, 1979. The Moderator 
wanted the record to show that this Town Meeting Body 
recognized that Philip J. McCormack was a good public 
servant, good friend and good guide. The Moderator 
then asked for a moment of silence in memory of Philip J. 
McCormack. 

In order to comply with Chapter 151 Acts of 1979, 
Town Counsel presented the following motions, which re- 
quired either a 2/3's vote or a unanimous vote: 

Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved that the Town vote to 
increase the appropriations and budget limit established 
under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 so that the towns 
appropriations and budget limit for fiscal year 1980 shall 
be $24,468,731.00 (see new figures after art. 63) 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

William C. Sharpley moved that the Town vote to in- 
crease the budget limit established under Chapter 151 
Acts of 1979 for the School Department so that the School 
Department Budget for fiscal year 1980 shall be 
$14,435,848.00 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that the Town vote to 
increase the levy limit established under Chapter 151 of 
the Acts of 1979 for fiscal year 1980. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 36 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to join the Lowell Regional Transit Authority in con- 
formity with and pursuant to all of the applicable provi- 
sions of Chapter 161B. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. The 
Selectmen were also in favor of this article. Mr. O'Sulli- 
van of the Lowell Regional Transit Authority explained 
the article. Roger Welch of the Marinel Transportation 
Co. here in Chelmsford, spoke in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 37 Paul C. Hart moved that the Town 
vote to participate in the Lowell Regional Transit 
Authority's Handicap and Elderly Rides program. 



The Selectmen and the Finance Committee both 
recommend this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 38 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved that 
the Town vote to accept Chapter 90, Section 20C; of the 
Massachusetts General Laws: Violations of Parking 
Regulations, etc., in Certain Cities and Towns; Notice; 
Appearance; Schedule of Fines; Proceedings not 
Criminal. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried. 

Under Article 39 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article I 
General Provisions by adding the following section pur- 
suant to Chapter 40 Section 21D of the Massachusetts 
General Laws: 

Section 2 — Noncriminal Disposition of Violations of 
any Ordinance, By-Law or Regulation of any Municipal 
Officer, Board or Department. 

Any person taking cognizance of a violation of a 
specific ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation which he is 
empowered to enforce, hereinafter referred to as the en- 
forcing person, as an alternative to initiating criminal 
proceedings, may pursuant to Chapter 40 Section 21 D of 
Massachusetts General Laws, give the offender a written 
notice to appear before the clerk of the District Court of 
Lowell, or any other Court having jurisdiction thereof, at 
any time during the office hours, not later than (21) 
twenty-one days after the date of such notice. Such notice 
shall be in triplicate and shall contain the name and ad- 
dress, if known, of the offender, the specific offense 
charged, and the time and place for his required ap- 
pearance. Such notice shall be signed by the enforcing 
person, and shall be signed by the offender whenever 
practicable in acknowledgement that such notice has 
been received. The enforcing person shall, if possible, 
deliver to the offender a copy of said notice at the time 
and place of the violation. If it is not possible to deliver a 
copy of said notice to the offender at the time and place 
of the violation, said copy shall be mailed or delivered by 
the enforcing person, or by his commanding officer or the 
head of his department or by any person authorized by 
such commanding officer, department or head to the of- 
fender's last known address, within fifteen days after said 
violation. Such notice as so mailed shall be deemed a suf- 
ficient notice, and a certificate of the person so mailing 
such notice that it has been mailed in accordance with 
this section shall be prima facie evidence thereof. 

At or before the completion of each tour of duty, or at 
the beginning of the first subsequent tour of duty, the en- 
forcing person shall give to his commanding officer or 
department head those copies of each notice of such 
violation he has taken cognizance of during such tour 
which have not already been delivered or mailed by him 
as aforesaid. Said commanding officer or department 
head shall retain and safely preserve on copy and shall, at 
a time not later than the next court day after such 



44 



delivery or mailing, deliver the other copy to the clerk of 
the court before which the offender has been notified to 
appear. The Clerk of the District Court shall maintain a 
separate docket of all such notices to appear. 

Any person notified to appear before the clerk of a 
district court hereinbefore provided may so appear and 
confess the offense charged, either personally or through 
a duly authorized agent or by mailing to such clerk with 
the notice such specific sum of money not exceeding two 
hundred dollars as the town shall fix as penalty for viola- 
tion of the ordinance, by-law, rule or regulation. Such 
payment shall, if mailed, be made only by postal note, 
money or check. The payment to the clerk of such sum 
shall operate as a final disposition of the case. An ap- 
pearance under this paragraph shall not be deemed to be 
a criminal proceeding. No person so notified to appear 
before the clerk of a district court shall be required to 
report to any probation officer, and no record of the case 
shall be entered in any probation records. If any person 
so notified to appear desires to contest the violation alleg- 
ed in the notice to appear, he may avail himself of the 
procedure established in Chapter 40 Section 21D. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 40 Paul C. Hart, moved that the Town 
vote to accept Chapter 41 Section 100B of the Massachu- 
setts General Laws: Indemnification of Retired Police Of- 
ficers and Firefighters for certain hospital, etc. expenses. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 41 Chief Reid of the Fire Department, 
moved that the Town vote to accept Chapter 148 Section 
26C of the Massachusetts General Laws: Smoke and Heat 
Detectors for Dwellings Not Otherwise Regulated. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 
Chief Reid explained the purpose of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 43 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article II 
Town Meeting Section 3 Town Meeting Rules of Order 
Subsection 2 — Quorum Requirements by deleting sub- 
paragraph 2.1 and subparagraph 2.2 and substituting 
the following: 

There shall be no quorum requirement to legally tran- 
sact and consummate the business of the Town at any 
Annual Town Meeting, or any Special Town Meeting. 

The Finance Committee moved to amend this article 
by deleting the words or any Special Town Meeting. 
George Ripsom spoke on why the Finance Committee felt 
that a quorum was still required for a Special Town 
Meeting. 



Selectman Emerson spoke against this amendment. 
Selectman Emerson then amended the amendment, 
Selectman Emerson's motion reads: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the motion to 
provide the General By-laws Article II Town Meeting 
Section 3 town Meeting Rules or Order Quorum Re- 
quirements by deleting subparagraph 2.1 and 
substituting the following: 

2.1 A quorum of not less than 100 registered voters 
eligible to vote must be present at any or all Annual 
Town Meetings to legally transact and consummate the 
business of the Town. 

This motion was defeated by a Voice Vote. 

A voice vote was taken on George Ripsom's Motion: 
"There shall be no quorum requirement to legally tran- 
sact and consummate the business of the Town at any 
Annual Town Meeting." 

The Voice Vote defeated the motion. Robert Charpen- 
tier questioned the voice vote. The following tellers came 
forward in order to take a hand vote: 



George Baxendale 
Dorothy Lerer 
Myra Silver 
Ed Hilliard 
Richard Burtt 
Paul Bienvenu 

Yes 174 No 112 Motion carried 



Jean Rook 

Bill Sharpley 

Bob Sheridan 

Ed Marshall 

Dennis Ready 

Connie Fabien 



The main motion as amended now reads: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By- 
Laws Article II Town Meeting Section 3 Town Meeting 
Rules of Order subsection 2 — Quorum Requirements by 
deleting subparagraph 2.1 and substituting the follow- 
ing: 

There shall be no quorum requirement to legally tran- 
sact and consummate the business of the Town at any 
Annual Town Meeting. 

A voice vote was taken which left the Chair in doubt. A 
hand vote was taken Yes 187 No 96, Motion Carried. 

Under Article 44 Mr. Jean Paul Gravell of the Home 
Rule Advisory Committee presented this article. The 
Finance Committee was against this article. Mr. Safdie 
presented a motion to amend: by deleting paragraph 1.4 
entitled "officer being recalled may be a candidate". A 
discussion followed. A Voice vote was taken on this mo- 
tion to amend, motion defeated. Mr. Safdie then pre- 
sented another motion to amend: paragraph 1.7, entitled 
"limitations on petitions" be amended by reducing the 
time limitation from six months to three months. A voice 
vote was taken on this motion to amend, motion 
defeated. Mr. Julian Zabierek moved that this article be 
dismissed. A voice vote was taken on this motion, motion 
carried. 



45 



Under Article 45 

dismiss this article. 



Mr. Julian Zabierek moved to 



A Voice vote was taken on Mr. Zabierek's motion. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

Under Article 46 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article VI 
Police Regulations by adding Section 19 entitled 
"Regulation of Motor Boats and Recreational Vehicles 
on Baptist Pond" as follows: 

It shall be unlawful for any person to operate a marine 
or recreational vehicle powered by an engine including 
snowmobiles, on any portion of Baptist Pond at any time. 

The Finance Committee moved to amend this article 
by excluding motor boats from this by-law. 

Mr. Ripsom explained that it was brought to the atten- 
tion of the Finance Committee that a lot of the residents 
own motor boats and that the snowmobiles were causing 
problems among the residents around the Pond. 

A voice vote was taken on Mr. Ripsom's motion, which 
was defeated. 

A voice vote was taken on the main motion, which was 
defeated. 

Under Article 47 Selectman Paul C. Hart, moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws, Article 

VII Miscellaneous, Section 5 — Roadside Stands by delet- 
ing the word "and" between the words rugs and trees and 
substituting the word "or" and further amending said 
Section 5 by adding the following: 

"Any person having a usual place of business within the 
Town may conduct the aforesaid activities on the same 
premises in connection with and accessory to his primary 
business, without obtaining said license." 

Selectman Shanahan explained the purpose of this ar- 
ticle. 

Motion Carried, by Voice Vote 

Under Article 48 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws, Article 

VIII — Waste Disposal Section 3 — Trash Disposal, (Re- 
cycling) deleting the word "required" between the words 
"are" and "to" in the first sentence and substituting the 
word "requested" and further amending section 3 by 
deleting the last sentence in its entirety. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 49 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000.00 to purchase the necessary equipment to imple- 
ment a voluntary recycling program. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 



Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 50 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article VII 
Section 7 Miscellaneous by adding the following new sec- 
tion: 

Section 7 

Self-Service Gas Stations 

1. Self-service gas stations shall mean that type of gas 
station wherein motor fuel is dispensed by anyone 
other than an employee of the gas station. 

2. Notwithstanding any other provision of this by-law, 
no self-service gas stations shall be permitted in the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

3. No person other than the service station owner or 
an authorized employee shall use or operate any 
motor fuel dispensing equipment at any service sta- 
tion. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. The 
Board of Selectmen are also in favor of this article. Chief 
Reid spoke about the article. 

Motion Carried 

Under Article 51 Chairman of the Planning Board 
Henrick R. Johnson Jr. moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law as follows: 

1. Amend Section 2600 Intensity of Use Schedule by 
referencing footnote "d" to the row label "Front 
(Feet)". 

2. Amend Article V. Definitions by revising the defini- 
tion of "Junk Yard", including deleting the last 
sentence thereof, so that it reads: 

"Junk Yard — The use of any area of any lot, 
whether inside or outside of a building, for the 
storage, keeping, or abandonment of junk, scrap, 
or discarded materials, or the dismantling, demoli- 
tion, or abandonment of automobiles, other 
vehicles, machinery, or parts thereof." 

Mr. Johnson then read the Planning Board Recom- 
mendation on this article: 

Based on its Public Hearing held on April 18, 1979, the 
Planning Board recommends that Article 51 be adopted 
for the following reasons: 

This article corrects two small mechanical problems in 
the existing zoning bylaw. Part 1 would reference an ex- 
isting footnote to the item it is supposed to apply to. The 
Footnote says that corner lots have to meet front yard re- 
quirements on both streets. The note should be applied to 
the "front yard" row in the Intensity of Use Schedule. 
This year's typo caused "label" to be printed "lavel" in the 
warrant, but the meaning is clear. 

The second part of Article 51 would resolve an incon- 
sistency regarding junk autos. Section 4170 of the Zoning 



46 



Bylaw as adopted in 1977 allows two unregistered 
vehicles. The last sentence of the definition "Junk Yard", 
however, would make even one unregistered auto illegal. 
It reads: "The keeping of such articles including 
unregistered, inoperative motor vehicles, shall constitute 
a junk yard regardless of the length of time that any one 
or more such remain on the premises." That provision 
was adopted in 1963, and overlooked in recent years until 
pointed out during the past year by the Building Inspec- 
tor. Removing that sentence removes the conflict, and 
leaves Section 4170 to deal with junk cars in a clear and 
direct manner. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 52 Chairman of the Planning Board 
moved to withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 53 John P. Richardson of the 
Historical Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
amend the Town By-Laws by adding a new section to Ar- 
ticle VII of the existing Town By-Laws; 

SECTION 6. DEMOLITION OF BUILDINGS 

1 . No bulding shall be demolished in whole or in part 
in the Town of Chelmsford without a permit from 
the Building Inspector. 

2. When an application for a permit for the demoli- 
tion of a building in whole or in part that is 100 yrs 
of age or older is made to the Building Inspector, 
the Applicant shall also furnish a copy of the re- 
quest to the Chelmsford Historical Commission and 
if said building is within the boundaries of the 
Chelmsford Historict District(s) a copy of the re- 
quest shall also be furnished to the Chelmsford His- 
toric District Commission. 

3. The Chelmsford Historical Commission shall sub- 
mit written recommendations to the Building In- 
spector and the Historic District Commission, if ap- 
plicable within fourteen (14) days of the receipt of 
an application for a permit to demolish any 
building in whole or in part that is 100 yrs or older. 
The Commission shall base its recommendation 
upon its review of the Historical, archeological, ar- 
chitectural, and/or cultural significance of the 
structure involved. If the Historical Commission 
does not submit a written recommendation to the 
Building Inspector and the Historic District Com- 
mission, when applicable as provided above, they 
shall be deemed to have approved the application 
for the permit. 

4. No permit shall be issued for the demolition of any 
building or structure, in whole or in part that is 100 
years of age or older unless there is a public hearing 
held thereon by the Board of Selectmen. The fin- 
dings and recommendation of the Board shall be 
furnished to the Building Inspector for his con- 
sideration. 



5. Notwithstanding anything contained in this By- 
Law to the contrary, the powers and duties of the 
Chelmsford Historic District Commission as 
established under Chapter 40C of the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as amend- 
ed by the Chelmsford Historic District By-Law, 
shall not be amended by this By-law. 

6. Any violation of this Article shall be punishable by 
a fine of two hundred ($200.00) Dollars. 

Richard Lahue of the Historical Commission explained 
the purpose of this article. A question was asked on why 
the fine could not be more than $200.00 dollars? It was 
explained by Town Counsel that the fine of $200.00 is the 
highest fine allowed by state law for Towns to charge if 
one of their by-laws is violated. More discussion followed. 
George Ripsom moved the question. A voice vote was 
taken on stopping debate. Motion carried, unanimously. 
A voice vote was taken on the main motion. Motion Car- 
ried. 

George Ripsom moved that the Town vote to recon- 
sider the Library Department Budget, this is pursuant to 
the mandate of Chapter 151 of the acts of 1979. This law 
supercedes the Town by-law on reconsidering any article 
or budget once the meeting that the business is acted on 
adjourns. A voice vote was taken on the motion to recon- 
sider. Motion carried. 

Mr. Dennis McHugh, Chairman of the Library 
Trustees, moved for the reconsideration of the Library 
Budget with the following amended figures. * (These 
Figures on the following line items are reduced from the 
original budget as presented on May 3, 1979: Line items 
120, 121, 122, 124, 125. As a result of a reduction in the 
line items the total figures will also be different than first 
recorded.) 



Library Department 




Salaries: 




114. Librarian 


17,611.00 


115. Assistant Director 


12,600.00 


116. Branch Librarian 


11,577.00 


117. Assistant Librarians 


115,998.00 


118. Library Aides 


6,890.00 


119. Custodian & Security 


24,441.00 


120. Vacation & Sickness 


3,360.00 


Total 


192,477.00 


Expenses: 




121 . Repair & Maint. of Buildings 


3,496.00 


122. Fuel, Light and Water 


12,748.00 


123. Books and Periodicals 


59,741.00 


124. Other expenses 


9,222.00 


125. Outlays 


1,056.00 


Total 


86,263.00 


Total Library Department 


278,740.00 


State Funds Received 


11,906.00 


Net Library Department 


266,834.00 



The Finance Committee is in favor of these figures as 
presented by Mr. McHugh. A discussion followed. Ken 
Tarbox moved the question. A voice vote was taken on 



47 



stopping debate. Motion carried, unanimously. A voice 
vote was taken on the Library Department Budget, this 
left the Chair in doubt, the tellers came forward for a 
hand count. Yes 187 No 14 motion carries. 

Mr. Ripsom moved that Article 68 be taken out of 
order. A voice vote was taken on the motion to take this 
article out of order, motion carried, unanimously. 

Under Article 68 Mr. George Ripsom moved that the 
Town vote to instruct the Board of Assessors to issue the 
sum of $823,679.00 from Free Cash in the Treasury for 
the reduction of the tax rate for the current fiscal period. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 54 Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws 
by recodifying Subsection 3250. Other Requirements 
(under Environmental Protection Standards) as Subsec- 
tion 3260 and further, by adding a new Subsection 3250 
to read as follows: 

3250. Solid Waste Storage. Any accessory receptacle or 
structure with holding capacity of at least 100 cubic feet 
for temporary storage or solid or liquid waste materials, 
including garbage, rubbish, junk, discarded bulk items, 
and similar waste items shall be located not less than ten 
feet from any structure and shall be screened from all ad- 
jacent premises and streets from which it would otherwise 
be visible in accordance with subsection 3423 of this By- 
Law. Screening materials will not be attached to any 
structure. 

Henrick Johnson Chairman of the Planning Board 
read the Board's recommendation. Based on its Public 
Hearing held on April 18, 1979 the Planning Board 
recommends the adoption of Article 54. The Fire Chief 
drew our attention to a problem. Dumpsters are being 
placed right next to buildings, creating a fire hazard. 
This amendment would require that Dumpsters and 
similar trash receptacles be kept at least ten feet away 
from buildings, and would require them to be visually 
screened. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 55 Mr. Andrew P. Boumil moved that 
the Town vote to amend the Town of Chelmsford Zoning 
By-Laws Adopted at Town Meeting 1977 (Articles 50, 51 
& 52) by changing the type of district of a parcel of land 
on the southerly side of Richardson Road, presently zon- 
ed single family residential district to limited industrial 
district, said land being described as follows: 

Being a parcel of land situated in the Town of Chelms- 
ford and being a portion of the premises conveyed by An- 
drew Boumil to Andrew P. Boumil dated May 23, 1964, 
and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1648, Page 374, described as follows: 

The land in that part of Chelmsford known as North 
Chelmsford, with the buildings thereon, containing 
about six acres, situated on the southerly or southeasterly 



side of the so called Richardson Road, being the Road 
leading from the Old Middlesex Turnpike to the Edward 
F. Richardson Farm, and thus bounded: 

Beginning at a stone bound on the southerly side of 
said Road at the northeasterly corner of land formerly of 
Francis Richardson, supposed to be now or formerly of 
one Dunnigan; thence S. 77 2/3 degrees E. on said last 
mentioned land, five hundred thirty-nine and 22/100 
feet to land conveyed by James Pike Jr. to Nathaniel 
Blood by deed dated February 26, 1849, and recorded 
with Middlesex Deeds (now South District) in Book 556, 
Page 496, supposed to be land of one Richardson, now or 
formerly; thence N. 13V4 degrees E. on said last mention- 
ed land, four hundred forty-eight and 80/100 feet to land 
formerly of Joseph Reed, supposed to be now or formerly 
of one Richardson; thence 77 degrees W. on said last 
mentioned land, ninety-one and 15/100 feet to an oak 
stump with stones about it; thence N. 30 degrees W. still 
on said last mentioned land, two hundred ninety-five and 
02/100 feet to a stone bound at said Richardson Road; 
thence Westerly on said Road, seven hundred twenty- 
four and 68/100 feet to the point of beginning, be said 
contents or any or all of said measurements more or less 
and however otherwise and premises may be measured, 
bounded, or described. Excluding and excepting from 
this deed any of the aforementioned land that has 
heretofore been conveyed by said Andrew Boumil by 
deed. 

Henrick Johnson, Chairman of the Planning Board, 
read the Board's recommendation on this article. Based 
on its review of the proposal and its public hearing held 
on April 18, 1979 the Planning Board recommends the 
adoption of Article 55 because it would eliminate a non- 
comforming use, and there is no way in which this IA 
zone could be further extended in a residential zone since 
it is bounded by the Highway Department Garage and 
Water District Land. 

The Finance Committee recommends this article. 

A Voice vote was taken on this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 56 Howard Ryan moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws to change 
from Single Residence District (RB) to Roadside (CB) the 
following described land owned by Howard Ryan and 
Marilyn Ryan: 

A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon 
situated on the Southwesterly side of North Road and 
bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point 
at the intersection of the Southwesterly side of North 
Road with the Southeasterly side of Columbia Street; 
thence running Southeasterly by said North Road two 
hundred and 14/100 (200.14) feet to Richardson Street; 
thence turning and running Southwesterly by said 
Richardson Street two hundred four (204) feet to Lot 
numbered thirty (30) on a plan of land hereinafter men- 
tioned; thence turning and running Northwesterly by 
said Lot numbered thirty (30) and by Lot numbered 
thirty-one (31) on said plan, two hundred (200) feet to 



48 



Columbia Street; thence Northeasterly by Columbia 
Street one hundred (100) feet; thence Southeasterly by 
Lot numbered eight (8) and a portion of lot numbered 
nine (9) seventy-five (75) feet; thence running North- 
easterly by land now or formerly of Rumley seventy-one 
(71) feet; thence turning and running Northerly by land 
now or formerly of Rumley, being the remaining portions 
of Lots numbered eight (8) and nine (9) on said plan 
seventy-eight (78) feet more or less to the point of beginn- 
ing. 

Being Lots numbered ten (10) and eleven (11) and the 
Southerly twenty five feet of Lot numbered nine (9) and a 
portion of Lot numbered eight (8) and Lots twenty (20) 
and twenty-one (21), twenty-eight (28) and twenty-nine 
(29) as shown on plan of land entitled: "Plan of Columbia 
Park, North Chelmsford, Mass., as Surveyed for P.T. 
McMahon, dated July 1902", recorded with North Mid- 
dlesex Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 19, Plan 40." 

Henrick Johnson, Chairman of the Planning Board, 
gave the Board's recommendation. Based on its review of 
the plan and its public hearing held on April 18, 1979, 
the Planning Board recommends the adoption of Article 
56, since it would eliminate a non-conforming use and if 
not adopted would place a hardship on the owner, who 
has been in business in this location for twelve years. 

Ann McCarthy of the Planning Board was against 
passage of this article. 

The Finance Committee was against this article. 

Richard McCarthy questioned the quorum. A count of 
voters present was taken by the counters, there were 218 
voters present, the meeting was continued. Patricia Cur- 
rie moved the question. Motion carried. A voice vote was 
taken on this article. Motion Defeated. 

Under Article 57 Stan Norkunas moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Town of Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws 
to change from limited Industrial District (IA) to General 
Residence (RC) the following parcels of land, all located 
in the North Section of Chelmsford near the intersection 
of Middlesex Stret and that portion of Church Street run- 
ning in a Northeasterly direction from Middlesex Street 
to the B&M Railroad tracks; those specific parcels of land 
located at 74 Middlesex Street (Town of Chelmsford 
Assessor's Plat 4, lot 5) 78 & 80 Middlesex Street (Town of 
Chelmsford Assessor Plat 4 lot 4), 82 & 84 Middlesex 
Street (Town of Chelmsford Assessor's Plat 4 lot 3), 92 
Middlesex Street (Town of Chelmsford Assessor's Plat 4, 
lot 2), 94 & 96 Middlesex Street (Town of Chelmsford 
Assessor's Plat 3, lot 8A), 102 Middlesex Street (Town of 
Chelmsford Assessor's Plat 3, Lot 7A), 58 Church Street 
(Town of Chelmsford Assessor's Plat 4 lot 6), 59 Church 
Street (Town of Chelmsford Assessor's Plat 3, lot 8B), 60 
Church Street (Town of Chelmsford Assessor's Plat 4, lot 
7), 61 Church Street (Town of Chelmsford Assessor's Plat 
3, lot 8C), 64 Church Street (Town of Chelmsford 
Assessor's Plat 4, lot 8). 

Henrick Johnson, Chairman of the Planning Board 
read the Board's recommendation on this article. Based 
on its review of the plan and its public hearing held on 



April 18, 1979, the Planning Board recommends against 
the adoption of Article 57 due to the fact that the plan as 
proposed will leave a very jagged zoning line, conforming 
to the boundaries of each individual lot, and the street 
would still be zoned industrially, thus making it extreme- 
ly difficult to determine actual zoning. The Board feels 
that the zoning lines are not properly delineated. 

Mr. Johnson then gave his own personal opinion on this 
article. He felt that this article should be passed. 

Mr. Norkunas explained why he felt the article should 
be passed. 

The Finance Committee recommends passage of this 
article. 

Dennis Ready moved the question. Motion Carried, 
unanimously. A voice vote was taken on the article, which 
left the chair in doubt. A Hand count was taken on the 
article. Yes 161 No 16, Motion Carried. 

Under Article 58 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
in fee simple, by eminent domain or purchase or enter in- 
to a lease agreement for a certain parcel of land with the 
trees and structures thereon, adjacent to the land of the 
Town of Chelmsford known as the Swain Road Landfill, 
said land owned now or formerly by Manfred and 
Carolina Abrahamson containing approximately 41,761 
square feet of land and being a portion of a parcel 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
Registry of Deeds in Book 740 at Page 382; said portion 
to be purchased or taken being set forth on a plan entitl- 
ed "Sketch Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. prepared 
for the Town of Chelmsford, scale 1 in =100 feet 
December 1977, Emmons, Fleming and Bienvenu, 
Engineers and Surveyors," and for the purpose of acquir- 
ing said land and for the purposes of paying in whole or 
in part, any damages for which the Town may be liable 
by reason of the taking of said land by eminent domain 
to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate th 
sum of $4,200.00 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
are in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 59 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
in fee simple, by eminent domain or purchase or enter in- 
to a lease agreement for a certain parcel of land with the 
trees and structures thereon, adjacent to the land of the 
Town of Chelmsford known as Swain Road Landfill, said 
land owned now or formerly by Frederick Abrahamson 
containing 45,284 square feet of land and being a portion 
of a parcel described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1060 at Page 72; 
said portion to be purchased or taken being set forth on a 
plan entitled "Sketch Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. 
prepared for the Town of Chelmsford, scale 1 in = 100 
feet, December 1977, Emmons, Fleming and Bienvenu, 
Engineers and Surveyors," and for the purpose of acquir- 
ing said land and for the purposes of paying, in whole or 



49 



in part, any damages for which the Town may be liable 
by reason of the taking of said land by eminent domain, 
to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $3,625.00 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
are in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 60 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
in fee simple, by eminent domain or purchase or enter in- 
to a leasing agreement for a certain parcel of land with 
the trees and structures thereon, adjacent to the land of 
the Town of Chelmsford known as the Swain Road Land- 
fill, said land owned by Lennart W. Leedberg, Jr. and 
Pauline R. Leedberg containing approximately 48,806 
square feet of land and being a portion of a parcel 
described in the Assessors Maps at Plat 70 Lot 17; said 
portion to be purchased or taken being set forth on a plan 
entitled "Sketch Plan of Land in Chelmsford, Mass. 
prepared for the Town of Chelmsfrd, scale 1 in =100 
feet, December 1977, Emmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, 
Engineers & Surveyors," and for the purpose of acquiring 
said land and for the purpose of paying in whole or in 
part, any damages for which the Town may be liable by 
reason of the taking of said land by eminent domain, to 
see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $3,925.00. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
are in favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 61 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
in fee simple, by eminent domain or purchase or enter in- 
to a leasing agreement a certain parcel of land with the 
trees and structures thereon adjacent to land of the Town 
of Chelmsford known as the Swain Road Landfill, said 
land owned now or formerly by Manuel S. and Maria c. 
Moreira containing approximately 78,955 square feet of 
land being a portion of a parcel described in a deed 
recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in 
Book 2179 at Page 214; said portion to be purchased or 
taken being set forth on a plan entitled "Sketch Plan of 
Land in Chelmsford, Mass. prepared for the Town of 
Chelmsford, scale 1 in=100 feet, December 1977, Em- 
mons, Fleming and Bienvenu, Engineers and Surveyors," 
and for the purposes of paying, in whole or in part, any 
damages for which the Town may be liable by reason of 
the taking of said land by eminent domain, to see if the 
Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,325.00. 

The Selectmen and the Finance Committee are in 
favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 62 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to amend the General By-Laws Article VI 



Police Regulations by adding the following section: 

Section 19. Prohibition on Leaving Motor Vehicles 
in Certain Private Ways: 

.1 It shall be unlawful to leave any motor vehicle un- 
attended within the limits of any private way fur- 
nishing means of access for fire apparatus to any 
building. 

2. It shall be unlawful to obstruct or park a motor 
vehicle in any fire lane, such Fire Lane to be 
designated by the Chief of the Fire Department 
and shall be posted as s.uch. Said Fire Lane to be 
eighteen (18) feet wide for all buildings in any shop- 
ping center, bowling alley, theatre, nursing home, 
office building, or other public building. The 
establishment of Fire Lanes as set forth above shall 
be at the sole discretion of the Chief of the Fire 
Department and shall run from the wall of the 
building or any overhang of the building or any 
sidewalk adjacent thereto. 

3. The record owner of each building upon notifica- 
tion of the designation of a Fire Lane by the Chief 
of the Fire Department, shall provide and install 
signs posting the area as such as provided in para- 
graph 2. 

4. The Police Department and all members thereof 
assigned to traffic duty, are hereby authorized to 
remove and tow away, or have removed and towed 
away by commercial towing service, at the sole ex- 
pense of the owner of said motor vehicle, any motor 
vehicle left unattended or parked in any designated 
Fire Lane or within the limits of any private way 
furnishing means of access for fire apparatus to any 
building. Motor vehicles so towed away shall be 
stored in a safe place and restored to the owner or 
operator thereof upon payment by the owner or 
operator of the expenses incurred in said removal 
and storage. 

5. Violations of this by-law shall be punishable as pro- 
vided in General By-Laws Article 1. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of this article. Chief 
Reid of the Fire Department spoke in favor of this article 
also. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 63 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to accept the following mentioned streets as 
laid out by the Board of Selectman and shown by their 
reports and plans duly filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk: 

Wagontrail Road Extension 
Lovett Lane 
Lafayette Terrace 

Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen and subject to the 
withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met. 



50 



The Selectmen and Finance Committee recommend 
this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

The Moderator made a point of order. Due to the 
reduction in figures under the Library Department 
Budget the article that was read at the beginning of this 
evening's session, concerning the appropriations and 
budget limit for fiscal year 1980 the original figures as 
read must be revised as follows: 

Selectman Hart moved that the Town vote to increase 
the appropriations and budget limit established under 
Chapter 151 of Acts of 1979 so that the Towns appropria- 
tions and budget limit for fiscal year 1980 shall be 
$24,464,871.00 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 64 Selectman Hart moved that the town 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey all 
right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town, for con- 
sideration to be determined of not less than $1,050.00 in 
a parcel of land and buildings thereon, if any, located on 
Stearns Street as shown on Assessors Map Plat 241, Lot 
258, containing approximately 5,000 square feet of land. 

The Selectmen and Finance Committee recommend 
this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 65 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey 
all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town, for 
consideration to be determined of not less than $600.00 
in a parcel of land and buldings thereon, if any, located 
on Bentley Lane Plat 204, Lot 28A containing approx- 
imately .08 acres and Plat 204, Lot 29A containing ap 
proximately .08 acres. 

The Selectmen and the Finance Committee are in 
favor of this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 66 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey 
all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town for 
consideration to be determined of not less than $1,750.00 
in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, if any, located 
on Turnpike Road and Mill Road containing approx- 
imately 1.61 acres shown on Assessor's Maps Plat 127 as 
Lot 72. 

The Selectmen and the Finance Committee are in 
favor of this article. 

John Balco spoke against this article. Mr. Balco asked 
for what purpose this land is being sold. Selectman Hart 
explained that a present business located on Mill Road 
needed the land for further access for their property. Also 
another party is interested in possibly purchasing this 
property. Mr. Balco stated that the location would not be 



a good one because of the situation already present. A 
dangerous hill is located right next to the area in ques- 
tion. Another neighbor who lives on Turnpike Road 
agreed with Mr. Balco's statement. 

The motion was defeated by a voice vote. 

Under Article 67 Selectman Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey 
all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town for 
consideration to be determined of not less than $2,000.00 
in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, if any, located 
on Rivermeadow Road as shown on Assessor's Map Plat 
130 Lot 123 containing approximately 37,973 square feet 
of land. 

The Selectmen and the Finance Committee recom- 
mend this article. 

A discussion followed. 

The Motion Carried by voice vote, unanimously. 

Selectman Towle moved to adjourn the Annual Town 
Meeting without another day. Motion Carried. This 
meeting adjourned at 11:10 PM. 



Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



TOTAL R&A $23,324,822.00 

TOTAL TRANSFERS 959,500.00 

Annual Town Meting April 30, 1979 

100,000.00 Transfers Special Town Meeting May 14, 
1979 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

October 15, 1979 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Auditorium on Monday Evening, the fifteenth day 
of October, 1979, at 7:30 P.M. o'clock then and there to 
act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map to change 



51 



from Limited Industrial District (1-A) to Roadside Com- 
mercial District (CB) the land situated on the easterly side 
of Parkhurst Road in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, 
Massachusetts bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of Route 3 
(Middlesex Turnpike) at the Easterly side of Parkhurst 
Road; thence running Northerly, Northwesterly and 
Northerly by land now or formerly of John F. Brady et al 
in three courses, each approximately 100 feet, 650 feet 
and 750 feet respectively; thence running Westerly still by 
land now or formerly of said Brady, approximately 173 
feet; thence running Northerly still by land now or 
formerly of said Brady, approximately 205 feet to the 
Lowell -Chelmsford Town Line; thence running North- 
westerly along the said Town Line approximately 500 feet 
to the easterly side of Parkhurst Road; thence running 
Southerly by the easterly line of said Parkhurst Road, ap- 
proximately 1550 feet to the point of beginning; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
and empower the Selectmen to appoint an executive 
secretary who may be appointed by them for a term of 
one or three years and to remove him at their discretion 
as provided in Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41 
Section 23 A; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary Administration By-Law 
under Section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law" by adding the following position under 
Administrative and Clerical: 

13. EXECUTIVE SECRETARY and to further 
amend Section 24 by setting a Grade Level or 
Salary Range for the position of Executive 
Secretary; or act in relation thereto. 

Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the Recreation Department Salary Ac- 
count, Line Item 154 for the purpose of providing part 
time custodial services; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $7,000.00 from the Sales of Graves and Lots to 
the Cemetery Improvement and Development Account; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be expended by the Tree Warden for the 
timely alleviation of the Gypsy Moth infestation in af- 
fected areas of the Town; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$15,000.00 for the purpose of eradicating mosquitoes by 
means of aerial spraying or other appropriate means 
under the supervision of the Board of Health; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town under and pursuant 
to authority granted in General Laws Chapter 40D, Sec- 
tion 21 (g) as amended, will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to enter into a contract with users or operators 
of solid waste disposal facilities established or to be 
established for the disposal of refuse, garbage and waste 
and for the purchase or use of by-products resulting from 
the operation of such facilities that in the discretion of the 
Board of Selectmen best accommodates the needs of the 
Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be transferred to the following account: 
"210. Selectmen's Department: Selectmen's Administra- 
tive Assistant" and to amend the line item to read 



210. Selectmen's Administrative Assistant and 
ecutive Secretary; or act in relation thereto. 



Ex 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will raise and ap- 
propriate or transfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of purchasing four (4) radar 
units for the Police Department; or act in relation 
thereto. 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate funds to be raised and/or transferred from 
available funds, said funds to be used to reinstate school 
bus service to that provided in the 1978/1979 school year; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to appro- 
priate funds which will be raised and/or transferred from 
available funds, as required, said funds to be used to 
reinstate school bus service on previously established 
routes where busing is now deemed warranted due to 
hazardous conditions as affirmed through process of pro- 
posal, study and subsequent concurrence of the school 
committee members and residents of the subject route 
area; or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



Petition 



52 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the appropriations and budget limit established 
under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 so that the town's 
appropriations and budget limit for fiscal year 1980 shall 
be a certain sum of money; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the budget limit established under Chapter 151 
of the Acts of 1979 for the School Department so that the 
School Department Budget for fiscal year 1980 shall be 
established at a certain sum of money; or act in relation 
thereto. 

School Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 28th day of September. A.D. 
1979. 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Bonita Towle 

Bradford O. Emerson 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



SEPTEMBER 28, 1979 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 
School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gymnasium, C. 
Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South Row School 
Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; Fire House-Old Westford Road, four- 
teen days at least before the time appointed for holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



posting of the warrant be waived. It was so voted 
unanimously. Selectman Hart then moved that the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously. 

The Moderator then presented to the Town Meeting 
Body two students of the American Field Service (AFS) 
Foreign Students, who are staying with two Chelmsford 
families and are attending the Town Meeting. They are 
Agnes Guhl from Sion in Switzerland, and Ilkka Rauvola 
from Turku in Finland. 



Under Article 1 Joseph Maher moved that the Town 
vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws and Zon- 
ing Map to change from Limited Industrial District (I-A) 
to Roadside Commercial District (CB) the land situated 
on the easterly side of Parkhurst Road in Chelmsford, 
Middlesex County, Massachusetts bounded and described 
as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the Northerly side of Route 3 
(Middlesex Turnpike) at the Easterly side of Parkhurst 
Road; thence running Northerly, Northwesterly and 
Northerly by land now or formerly of John F. Brady et al 
in three courses, each approximately 100 feet, 650 feet 
and 750 feet respectively; thence running Westerly still by 
land now or formerly of said Brady, approximately 175 
feet; thence running Northerly still by land now or 
formerly of said Brady, approximately 205 feet to the 
Lowell-Chelmsford Town Line; thence running North- 
westerly along the said Town Line approximately 500 feet 
to the easterly side of Parkhurst Road; thence running 
Southerly by the easterly line of said Parkhurst Road, ap- 
proximately 1550 feet to the point of beginning. 

Ann McCarthy of the Planning Board gave the Board's 
recommendation of this article: Based on its review of the 
proposal and its public hearing held on October 11, 
1979, the Planning Board recommends the Town vote to 
amend the Zoning By-Laws on the Easterly side of 
Parkhurst Road, presently zoned IA (Industrial) to CB 
(Roadside Commercial). 

The Finance Committee recommended this article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Under Article 2 Selectman Hart moved that the Town 
vote to authorize and empower the Selectmen to appoint 
an executive secretary who may be appointed by them for 
a term of one or three years and to remove him at the 
discretion as provided in Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter 41 Section 23A. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

October 15, 1979 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 8:05 
PM by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 869 
voters present. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that the 
reading of the Constable's return of service and the 



Selectman Emerson spoke in favor on this article. 
Selectman Carson also spoke in favor. The Finance Com- 
mittee was also in favor. Norman LaBrecque and Frank 
Towle spoke against this article. After a lengthy discus- 
sion Stephen Brovender moved the question to stop 
debate. Motion Carried, unanimously. A voice vote was 
taken on the motion, which left the chair in doubt. The 
following tellers came forward: 



53 



Joseph Maher 
Julian Zabierek 
Dennis Ready 
Margaret Johnson 
John Fudge 
Edward Hilliard 
Harold Organ 



Carl Olsson 

Clement McCarthy 

Carol Stark 

Richard Burtt 

Edward Marshall 

Dorothy Lerer 

Eugene Doody 



Norman LaBrecque 

The result of the hand count 374 Yes, 316 No. Motion 
Carried. 

Under Article 3 Barbara Ward of the Personnel 
Board, moved that the Town vote to amend the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary Administration By-Law under Sec- 
tion 24 subtitled "Job Titles and Standard Rates for 
Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By- 
Law" by adding the following position under Ad- 
ministrative and Clerk. 

14. Executive Secretary — Grade Level 17 — Salary 
Range $21,200.00-$29,560.00. 

Barbara Ward spoke in favor of this article, the Per- 
sonnel Board felt that this range is consistent and com- 
parable with other towns with a population as Chelms- 
ford's. Selectman Shanahan spoke in favor of this article. 

George Ripsom and Katherine Hughes, co-chairmen of 
the Finance Committee moved to amend the main mo- 
tion by changing the Grade Level and Salary Range as 
follows: 

Grade Level 15-Salary Range $19,530.00 
$26,951.00 

Mr. Ripsom spoke on his motion. Selectman Emerson 
stated that the Selectmen will support Mr. Ripsom's mo- 
tion. 

A voice vote was taken on the motion to amend. Mo- 
tion Carried. 

Edward Hilliard moved the question to stop debate. 
Motion Carried. 

The Moderator attempted to take a voice vote which 
left him in doubt, the tellers came forward, the result Yes 
356 No 305. 

Motion Carried. 

Robert Geary moved to take articles 11 & 12 out of 
order after the completion of article 4. Motion Carried to 
take these two articles out of order by a voice vote. 

Under Article 4 Selectman Hart moved that the Town 
vote to transfer from free cash the sum of $3600.00 to be 
transferred to the following account: "210. Selectmen's 
Department: Selectmen's Administrative Assistant" and 
to amend the line item to read 210. Selectmen's Ad- 
ministrative Assistant and Executive Secretary and to vote 
to further increase the appropriations limit and budget 
limit established under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 
by the specific amount of $3600.00. 



The Finance Committee moved to amend this article as 
follows: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend line item 210: 
"Selectmen's Department: Selectmen's Administrative 
Assistant" to read "210. Selectmen's Assistant and Ex- 
ecutive Secretary" and instruct the Selectmen to return to 
a special Town Meeting within the 1980 Annual Town 
Meeting with a request for transfer from the available 
funds of such a sum of money as may be required to fund 
that position through the remainder of the fiscal year. 

A Voice vote was taken on the Finance Committee's 
motion to amend. Motion defeated. 

Dennis Ready moved the question to stop debate. Mo- 
tion Carried, unanimously. A hand vote was then taken 
on the main motion, which required a 2/3 vote. Yes 297, 
No 374, the motion was defeated. James Geary moved for 
reconsideration of this article, Motion Defeated, by voice. 

Under Article 11 Harry Siddley moved that the Town 
vote to appropriate $19,000.00 to be transferred from 
free cash, said funds to be used to reinstate school bus ser- 
vice to that provided in the 1978/1979 school year and to 
vote to further increase the appropriations limit and 
budget limit established under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 
1979 by the specific amount of $19,000.00. 

The Finance Committee was not in favor of this mo- 
tion. A number of speakers spoke against this article. A 
lengthy discussion followed. Joseph Maher moved the 
question to stop debate. A voice vote was taken which left 
the chair in doubt, the tellers came forward. Yes 413, No 
219, a 2/3 vote was needed and not obtained — the debate 
continued. 

Michael Rukin moved to amend the main motion: To 
see if the Town will vote to instruct the School Committee 
to transfer from available funds sufficient funds to 
reinstate School Bus Service to that provided in the 1978/ 
1979 school year and return to a Special Town Meeting 
within the 1980 Annual Town Meeting with a request to 
transfer from then available free cash sufficient funds for 
continuing this service through the end of the fiscal year. 

William McDonough requested a point of order and 
asked for a ruling from Town Counsel concerning this 
amendment. Counselor Harrington ruled this motion out 
of order. Mr. Rukin then spoke on the main motion, he 
then requested another motion be accepted. 

"Request that article 11 be amended by deleting "in 
the 1978/1979 school year" and inserting in it's place "as 
was usual and customary in the 1974/1975 school year." 

This motion was ruled out of order by the Moderator. 
More lengthy discussion followed, a number of speakers 
spoke in favor of this motion. Dennis Ready moved the 
question to stop debate. Motion carried unanimously, by 
voice vote. A hand count was taken on the main motion 
Yes 269, No 327, a 2/3's vote was required, Motion 
defeated. 

Patrick Meyer moved to reconsider this article. A voice 
vote was taken motion defeated. 



54 



William McDonough moved to adjourn, without fur- 
ther date. A voice vote was taken which left the chair in 
doubt, the tellers came forward. The result of the hand 
count, Yes 144 No 290, the meeting continued. 

Under Article 12 Harry Siddley moved that the Town 
vote to appropriate $19,000.00 to be transferred from 
free cash, said funds to be used to reinstate school bus ser- 
vice on previously established routes where busing is now 
deemed warranted due to hazardous conditions as affirm- 
ed through process of proposal, study and subsequent 
concurrence of the School Committee members and 
residents of the subject route area and to vote to further 
increase the appropriations limit and budget limit 
established under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 by the 
specific amount of $19,000.00. 

Arnold Lovering moved the question to stop debate. 
Motion Carried, unanimously by voice. A hand count was 
taken on the main motion Yes 179 No 280. The motion 
was defeated. 

William McDonough moved to adjourn until Thursday 
night October 18th at the same time and place. Motion 
defeated by voice. George Ripsom moved to adjourn 
without another further date, this motion was also 
defeated by a voice vote. 

Harry Fardy moved to reconsider Article 12. Motion is 
defeated by voice vote. 

Under Article 3 Selectman Hart moved that the Town 
vote to transfer from free cash the sum of $3600.00 for 
the purpose of purchasing four (4) radar units for the 
Police Department and to vote to further increase the ap- 
propriations limit and budget limit established under 
Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 by the specific amount of 
$3600.00. 

The Moderator was handed an amendment for the 
above article and wished to take a brief recess to confer 
with the writer of the motion. Michael Rukin then ques- 
tioned the quorum. A hand count was taken as to deter- 
mine the number of voters present. The result was only 
185 voters present. Selectman Shanahan moved to ad- 
journ this meeting due to the Town By-Laws requiring 
300 voters present. Selectman Shanahan moved to ad- 
journ until Thursday night October 18th the same time 
and place. Motion Carried. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

October 18, 1979 

The Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, does not recognize 
the presence of a quorum. There are only 165 voters pre- 
sent. The Town of Chelmsford By-Law states that 300 
voters present are needed to conduct a special town 
meeting. The Moderator moved to adjourn sine die. Mo- 
tion Carried. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 13, 1979 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Auditorium on Thursday Evening, the thirteenth 
day of December 1979, at 7:30 o'clock then and there to 
act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following Policy for the safe transportation of School 
Children: 

TRANSPORTATION POLICY 

It is the policy of the Town of Chelmsford to provide 
transportation to those pupils whose health, distance 
from school, or safety makes this service essential. In 
establishing the policy, the Town of Chelmsford will: 

1. As a minimum, provide daily transportation to all 
students who meet the following criteria for "portal 
to portal" distance from their schools: 

Elementary Schools - Grade K Miles 

All others 0.25 Miles 

Junior High and for Middle Schools 0.5 Miles 

High School 1.0 Miles 

2. Not require any student to walk more than 0.25 
miles on any streets which do not contain sidewalks, 
either to their school or bus stop. 

3. Not require any student to walk on a street 
designated by the School Committee or the Board 
of Selectmen as "unsafe for extensive student walk- 
ing." 

4. Endeavor to provide the safest possible school bus 
transportation and student walking programs. 

5. Operate its school transportation system as effi- 
ciently and economically as possible. 

6. Maintain conditions on the buses which are to the 
best interests of the pupils from mental, moral and 
physical viewpoints or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 2. In the event of an affirmative vote, under 
Article 1 , to see if the Town will vote to direct the Board 
of Selectmen and/or the School Committee to request in- 



55 



sertion of an article in a Special Town Meeting to be held 
within the 1980 Annual Town Meeting, said article re- 
questing an appropriation and/or transfer of then avail- 
able funds for the purpose of continuing school busing 
service in accordance with the Policy for the Safe 
Transportation of School Children; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds, or direct 
the School Committee to expend from its available funds 
an amount sufficient to immediately implement school 
busing services in accordance with the policy for the Safe 
Transportation of School Children enumerated in Article 
1; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be expended by the Tree Warden for the 
timely alleviation of the Gypsy Moth infestation in af- 
fected areas of the Town; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$15,000.00 for the purpose of eradicating mosquitoes by 
means of aerial spraying or other appropriate means 
under the supervision of the Board of Health; or act in 
relation thereto. 



2. Line Item 67 Regular and Substitute Account; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from availble funds a certain sum 
of money to the following named accounts in the Police 
Department: 

1. Line Item 139 Officers and Administration 

2. Line Item 140 Regular and Special Account 

3. Line Item 142 Maintenance and Equipment; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the budget limit established under Chapter 151 
of the Acts of 1979 for the School Department so that the 
School Department Budget for fiscal year 1980 shall be 
established at a certain sum of money; or act in relation 
thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to further 
increase the appropriations and budget limit established 
under Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 so that the Town's 
appropriations and budget limit for fiscal year 1980 shall 
be a certain sum of money; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $7 , 000 . 00 from the Sales of Graves and Lots to 
the Cemetery Improvement and Development Account; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the following named account: Highway 
Department Line Item 94 Labor-Men; or act in relation 
thereto. 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 28th day of November, 
A.D., 1979. 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

John W. Carson 

Bonita A. Towle 

Bradford O. Emerson 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



NOVEMBER 28, 1979 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the following named account in the 
Cemetery Department: Line Item 32 General Labor; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to the following named accounts in the Fire 
Department: 

1. Line Item 66 Officers and Administration 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: Center School Auditorium; North Elementary 
School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 
School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gymnasium, C. 
Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South Row School 
Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; Fire House-Old Westford Road, four- 
teen days at least before the time appointed for holding 
the meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



56 



A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 13, 1979 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:57 
PM by the Town Clerk Mary E. St.Hilaire, who recogniz- 
ed the presence of a quorum. There were 363 voters pre- 
sent. Due to the absence of the Moderator Daniel J. 
Coughlin Jr. who was in the hospital recovering from 
cosmetic surgery, a Temporary Moderator had to be 
elected by the Town Meeting body, for tonight's meeting. 
The Town Clerk asked for nominations from the floor for 
the position. Selectman Shanahan nominated James Har- 
rington. No other name was submitted, nominations clos- 
ed. A voice vote was taken on James Harrington as Tem- 
porary Moderator. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Town Clerk then called for a brief recess, while she swore 
the Temporary Moderator into office. 

Temporary Moderator Harrington called the meeting 
back to order. Selectman Joseph Shanahan moved that 
the reading of the Constable's return of service and the 
posting of the warrant be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously. Selectmen Shanahan then moved that the 
reading of the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, 
unanimously. 

Under Article 1 Mr. Michael Rukin moved that the 
Town vote to adopt the following Policy for the safe 
transportation of School Children: 

TRANSPORTATION POLICY 

It is the policy of the Town of Chelmsford to provide 
transportation to those pupils whose health, distance 
from school, or safety makes this service essential. In 
establishing the policy, the Town of Chelmsford will: 

1. As a minimum, provide daily transportation to all 
students who meet the following criteria for "portal 
to portal" distance from their schools: 

Elementary Schools-Grade K miles 

All others 0.25 miles 

Junior High and for Middle Schools 0.5 miles 

High School 1 .0 miles 

2. Not require any student to walk more than 0.25 
miles on any streets which do not contain sidewalks, 
either to their school or bus stop. 

Mr. Ripsom of the Finance Committee spoke about the 
article and stated that the committee was not in favor of 
this article. 

Mr. Rukin then presented to the Town Meeting body a 
report explaining the article. A lengthy discussion follow- 
ed with a number of people speaking for and against the 
article. Dennis Ready moved the question to stop debate. 
This requires a 2/3 vote. The Temporary Moderator at- 



tempted to take a voice vote which failed. 
The following tellers were called forward: 



Ruth Delaney 
Norman LeBrecque 
Dennis Ready 
Edward Marshall 
Carl Olsson 



Dorothy Lerer 

Richard Burtt 

Sandy Kilburn 

Margaret Johnson 

Walter Lewis 



The result of the hand count Yes 312 No 22 Motion 
Carried. 

A voice vote was taken on the main motion. Motion 
carried. Mr. Michael Rukin then moved for reconsidera- 
tion of this article. A voice vote was taken for reconsidera- 
tion, Motion is defeated. 

Under Article 2 Mr. George Ripsom moved to dismiss 
this article. Motion carried by voice. John Hanlon then 
moved for reconsideration of this article. Motion 
defeated by voice. 

Under Article 3 Mr. George Ripsom moved to dismiss 
this article. Motion carried by voice. Mr. John Arnold 
moved for reconsideration of this article. Motion 
defeated by voice. 

Under Article 4 Selectman Carson moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from free cash to the insect pest 
control expense line item 108 "insect pest control ex- 
penses" the sum of $10,000 for the timely alleviation of 
the Gypsy moth infestation in affected areas of Town. 

Selectman Carson then moved to amend this article by 
adding the following amendment: "Provided that the 
manner of Gypsy Moth Control be determined by the In- 
sect Pest Control Officer on the basis of recommendations 
to be made by an Advisory Committee of five persons to 
be appointed by the Selectmen." 

A discussion followed. Alan Fidler spoke about this arti- 
cle and explained why this type of control was needed. 
Mr. Arthur Reid spoke against this article, but expressed 
that he was in favor of the amendment. A voice vote was 
taken on the motion to amend. Motion Carried. A voice 
vote was taken on the main motion which left the chair in 
doubt, the Tellers came forward. Before a hand count 
could be taken on the main motion John Hanlon question- 
ed the presence of a quorum. The Tellers were instructed 
to count the number of voters left in the hall. There were 
only 279 present, the quorum requirement is 300. Select- 
man Shanahan moved to adjourn Sine die, Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Town Meeting adjourned at 9:57 
PM. 



James Harrington 
Temporary Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



57 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Major changes continue to occur in the assessing field 
in Massachusetts and around the country. Last year's an- 
nual report discussed the Classification Amendment and 
its probable effect on Chelmsford's tax base. Since that 
time, Chapter 797 of the Acts of 1979, known as the 
Cohen Amendment, was enacted making extensive modi- 
fications in the original classification bill. The assessors 
feel that it has been an improvement since it gives each 
local governing body the power to determine the levels at 
which the four different classes of property (residential, 
industrial, commercial and open space) will be assessed. 
Certain limits have been set so that no single class of pro 
perty can be unfairly impacted. There is also the option 
of taxing all classes of property at the same rate (our 
residential property currently bears 83% of the tax 
burden). This will be the first time that the Board of 
Selectmen will be directly involved in the tax setting pro 
cess. 

Fiscal 1980 showed a decrease in the tax rate from 
$57.50 per thousand dollars of valuation to $53 or a 
decrease of seven percent. This reflected an increase in 
real estate valuation of $6,118,020 and in personal pro- 
perty valuation of $48,435. There was also an increase of 

M.V. Excise Levy of 79 

Abatements Levy of 79 
M.V. Excise Levy of 78 

Abatements Levy of 78 
M.V. Excise Levy of 77 

Abatement Levy of 77 
Real Estate Tax 
R.E. Omitted Assessment 
No. of Dwellings 
Personal Property Tax 
Excise Abatements 

Levy of 76 

Levy of 75 

Levy of 74 

Levy of 73 



No. 


Issued 


26,989 


Total Tax 


No. 


Granted 


3,591 


Total Abated 


No. 


Issued 


2,593 


Total Tax 


No. 


Granted 


1,117 


Total Abated 


No. 


Issued 


18 


Total Tax 


No. 


Granted 


40 


Total Abated 


No. 


Issued 


9,921 


Total Tax 


No. 


Issued 


1 


Total Tax 


8340 






No. 


Issued 


586 


Total Tax 


No. 


Granted 


7 


Total Abated 


No. 


Granted 


3 


Total Abated 


No. 


Granted 


7 


Total Abated 


No. 


Granted 


2 


Total Abated 



almost $778,000 in state aid this past year but the propos 
ed freeze in local aid funds makes it unlikely that such 
assistance will help the town hold its property taxes level 
in fiscal 1981. 

Building permit activity increased by 55% over 1978 
with 591 permits issued. This would seem to reflect the 
current state of the economy with people adding on to ex- 
isting houses rather than purchasing new ones and paying 
higher mortgage rates. There was also a surge in the 
number of permits for wood stoves. A breakdown in 
eludes: 116 new dwellings; 101 condominiums; 36 com 
mercial, 20 signs; 149 additions; 13 sheds; 117 stoves; 33 
pools, 6 to remodel; and 4 Town of Chelmsford. 

In addition to checking out each permit, the Board 
continues visiting properties to update data and this year 
viewed all of the swimming pools in town in order to ad 
just their valuations. This spring a survey is planned of 
business properties. 

Of the total budget of $25,684,536 which includes 
town meeting appropriations, county assessments and 
local expenditures, $15,153,215 was raised by taxation or 
58%, down from 66.5% last year. Another $1,346,683 
came from motor vehicle excise, $1,635,511 from local 
receipts and $6,777,841 from the state. 



$1,733,158.97 

157,700.40 

73.166.30 

32,584.14 

473.59 

2,338.92 

14.584,083.94 

1,934.50 

569,131.80 

776.15 

102.80 

399.85 

42.50 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



STATUTORY EXEMPTIONS 



TYPE 




NO. 


TOTAL ABATED 


Clause 41 (Elderly 




212 


$104,205.90 


Clause 22 (Veterans) 




521 


94,576.50 


Clause 37 (Blind) 




14 


6.125.00 


Clause 17, 18 (Age Infirmity, 






Financial Condition) 




67 


18,865.21 


Clause 41 A Tax Deferrals 




8 


8,587.80 


R.E. Abatements (over val 


lue, 






erroneous, etc.) 




106 


22,271.98 



Members 

Gerald L. Hardy, Chairman 
Arthur J. Colmer 
Everett V. Olsen 



Cemetery Superintendent 
George E. Baxendale 



The Cemetery Commission of the Town of Chelmsford 
is pleased to report on some of their accomplishments 
during the year, 1979. 

One of our projects that everyone has been anxious to 
see completed has been the large hole on the left of the 
drive in Pine Ridge Cemetery. We now have most of that 
filled and hope to loam it over in the spring. We can then 
seed it and get ready for the sale of lots in that area. 

The cemetery employees together with the Youth 
Corps workers have scraped and painted sections of 
wrought-iron fence in Pine Ridge Cemetery, and all 
fences in the other cemeteries have been painted and kept 
in repair. 



58 



All cemeteries were limed and beautified, and the grass 
and shrubs were kept cut and trimmed. 

Foundations were put in for all those who wanted 
monuments on their lots. 

In 1979. there were 101 interments in the Chelmsford 
Cemeteries: Pine Ridge - 61, Fairview - 19, West Chelms 
ford 8, Riverside - 3, Forefathers - 2, and Heart Pond 
-8. Sixty-eight lots were sold this past year. 

With the hot topping of the roads in Riverside Ceme- 
tery in the spring of 1980, all roads in the Chelmsford 
Cemeteries will be completed. 

The Cemetery Commissioners, Superintendent and 
staff wish to thank all other departments, officials and 
employees for their cooperation during the year, 1979. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gerald L. Hardy, Chairman 

Arthur J. Colmer 

Everett V. Olsen 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Paul J. Canniff D.D.S., Chairman 
Peter Dulchinos Paul McCarthy 

Health Department Personnel 
Director of Public Health Health Inspector 

Thomas W. Morris, R.S. John P. Emerson Jr. 

Secretary 
Kathleen E. Jones 

Town Nurse Board of Health Physician 

Linda Lawlor RN B.S. Michael A. Gilchrist M.D. 

Water Pollution Control 

In 1979 the water pollution control program continued 
its effort to clean up the streams. The Board of Health 
made 11 Court appearances relative to violations. The 
Board performed 41 dye tests. Septic system permits 
issued (new) 134, septic system permits issued (repairs) 
108. Four inspections were made of Nursing Homes. 
Twenty-two inspections made for Article 2 Housing. 
School inspections 15. Complaints received and checked, 
250. Stable inspections 15. Camp Paul inspected 4 times. 
Bathing Beaches, 22 inspections. Certify International 
Travel Vaccination Books 53. Restaurants inspections, 
118. Tests for coliform contents 85. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 



Percolation test — 164 
Sewage permits — 242 
Miscellaneous licenses & fees 



$2,460.00 
$2,420.00 
$ 870.00 



Due to a mandate of a special town meeting the Board 
of Health caused the Town to be sprayed by aerial ap- 
plication to rid the Town of mosquitos. 



Aerial Spraying 



Rabies Clinic 



$8,000.00 



Public Health 

Communicable Disease Program 

Part of the duties of the Public Health Nurse include 
follow-up on certain reportable diseases as mandated by 
the Ma. Department of Public Health. An epidemio- 
logical investigation is undertaken by the Town Nurse 
and the report is submitted to Department of Public 
Health. Reports on the following diseases were completed 
during 1979. 



Tuberculosis 

Hepatitis 

Shigella 

Pertussis 

Salmonella 

Rubella 

Meningitis 



2 active cases 

4 reports 

1 report 

1 report 

8 reports 

2 reports 

1 report 



Administered by Martin Gruber, D.V.M., a total of 
243 dogs were inoculated against rabies. 



The testing of persons exposed to active tuberculosis 
and those persons whose employment require certifica- 
tion of freedom from that disease is another responsibility 
of the Town Nurse. Two hundred tests were given to the 
Town residents. Home visits are made to families with ac- 
tive tuberculosis on a periodic basis to insure understan- 
ding of the illness and that adequate medical follow-up is 
achieved. 

Maternal Child Health Services 

Home visits are made to families with newborns and 
premature infants by physician referral. Visits are made 
for health supervision, education and referral when in- 
dicated. There were twenty visits made to families under 
this program, and referrals were made to Crippled 
Children's Program, Headstart, Solomon Mental Health 
and Congenital Anomalies Clinic. 

Immunization Program (Preschool) 

The Board of Health offered 3 immunization clinics 
this year. There were twenty preschool children immuniz 
ed. 

Immunization Program 

The" Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics this 
year. The vaccine was offered to the elderly and 
chronically ill persons as recommended by the Ma. 
Department of Public Health. Four hundred persons 
were immunized with flu shots. Sixty persons were im- 
munized with the pneumonia shot. 

Hypertension Program Screening 

Two screening clinics were held in May to observe Na- 
tional Blood Pressure month. Sixty-five persons were 
screened at these clinics. 

Immunization Program (School) 

The Board of Health worked with the school nurses in 
implementing an immunization program for school aged 
children. Booster immunizations were offered to all 
students in accordance with public health law. 

Respectfully yours, 

Paul J. Canniff D.D.S. 
Chairman 



59 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority's principal work 
during the past year has been centered around the rehab- 
ilitation of the McFarlin School "B" building for use as 
elderly housing. The Special Town Meeting of February 
1st transferred the site and the building to the Housing 
Authority. This allowed us to successfully complete Phase 
I (Planning) and to obtain the necessary funding for 
Phase II (Development). We have now completed the 
drawings and specifications and look forward to going 
out for bids early in the new year. Present plans include 
four congregate units which will be an innovative ap- 
proach to elderly housing in our Town. 

We continue to manage three other on-going pro- 
grams: Chelmsford Arms, the Community Residence in 
North Chelmsford and the Chapter 707 "Scattered Site" 
program, and to search for additional funding to expand 
the number of units available in Chelmsford. These pro- 
grams combined with the McFarlin project will provide 
one hundred thirty-one units of State Aided Low Cost 
housing. 

Our second application to HUD for Section 8 federal 
funds was successful and we now have forty units 
authorized under this program, bringing our total 
number of units of low-income housing in Chelmsford to 
one hundred seventy-one. A third application was made 
this year for twenty-five more units under the Section 8 
program. Progress in these diversified areas is necessary 
to achieve our goal of providing low-income housing for 
families and the elderly. 

Changes during the year include: (a) the resignation of 
Robert A. Sheridan and the appointment of Claude A. 
Harvey to fill this vacancy; (b) the increased work load of 
the Development Phase of the McFarlin School project 
resulted in the approval of the Executive Offices of Com- 
munities and Development for a full-time Executive 
Director. William P. Keohane was selected to fill this 
position. 

We would like to thank the residents of the Town and 
the Town Officials for their continued support and 
cooperation. Our meetings are held in the Community 
Building at Chelmsford Arms, 1 Smith Street, at 7:30 pm 
on the first Tuesday of each month. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 

Claude A. Harvey 

Robert Hughes 

Richard L. Monahan 

Pamela Turnbull 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 



Library Trustees 

Dennis McHugh, Chairman Roger Welch 

Howard K. Moore Brenda McDermott 

Elizabeth McCarthy James Cooper 

The Chelmsford Public Library is a money-saving in- 
stitution and a very good investment. When 30 or 40 peo- 
ple use the same book, record, film, art print, reference 
book, magazine, etc. the savings are spectacular. The 
savings come from the single fact that materials and ser- 
vices provided by your public library are shared by many 
people. If our borrowers had to purchase the materials 
and services they received free from us, in 1979 they 
would have spent over 3 million dollars. 

You borrowed 221,894 books. Buying 
them at the average price ($13.40) you 
would have spent at least $2,973,379.60 

We circulated 19,355 magazines. You 
could have paid $1.50 or more each for 
them, but we saved you 29,032.50 

You checked out 25,146 records at a sav- 
ings of 125,730.00 

We secured 264 interlibrary loans for you. 
Some of these were not available elsewhere 
for any price 3,537.60 

523 framed art prints were circulated. 

Value 23,535.00 

We answered 7018 reference and research 

questions, saving you 14,036.00 

By circulating our video equipment 104 
times, we saved you (at $90. a day for an 
average of 3 days) 28,080.00 

You borrowed 2313 8mm films and saved . 15,034.50 



We presented programs to various groups 
with a total attendance of 3,005. Value . . . 



6,010.00 



We presented story hours to 1,597 young- 
sters for a savings of 1,197.75 

for a total of $3,219,572.90 

All of these services cost the people of 

Chelmsford 278,740.00 

SAVINGS $2,940,832.90 

Major accomplishments in 1979 included the winning 
of two state-wide library awards — one for a public rela- 
tions effort and the other, a library of the year award for 
"unique use of two private buildings to provide space for 
library activities", referring to the Children's House and 
the Carriage House. With the addition of a microfiche 
reader/printer and 33 magazine titles on microfiche, the 
library is better able to serve the report and research ac- 
tivities of its patrons. The other major thrust of library 
activity during 1979 was an active involvement with the 



60 



community which included concerts, instruction in the 
use of video equipment, and increased programming for 
children. 

Whereas space for library programming is limited at 
present, the Carriage House, when renovated, will pro- 
vide ample space for both library programs and com- 
munity meetings. In addition to space for programming, 
there is an immediate need for shelving to hold 5,500 
volumes which is projected to be sufficient for the next 
five years. 

The library continued the trend of increased circula- 
tion with an annual growth of 3% in 1979. In conclusion 
I would like to acknowledge the continuing support of the 
community including library users, volunteers, Friends of 
the Library, staff and trustees. 



$17,041.53 

269,700 

2,494 

18 

26 



Statistical Report 

Monies deposited with the Town Treasurer 

(fines and state aid) 
Circulation 
Cards issued 

Employees (full time including CETA) 
Employees (part time including NYC) 
Assistant Director: William F. Edge, Jr. 
Department Heads: 

Goldie Creamer (MacKay Branch) 

Lillian Storey (Circulation) 

Bea Beaubien (Children's House) 

Linda Webb (Fine Arts) 

Joan Allard (Reference) 

Marion Lord (Technical Services) 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Ann E. Gallmeyer 
Director 

PARK COMMISSION 

Park Superintendent — Donald P. Gray 

The Park Commissioners elected Arthur L. Bennett as 
Chairman at the annual organizational meeting. 

Robert W. Wetmore was elected to the Commission 
and Eileen M. Duffy was appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen to finish the term of Joan Schenk who resign 
ed. 

A new lawn tractor was purchased by the voters for the 
department. 

Two fifteen foot Spruce trees were planted in the 
Center Common this year. These were donated to the 
town by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Trainor of 17 Norman 
Smith Street. 

Chelmsford Landscaping donated a Spruce tree which 
was planted in the triangle in Central Square. 

The Park Department continues to maintain the 
Recreation areas, ball fields, ice skating at Roberts Field, 
and the Tot Lot. 



All soccer fields were limed and fertilized. 

The Park Commission is grateful to all Town Depart 
ments and Garden Clubs for their continued co operation 
and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur L. Bennett, Chairman 

Robert W. Wetmore 

Eileen M. Duffy 



CHELMSFORD PLANNING BOARD 

1979 

Henrick R.Johnson, Jr., Chairman Paul F. Bartel 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman Charles A. Parlee 
Ann H. McCarthy, Clerk Rosalind M. Boyle 

Eugene E. Gilet Jacqueline A. Sheehy, Recording Clerk 

During 1979, the Planning Board has continued its ef 
forts to revise and update a new street and zoning map to 
present to the townspeople of Chelmsford at the 1980 An- 
nual Town Meeting. 

Under the Subdivision Control Law, the Board approv- 
ed, after careful consideration, eight new subdivisions 
9 lots at Roy Clough Lane off Golden Cove Road, 17 lots 
at Tanglewood Estates off Locke Road, 8 lots at Boyd 
Lane off Golden Cove Road, 6 lots at Loiselle Lane off 
Main Street, 3 lots at Elizabeth Drive off Mill Road, 3 lots 
at Courthouse Lane off Parkhurst Road and 2 lots on 
Dulgarian Terrace and Adirondack Lane. The Board 
also approved thirty-two plans under Subdivision Control 
Law Not Required. 

The Board reviewed and approved eleven plans under 
Site Plan Review which requires that any building con 
taining over 3,000 square feet must be approved by the 
Planning Board. Among the plans reviewed, two 
building additions, one for Optronics, Inc. on Stuart 
Road and one for Stickney & Poor Spice Company on 
Alpha Rd., were approved and also several new 
buildings, including a drive-up teller facility at Central 
Savings Bank on the Emerson property off North Road, 
two multi-tenant buildings off Mill Road, a new Raquet- 
ball Club off Parkhurst Road, an industrial building on 
Progress Avenue, a garage for trucks and storage off Old 
Billerica Road, a welding shop on Middlesex St., parking 
lot improvements at St. Vartanantz Church, a new retail 
and wholesale farm store off Parkhurst Road, and 
seventy-two condominium units by Robert Hicks off 
Richardson Rd. 

Mrs. Carolyn Fenn, who decided not to seek re-election 
to the Board, was replaced by Mrs. Rosalind M. Boyle, 
who was elected to a three year term in April. Henrick R. 
Johnson, Jr. and Charles Parlee were also elected to serve 
three year terms. The Board re-organized and elected 
Mr. Johnson as Chairman, Mr. Thomas Firth as Vice 
Chairman, Mrs. Ann McCarthy as Clerk, Mr. Eugene 
Gilet as representative to the Northern Middlesex Area 
Planning Commission, and Mr. Paul Bartel as represen- 



61 



tative to Capital Planning and Budgeting and also the 
Vinal Square Development Project Committee. Mrs. 
Judith Carter resigned as Recording Clerk and was 
replaced by Mrs. Jacqueline Sheehy. 

During the past year, the Planning Board has had 
meetings with the Conservation Commission and Fire 
Department in an endeavor to create a more cooperative 
spirit of effort to facilitate the review of subdivision and 
site plans. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Chairman 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Edward H. Hilliard, Chairman 

Carl A. Olsson Herbert F. Bennett 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Ex-Officio 

Voting Strength as of December 31, 1979 

PREC DEM REP IND TOTAL 

1 433 

2 464 

3 659 

4 357 

5 507 

6 554 

7 368 

8 351 

9 399 

10 598 

11 426 

12 526 229 828 1583 
TOTL 5642 2724 7829 16195 



327 


689 


1449 


182 


430 


1076 


236 


919 


1814 


88 


229 


674 


326 


1040 


1873 


252 


646 


1452 


218 


543 


1129 


251 


576 


1178 


133 


556 


1088 


257 


939 


1794 


225 


434 


1085 



62 




John W. Peters, Vice-Chairman 
Carol C. Cleven, Secretary 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Stan Norkunas, Chairman 



Daniel D. Doolan, Student Member 
Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent 

THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1979 



MyraJ. Silver 
Kenneth C. Taylor 



Years 

1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979-80 



Teachers 

548 
553 
565 
550 
539 
526 



Non-Teachers 1 


Budget* 


324 


10,660,533 


331 


11,719,467 


336 


12,348,725 


298 


13,024,958 


273 


13,270,419 


273 


14,435,848 



"Includes Part Time Personnel 
includes Federal Funds 
3 Not Finalized until 6/30/80 



Expenditures 


Enrollment 


10,532,793. 


9,627 


11,719,112. 


9,555 


12,337,877. 


9,311 


13,008,530. 


8,936 


13,716,642. 


8,395 


3 


7,940 



The 1979 school year was a challenging, productive 
one for the Chelmsford Public Schools. The accomplish- 
ments were diverse, some large and some small, some just 
beginning steps on large projects. But all were exciting 
and attest to the vitality of the school system. 

The on-going accumulation of knowledge and the 
changing nature of scholarly interpretation were 
recognized by a dynamic Chelmsford staff which par- 
ticipated in curriculum review and development, and 
which also continued its own study in college or in 
specially designed, in-service courses and workshops. 

The test of a school system is whether students learn, 
and whether the parents and the community are happy 



with their schools. Test scores can give comparisons. 
Grades can be analyzed. But education is a personal 
thing. Informal surveys show the satisfaction of pupils 
and parents with their schools. However, neither the 
schools nor the community can be satisfied with past per- 
formance. Both must work for better communications, 
better understanding, and even higher levels of expecta- 
tion. It is important that citizens participate actively in 
school issues and express their concerns to the School 
Committee in order to ensure the best decisions possible 
for the education of the young people of Chelmsford. The 
school system welcomes suggestions from any and all in- 
dividuals. A number of citizen advisory committees con- 
tinued their valuable association with the school system. 
They were: Citizens Advisory Committees for — (1) 



63 



Declining Enrollment and Its Effect upon the School 
System — (2) Basic Skills Improvement and Competency 
Testing — (3) School Budget — (4) Adult Evening Educa- 
tion— (5) Distributive Education — (6) Townwide Pedes- 
trian/Traffic Safety Committee. Not to be overlooked are 
organizations as the P.T.O., the Boosters, the Friends of 
Music, and other civic organizations whose many contri- 
butions to the community are extremely valuable and 
significant. 

The recommendations of these advisory committees 
are evaluated by staff and administrators who use them to 
develop their reports and recommendations to the School 
Committee. In view of the projected decline in school 



enrollment, the School Committee is currently studying 
several recommendations for restructuring the school sys- 
tem's grade and administrative-supervisory organizations 
including an implementation schedule. 

During the past five years, the school population 
(K-12) has decreased from 9,627 (1974 to the current 
enrollment of 7,940, a decline of 1,687 students. 

The enrollment projections, which are calculated using 
the latest birth and enrollment formula consistently ap 
plied since 1970, proved again to closely coincide with ac 
tual school enrollments. The summary follows: 



Grade 



Projected 
1979 



Actual 
1979 



1980 



Revised Projections for 1980-84 
1981 1982 1983 1984 



K 

1-6 

7-9 

10-12 

Sp. CI. 

Total 



365 

3394 

2044 

2087 

65 

7955 



365 

3381 

2028 

2080 

86 

7940 



360 


342 


325 


3102 


2758 


2469 


1889 


1873 


1831 


2006 


1910 


1795 


90 


95 


100 



328 
2230 
1757 
1672 

100 



7447 6978 6520 6087 



300 
2102 
1520 
1658 

100 

5680 



School 



Chelmsford's official enrollment of 7,940 students for 
the current school year (1979-80) represents a decline of 
455 students or 5.4% from the 1978-79 enrollment of 
8,395. 

The specific enrollment figures for all schools by grade 
level is depicted below: 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 
Gr. 1 Gr. 2 Gr. 3 Gr. 4 Gr. 5 Gr. 6 Gr. 7 Gr. 8 Gr. 9 Gr. 10 Gr. 11 Gr. 12 Sp.Cl. Total 



Bvam 


60 


80 


77 


88 


93 


119 


113 














4 


639 


Center 


49 


47 


63 


64 


93 


95 


104 














22 


537 


Harrington 


66 


49 


85 


99 


104 


178 


108 
















689 


North 


77 


86 


91 


116 


117 


81 


















568 


South Row 


42 


52 


40 


74 


89 


102 


82 














20 


501 


Westlands 


71 


95 


110 


129 


124 


120 


102 
















751 


Parker 














107 


304 


323 


312 








20 


1066 


McCarthy 
















351 


377 


361 










1089 


High School 






















698 


695 


687 


20 


2100 


Totals 


365 


409 


466 


570 


625 


695 


616 


655 


700 


673 


698 


695 


687 


86 


7940 



The Chelmsford Public Schools have been responsive 
to the needs of students while being sensitive to communi- 
ty needs and problems. Demands upon the staff increase 
progressively. It is axiomatic that planning teaching 
strategies and materials to permit students to progress ac- 
cording to their needs is no easy task. Planning for and 
teaching individual students requires a commitment of 
effort and learning far in excess of the normal school day. 
But learning is the primary function of the school, not 
teaching. The following reports received from school per- 
sonnel will aid readers of this report to better understand 
some of the learning experiences children are having in 
our schools today. 

FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Chelmsford High School traditionally is in the 
forefront of academic, athletic and extra-curricular ex- 
periences throughout the state. 



An example of the meritorious achievements gained by 
students is the proud history of the Chelmsford High 
School Math Team. In competition with schools in the 
Merrimack Valley and throughout the state, Chelmsford 
has amassed the following honors: first place in the Mer- 
rimack Valley for the seventh consecutive year, third 
place in Eastern Massachusetts, fourth place in All-State 
Competition, third place in the New England Tourna- 
ment and tenth place in the National Math Contest. This 
type of accomplishment has become an annual litany of 
awards won by the Math Team. 

These accomplishments highlight an impressive record 
of achievement in all academic areas. The Class of 1979 
had six Finalists and sixteen Letters of Commendation in 
the National Merit Exam. 

The academic achievements were highlighted further 
by the fact that over $30,000 in scholarships were award- 



64 



ed to members of the Class of 1979, exclusive of monies 
awarded by the universities to individual students. 

In recognition of the outstanding academic record of 
our students the Chelmsford High School Faculty 
Association instituted Awards for Academic Excellence in 
each subject area which are presented to seniors at an 
Awards Night ceremony. 

Every effort is being made to sustain and to improve on 
an already challenging curriculum. This year additional 
Honors and Advanced Placement courses were added in 
English, Foreign Languages and Social Studies. 

The teaching staff has also won honors and distinctions 
for their work in curriculum development. Members of 
our staff played leading roles at a convention in San Fran- 
cisco where a team of our Social Studies teachers made a 
presentation of a model American Studies unit and 
another teacher presented a paper on Technical Writing. 

The student body at Chelmsford High School con- 
tinues to be diverse. In addition to servicing the 2100 
students from Chelmsford, we are proud this year to host 
American Field Service students from Finland and 
Switzerland, and, for the next two years, two young men 
from Peking, China will be educated at Chelmsford High 
School. 

The broad-based extra-curricula program has produc- 
ed many and varied honors for Chelmsford High School. 
For the third consecutive year the student body has been 
honored by the Nathan W. Aldrich School Appreciation 
Award for the highest standards of sportsmanship and 
character. The boys' Tennis team emerged as Merrimack 
Valley Champs, the Winter Track team won the Division 
I State Championship and the boys repeated as State 
Decathalon Champs. The girls' Volleyball Team went 
undefeated and won the Merrimack Valley Conference 
Championship. 

The extra -curricula awards were not reserved for 
athletics alone. The Jazz Ensemble won a coveted State 
Championship, and the Orchestra won a State Class B 
Championship. 

As always, the Drama Club presented an outstanding 
musical, winning rave notices for its production of 
Oliver. 

Few accomplishments can better describe the spirit, 
enthusiasm, character and sense of community of our stu- 
dent body than the fact that this year we passed the 
1,000-pint mark in our annual Red Cross Blood Drive. 
This represents a great achievement in the six-year pro- 
gram and is a true testament to the fine young adults in 
Chelmsford. 

FROM THE MCCARTHY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 
BUILDING MASTER 

This is the 2nd year of McCarthy Junior High School's 
House plan. The "Red" House includes the math, 
science, home economics, industrial arts, music, art, 
physical education and special education departments, 



located on the first floor. The "White" House includes 
the foreign language, English, social studies, reading and 
library departments located on the second floor. 

As a result of the "House" plan and a closer relation- 
ship between the administrators, teachers, students and 
parents, we have been successful in assisting students in 
assuming their responsibilities. In this, the "International 
Year of the Child", a more concerted effort has been 
made to meet the needs of all our students. This has been 
evidenced by: 

1 . High student and staff morale 

2. Over 300 students in musical performing groups 

3. More than 400 students involved in intramural 
athletics 

4. Highly successful charity drives for needy members 
of our community 

5. Active participation in extra-curricula activities 

6. Excellent achievement test scores as reported by 
S.R.A. exams 

7. A drop in truancy, smoking and discipline pro- 
blems 

8. A highly successful student store has been instituted 

9. A series of monthly informational programs have 
been conducted dealing with topics such as: 
"The Role of the Guidance Counselor", "Home- 
work and Study Habits", "9th Grade Electives" and 
"Nashoba Valley Technical H.S." 

To promote communication between/among all the 
members of the McCarthy Junior High School communi- 
ty, three basic advisory committees have been opera- 
tional: 

1. Faculty Senate — Teacher and Administrator 

2. McCarthy Advisory Council (MAC) — Parent and 
Teacher 

3. Student Council 



FROM THE PARKER JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 



and 



The Parker Junior High School continues to work 
towards its philosophy of making it possible for boy; 
girls to develop mentally, physically, emotionally, 
socially in order that they may become responsible 
contributing members of a democratic society. 

The goals towards these ends are established through a 
progam of adjustment which brings about a gradual 
change from elementary to secondary education, a pupil 
guidance program which helps students to select courses 
each year which are most desirable and suitable, and an 
enriched and varied program of studies which provides a 
wide selection of subject matter and activities to meet the 
individual differences in interests, aptitudes and abilities 
of each child assigned to the Parker Junior High School. 

The staff and administration are constantly reviewing 
and evaluating the present curriculum to see that changes 
are instituted that will permit each student to fulfill the 
goals and philosophy of the Parker Junior High School. 



65 



FROM THE CENTER SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

1979, "The International Year of the Child" was an ex- 
citing and productive year at the Center School. 

Staff efforts in planning and providing for the 
multiplicity of social, emotional, as well as, academic 
needs have resulted in conspicuous student growth. Effec- 
tive mainstreaming and our child support groups have 
enabled us to focus on strategies which enhance pupil 
progress. 

Professional staff are benefitting from the five (5) inser- 
vice courses which are sponsored by the Chelmsford 
Public Schools. The initial first aid training session for 
teacher aides was also successful. 

Participation in our upper grades after school intra- 
mural sports program is maintained at a high level. 
Forty-five (45) boys and girls earned "Youth Fitness 
Awards." An equally high percentage of students attend- 
ed the Youth Symphony Concerts in Boston. 

Parent support as resource persons, field trip 
chaperones, room mothers, kindergarten and library 
assistants have been a continuous source of encourage- 
ment as well as help to our staff. 

The contributions of our active Parent-Teachers 
Organization have been numerous. Outdoor education 
scholarships, monies for classroom games, and a one- 
thousand dollar budget item for field trips are just some 
indications of the type of assistance this group has provid- 
ed. 

As a New Year begins, we are optimistic that four pro- 
jects will be culminated in 1980. 1) Career Day to in- 
crease Career Awareness among our seven-eleven year 
olds; 2) Senior citizen volunteer program; 3) A unique 
three-day Environmental Educational Experience, and 4) 
a film and discussion program designated to assist parents 
in their child rearing responsibilities. 

FROM THE SOUTH ROW SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

The student in South Row School is considered an in- 
dividual and a member of various groups in order to help 
him work toward his fullest potential academically and 
socially. 

The school is organized as a modified self contained 
school. Each child is placed in a heterogeneously grouped 
classroom at his grade level. He has the opportunity to 
identify strongly with one adult and his peers in such a 
setting. 



Within the classroom the child is placed homogeneous- 
ly in a reading group. Each classroom has either three or 
four reading groups performing at various levels. When 
appropriate, children change reading groups even if it 
means reading with a group in another classroom. 
Reading is considered to be the most important educa- 
tional tool taught in the school. Children are grouped 
homogeneously for math instruction and often have 
another teacher for math. 

Teachers provide group instruction for students in a 
variety of subject areas with attention to obvious in- 
dividual needs. Teachers provide varied opportunities for 
creative activities and projects to supplement prescribed 
curriculum. Classrooms contain a variety of learning 
centers that are used to encourage the child to develop 
skills and special interests. 

Art, music, and physical education are taught by 
specialists. These areas are coordinated by the specialists 
and classroom teachers so that true inter-disciplinary 
learning experiences take place. 

Individual attention is given to each child by his 
teachers in skills where he needs extra help. Should he re- 
quire help for a special need, various specialists are 
available, and his schedule is arranged to meet his needs. 

Teachers at South Row are acutely aware of the variety 
of individual needs of students. South Row School is uni- 
que in that it services the needs of special children 
throughout the town with its three special needs class- 
rooms and with its programs for integrating students with 
special needs. 

Among the staff there is considerable consultation 
within grade levels and across grade level lines which at- 
tempts to establish a spirit of unity throughout South 
Row. 

In an effort to match learning and teaching styles in a 
more precise manner an alternative education program 
has been developed for grades one through six. On the 
basis of parent recommendation and on the staffs judg- 
ment a child is placed into an appropriate learning style. 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF GUIDANCE 

The following are pertinent facts and figures for the 
Class of 1979; also included are Chelmsford High School 
and Nashoba Tech statistics for an overview of Chelms- 
ford public school graduates. 



1976 



1977 



1978 



1979 



Number of Graduation Students 

Four-Year Colleges 

Two- Year Colleges 

Tech Specialized, Plus Nursing 

Total Post-Secondary 

Employment 

Undecided 

Military 

Marriage 



603 




609 




685 




611 




319 


53% 


308 


50.6% 


375 


54.7% 


351 


57.5% 


68 


11% 


93 


15.2% 


79 


11.5% 


69 


11.3% 


38 


7% 


38 


6.2% 


30 


4.3% 


32 


5.2% 


425 


71% 


439 


72% 


484 


70.6% 


452 


74% 


127 


21% 


151 


24.6% 


178 


26% 


139 


22.7% 


34 


4.7% 


7 


1.6% 


11 


1.6% 


3 


•4% 


15 


• 3% 


10 


1.5% 


12 


1.7% 


16 


2.6% 


2 


.03% 


2 


.03% 






1 





66 



Highlights 

57.5 of the CHS graduates planned to attend Four- 
Year colleges. 

74% of the 1979 graduates plan to continue their 
education beyond high school. 

One hundred and thirty nine students entered the 
labor market. 

There were two students in the top 65 (10%) who opted 
to seek employment. 

Thirty-four of the top 65 plan to enter science related 
careers. 

Four indicated they would pursue a Liberal Arts pro- 
gram. 

The number one student, Lois Leach, was accepted in 
the Pennsylvania State University Five-Year Cooperative 
Program in Medicine; she has successfully completed her 
first summer and fall terms. 

TOP SIXTY-FIVE STUDENTS— CLASS OF 1979 



61. U. of Lowell 

62. Emmanuel College 

63. U. of Lowell 

64. U. of New Hampshire 

65. U. of Massachusetts 



Bus/ Accounting 

Music Ed/Music Therapy 

Business 

Undecided 

Pre-Medical 



Transcripts processed for the Class of 1979 totaled 
2630; this represents an average of 5.8 per student plann- 
ing to attend college. Sixteen boys and nine girls 
dropped-out during the school year. Additionally, 
twenty-eight did not graduate because of insufficient 
credits. Eleven at this writing have since completed the 
requirements for their diploma. Another four have re- 
entered. 



ALL CHELMSFORD PUBLIC SECONDARY 

STUDENTS, CHELMSFORD HIGH AND 

NASHOBA REGIONAL TECHNICAL 

HIGH SCHOOL 



1. 


Penn State University 


Pre-Medical 


2. 


Smith College 


Undecided 


3. 


Dartmouth College 


Environmental Engineering 


4. 


Mt. Holyoke College 


Liberal Arts 


5. 


U. of Vermont 


Chemical Engineering 


6. 


Worcester Polytechnic Inst. 


Electronics Engineering 


7. 


Harvard University 


Chem/Bio 


8. 


Renssalear Polytechnic Inst. 


Engineering 


9. 


U. of Lowell 


Engineering 


10. 


U. of Lowell 


Chemistry 


11. 


Wake Forest University 


Bus/ Accounting 


12. 


College of the Holy Cross 


History/ Pre- Legal 


13. 


Ball State University 


Mathematics 


14. 


Wesleyan University 


Chemistry 


15. 


U.S. Coast Guard Academy 


Marine Sci/Engineering 


16. 


U. of Massachusetts 


Liberal Arts 


17. 


Ohio State University 


Biology 


18. 


Wellesley College 


Economics 


19. 


U. of Lowell 


Math/Computer Science 


20. 


U. of Lowell 


Mathematics 


21. 


Stanford University 


Liberal Arts 


22. 


Mt. Holyoke College 


Biology 


23. 


U. of Miami 


Marine Science 


24. 


Philadelphia College of Art 


Illustrating 


25. 


Hamilton College 


Government/Political Science 


26. 


U. of New Hampshire 


Engineering 


27. 


Smith College 


Biology 


28. 


Cornell University 


Industrial Engineering 


29. 


U. of Michigan 


Chemistry 


30. 


U. of New Hampshire 


Liberal Arts 


31. 


U. of Massachusetts 


Bio/Medical Engineering 


32. 


Employment 




33. 


U. of Pennsylvania 


Business 


34. 


Mt. Holyoke College 


Biology 


35. 


U. of Virginia 


Architecture 


36. 


St. Michael's, VT 


Journalism 


37. 


Duke University 


Political Science 


38. 


U. of Kentucky 


Pre-Vet Medicine 


39. 


U. of Massachusetts 


Engineering 


40. 


U. of Massachusetts 


Journalism 


41. 


U. of Lowell 


Medical Technical 


42. 


Tufts University 


Engineering 


43. 


Villanova University 


Chemical Engineering 


44. 


Employment 




45. 


Northeastern University 


Journalism 


46. 


Bates College 


Pre-Medical 


47. 


U. of New Hampshire 


Health Planning 


48. 


U. of Rochester 


Optics 


49. 


Employment 




50. 


Wesleyan University 


English/Psychology 


51. 


Berklee College of Music 


Music 


52. 


Worcester Polytechnic Institute 


Elect. Eng. or Comp. Science 


53. 


U. of Massachusetts 


Physics 


54. 


Syracuse University 


Electrical Engineering 


55. 


Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. 


Engineering 


56. 


Providence College 


Business Management 


57. 


U. of Massachusetts 


Environmental Design 


58. 


U. of Massachusetts 


Physics 


59. 


Union College 


Electrical Engineering 


60. 


U. of New Hampshjire 


Undecided 



Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba Tech (Chelmsford Srs.) 



Percentages 

Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba Tech (Chelmsford Srs.) 



Total Post- 
Secondary 
452 

6 



Total (employment. 
Others (military, etc.) 
159 = 611 

51 = 57 



458 



74.0 
10.5 



210 



26.0 
89.5 



668 



Combined -67% 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT RESULTS: 



Summary of Colleges 



# of Reports 
1 
3 



30 Candidates took 39 Exams - 
receiving AP results is as follows: 



Hamilton College 
University of Lowell 
Tufts University 
Rensselaer Poly Institute 
Suffolk University 
Smith College 
Clark University 
Wesleyan University 
Univ. of Michigan Arbor 
Duke University 
Univ. of Chicago 
College of the Holy Cross 
Univ. of Mass-Amherst 
Mount Holyoke College 
Cornell University 
Union College 

Pennsylvania State Univesity 
Dartmouth College 
University of Vermont 
Worcester Poly Institute 
Mass. Inst, of Technology 
Syracuse University 
Northeastern University 



Scores are reported on a scale of 1-5 with 5 being the 
highest. Depending on the college and program, credit is 
usually granted for 3's and higher; occasionally, 2's 
receive credit. 



67 



Scores are as follows: 



Low 



High 





Score Range 










Total 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


Scores 


•American History 




1 


2 


3 


1 


3 


10 


•Chemistry 










2 


3 


1 


6 


•French Language 




1 


2 


2 


2 


1 


8 


•Calc AB 










1 


2 


2 


5 


•Calc BC (Higher Level) 










3 





5 


8 


Physics 










1 








1 


Spanish 













1 





1 


Totals 




2 


4 


12 


9 


12 


39 




33 at 


or above 












College 


Credit 


Level 











•AP Course Offered 78 79 

WORK-STUDY 1978-79 

During the school year, eighty-eight students par- 
ticipated in the Work-Study Program for credit. As in the 
past, the majority of the participants were seniors. Many 
of the seniors in the program plan to further their educa- 
tion. 

Approximately thirty to thirty-five seniors plan to stay 
at their jobs following graduation. A few have shown at 
least a curiosity in military service, while a great many are 
predictably undecided about their immediate futures. 

During the school year, well over one hundred place- 
ments were made through the Work-Study Office. These 
were not placements for school credit, as many of them 
were of short duration. The majority of the counselor's 
time was spent visiting employers for student evaluations 
and job prospecting. 

Again, we welcomed the participation of the Chelms- 
ford Rotary Club. They invited interested students to 
spend a few hours with a Rotarian during his work day. 
They referred to this as a "vocational experience." 

I am deeply concerned that the program has been dis- 
continued for the next school year. Any program that 
serves a special need for such a cross section of our 
students certainly merits retention in a truly comprehen- 
sive high school. It is a program that benefits the student, 
the school, and employers in the community. Following is 
a list of the cooperation employers during the School 
Year 1978-70. 



Rte. 4 Chevron 

Bos'ns Whistle 

J.M. Fields 

Child World 

Medical Associates 

Feeney Florist 

Bradlee's 

SMR Co. 

Sears Roebuck 

Bell Co. Machine 

Cunningham Machine 

Marshall's 

Country View 

Kentucky Fried Chicken 

Exxon 

Atty. James Harrington 

Little Jack's 

R D Associates 



Alexanders 

United Auto 

Impex 

Stickney and Poor 

Five Seasons 

H. Goodwin. Inc. 

Oaken Bucket 

Polka Dot Junction 

Lukas Florist 

Li'l Peach 

No. American Video 

Demoulas' 

TES Inc 

Bennett's Green House 

Regal Business 

Gary's Ice Cream 

Crown Manor Realty 

Yvon Construction 



Carlisle Superette 
Frequency Sources 
Yum Yum Shop 
Impex Industries 
Hit or Miss 
Laughton's 
Hart's Farms 
Mello Autos 
Best Buy 
Japenamelac 
Alpine Lanes 
Spiro Eggs 
Marinel Transp. 
McDonald's 
Bobcat Division 
Billerica Forum 
Chandler Machine 
Supt. Office 
W T Tanner Co. 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF CAREER EDUCATION 

The Career Education Department of the Chelmsford 
School Department is composed of 31 teachers. The 
breakdown of these 31 teachers shows 19 working in four 
different curriculum areas in the high school. The re- 
mainder of the staff is employed in the junior high 
schools. These teachers have contact with 2,150 students 
daily, teaching 67 different courses. 

The success of the Career Education Department can 
be measured in many different ways. We would like to br- 
ing some of these successes to your attention. 

Teachers know their first responsibility is to prepare 
students for a successful future. In order to meet this 
goal, teachers are constantly attempting to bring to their 
students the latest in teaching methodologies. 

This last summer typing teachers at the high school 
had a three-day curriculum workshop. This curriculum 
workshop allowed our teachers to update their teaching 
syllabuses in Personal Typing Courses, also Typing 1, 2 
and 3 courses. Typing syllabuses now contain informa- 
tion on the new Olivetti Word Processing System. It 
might be interesting to know we have over 1,000 students 
taking typing courses in grades 10-12. 

The Business Education teachers and administrative 
personnel wrote and had funded another federal project. 
This project was entitled "Introduction to Computer 
Data-Based Accounting." With this project money 
($18,263) the Business Education Department will be 
changing part of the accounting courses to computer 
base. This new accounting program will allow the 
students to be better prepared to enter the working field 
of accounting or, if they decide on future education, to 
be better prepared for this task. 

The Business Education Department is not experienc- 
ing a decline in student enrollment. More than ever, 
Chelmsford High School students seem to be selecting 
courses within the Business Education Department. It is 
the teachers' opinion that students in our school system, 
now more than ever, are reinforcing their academic skills 
with some practical job skills. 

Distributive Education classes at the high school have 
shown over a 100% increase in enrollment. This pro- 
gram, exposing students to the fields of Marketing and 
Retailing, has increased from an enrollment of 18 
students in the 1977-78 school year to 52 students during 
this school year. 

The programs which are offered in the Home Econo- 
mics curriculum area are constantly being changed to 
better meet the needs of the students. To this goal, the 
Home Economics teachers have done the following: wrote 
and had funded a Federal Project for the junior high 
schools. The amount of the funding was $8,716.98. This 
project entitled "Consumer and Homemaking Program 
to Eliminate Sex Stereotyping," will help to compliment a 



68 



new curriculum in our Home Economics Departments. 
The new curriculum currently under study by the depart- 
ment will consider making Home Economics programs at 
the junior high school level required by all students. 

Programs in Industrial Arts at the junior high schools 
are also considering becoming part of this non-sex-stereo- 
typing program. To this goal the Industrial Arts teachers, 
along with the Home Economics teachers, are working 
together to come up with a curriculum program which 
they feel will be both exciting and rewarding to the 
students. 

The curriculum programs in Home Economics and In- 
dustrial Arts are in compliance with the state's anti- 
discrimination laws; namely, Chapter 622 and the federal 
law under Title IX. However, because of various sex- 
stereotyping pressures placed on students by their peers, 
teachers, guidance counselors and parents, both female 
and male students are not receiving an equal sex-stereo- 
typing free education in Home Economics and Industrial 
Arts. With all the career opportunities which are avail- 
able to both girls and boys in the decade of the 80's and 
beyond, teachers feel it is a paramount goal to be sure 
they do not attempt to influence students to occupational 
stereotyping of the past. 

The Chelmsford School Department is participating in 
a Career Education Program. This program will help 
every classroom teacher to be better prepared to bring 
career education topics into their teaching environments. 
This program entitled "Business-Labor-Education Col- 
laborative," is being operated by a collaborative of seven 
area towns. This collaborative is under the directorship of 
the Chamber of Commerce of Lowell and the Northern 
Middlesex Communities. 

The career program calls for six elementary teachers 
K-3, seven teachers grades 4-6, four teachers grades 7-9, 
and four teachers grades 10-12 to be trained as team 
leaders in career education. These team leaders will 
return to the schools showing their colleagues how to in- 
fuse career concepts in their daily lesson plans. Some of 
the topics these teachers will be introduced to will be: (1) 
Economic Awareness in Career Education, (2) Informa- 
tion and Resources to Integrate Career Education into 
the Classroom, and (3) Title IX and Chapter 622 laws. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

The junior high French curriculum entered its third 
year of the conversion to the new audio-lingual-visual 
program. This completes the conversion at this level and 
more closely approximates the approach taken in the 
Spanish curriculum. With this standardization of ap- 
proach, the department inaugurated departmental ex- 
ams at the 7th grade in order to monitor the learning out- 
comes of the programs. Ninety-three percent (93%) of 
the French students and ninety-seven percent (97%) of 
the Spanish students scored above the 50%. 

Foreign Languages at the junior high level continue to 
feel the impact of declining over-all enrollment. The 
department is meeting this challenge by emphasizing to 



students and parents alike the importance of beginning 
the study of a foreign language in the junior high. Brief- 
ly, the rationale is: 

1 . The earlier the start, the easier the mastery. In ear- 
ly adolescence, speech habits in the native language 
are not yet so engrained as to interfere seriously 
with the learning of new speech habits. At this age, 
students have natural ability to memorize, repro- 
duce unfamiliar sounds accurately, and acquire 
new structures automatically. 

2. The longer the exposure, the better the achieve- 
ment. Research indicates that students with a 
longer exposure to foreign language generally ac- 
quire better and more solid skills than those with a 
shorter exposure. 

3. Return to basics? Foreign Languages!! 
Research findings support the conclusion that 
foreign language study leads to the acquisition of 
skills transferable to other domains such as English 
vocabulary development, reading comprehension, 
and communication skills. 

At the high school, there was a slight increase in enroll- 
ment attributable probably to a number of students elec- 
ting to pursue a second language. Latin enrollments 
stabilized at 130 in three levels. We hope that as more 
freshmen become aware of the benefits of Latin that they 
will enter the program as sophomores, thereby streng- 
thening Level 3 enrollment. 

The French faculty continued its successful exchange 
program with a French lycee in Grasse, France, during 
January and April of 1979. Later last Spring, the School 
Committee endorsed the planning of a similar exchange 
with Venezuela for students of Spanish. 

The entire Foreign Language faculty remains enthusi- 
astically committed to its responsibility to prepare the 
youth of Chelmsford for its role in forging a better future 
for America. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 

The purpose of music education in the Chelmsford 
Public Schools is to assist students according to their in- 
dividual capacities in their appreciation and understan- 
ding of the aesthetic effect of music. 

The music department is committed to excellence in 
music at all levels and strives to help students discover 
and develop their musical talents for better understand- 
ing and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 

Each elementary school has a resident music specialist 
who is responsible for all music education in the building, 
with the exception of instruction on band and orchestral 
instruments. Each school has weekly lessons along with a 
performing choral group. All schools have song flute 
ensembles and/or recorder consorts. Some schools have 
guitar clubs, dance groups, or Orff bands. 

Our curriculum guide is based on the conceptual ap- 



69 



proach. We have a spiral curriculum that begins in 
kindergarten and continues through junior high school. 

General music in the junior high school is required of 
all seventh and eighth graders, and is available to ninth 
graders on an elective basis. General music in the seventh 
and eighth grades is basically designed for non-perform- 
ing students and, for many, it is their last formal contact 
with school music. Choral groups are available on an 
elective basis to all junior high students. 

The high school has course offerings for both perform- 
ing and non-performing students. A staff of two and one- 
third instructors offers courses in music appreciation, 
theory, guitar class, small and large vocal and instrumen- 
tal ensembles, instrumental instruction, and practice 
rooms for individual study. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an ex- 
perience not found in other areas within the music 
department. Orchestral string instruments are offered 
starting in Grade 3, while all band and orchestral in- 
struments are included from Grades 5 through 12. Every 
interested student has an opportunity to participate in 
small-group instruction and ensembles during school 
time, or after school as part of the extra-curricular pro- 
gram. We have seen a declining student population with 
an increasing number of instrumental students — from 
362 in June of 1971 to over 1000 as of January, 1980. 

Instrumental and choral ensembles participate in 
school and community programs throughout the school 
year. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF ART 

The Seventies were very productive years for the Art 
Department. The elective courses grow enormously, 
showing the continuing and increasing concern for the 
arts and the cultural concern of our children. 

The Seventies provided an elementary specialist housed 
in each elementary school, with an Art Room in all but 
two schools. This service provides for a more involved 
association between the Art Specialist and the students in 
the school and the staff. This is very important if they are 
going to serve the total needs of their school. 

The Seventies brought us stockroom facilities that 
lessen the bulk supplies in each school and provide inven- 
tory control. 

The Seventies brought us many awards for our students 
and some very handsome scholarship funds. They also 
found many of our graduates in an increasing number 
going to art schools and colleges. Some of our graduates 
entered the commercial world in art production, adver- 
tising, design, and art education. We are very proud of 
their accomplishments. 

The Seventies have brought all people in the Arts 
greater recognition from the community and from the in- 
dustrial world. We feel that this is the most important 
phase of the Seventies because through their recognition 
comes greater awareness and understanding of the 



cultural needs of our world. The arts are the most 
humanizing facet of our mechanized and computerized 
world today. The Art form is the oldest living record of 
man... many centuries before the record of any language 
...and to maintain this important phase of our responsi- 
bility to the future, we must keep working, learning, ex- 
perimenting, and caring. 

We hope that the Eighties will see a continuing growth 
for the Arts and that we will be able to provide our 
students with a richer program that will enhance their 
lives and their understanding. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
LANGUAGE ARTS 

On January 23, 1979, the Massachusetts State Board of 
Education adopted the "Regulations for Implementation 
of the Policy on Basic Skills- Improvement." The regula- 
tions require local school districts to establish minimum 
standards in reading, writing, and mathematics by Sep- 
tember, 1980, and minimum standards in listening and 
speaking by September, 1981. The regulations further re- 
quire that local school districts provide for the participa- 
tion of parents, teachers, administrators, employers, and 
the general public in the establishment and periodic 
review of minimum standards and in the overall curricu- 
lum and testing plans for early elementary, late elemen- 
tary, and secondary levels. 

On February 9, 1979, the School Committee appointed 
the language arts coordinator to direct the school system's 
efforts in planning Chelmford's Basic Skills Improvement 
and Competency Testing Program. In order to insure a 
broad base of participation in the development and 
review of the program, a Task Force consisting of mem- 
bers from the professional staff and the general public 
was established. The Task Force meets on the first Wed- 
nesday of each month at Parker Junior High School from 
7:30 to 9:00 p.m. It is composed of four subcommittees, 
each of which addresses an area of the state regulations — 
curriculum, testing, follow-up instruction, and publicity. 
All subcommittees have the responsibility of discussing 
and recommending plans and changes in their respective 
areas, of explaining the budget implications of their 
recommendations, and of indicating the degree of par- 
ticipation of each segment of the general public and the 
professional staff in developing their plans. Time con- 
straints preclude full participation of the general public 
in all of the specific tasks required by the state mandate. 
However, the Task Force does provide the general public 
with an avenue for input and the opportunity to react to 
suggestions and ideas formulated by the professional 
staff. 

During the past year, the professional staff has been 
working diligently on the testing and curriculum develop- 
ment aspects of the Basic Skills Program. The test results 
in reading, writing, and mathematics of the State 
Department's Basic Skills Assessment administered last 
spring provide valuable points of reference for determ- 
ining standards in curriculum. Criterion-referenced 
mathematics and reading tests are currently being field- 
tested in grades 3 and 5. A writing test for grade 8 will be 
administered and scored by the staff in February, 1980 



70 



The two language arts guides written this summer, 
Reading: K-8, and The Basic Skills Assessment Pro- 
gram in Writing, provide the basis not only for develop- 
ing minimal competency levels in basic skills, but also for 
advancing the pursuit of excellence in all content areas. 
The objectives developed for Reading: K-8 are arranged 
in sequence and address major categories of reading skills 
in vocabulary, comprehension, and locating information. 
Although grade level designations are provided for each 
of the objectives, the teacher decides where on the hier- 
archy of reading skills a particular student belongs. This 
means that students who need to learn skills listed at 
earlier levels are taught those skills, using, however, 
materials at the student's interest level. By the same 
token, students who excel in achieving their grade level 
objectives in reading are encouraged to progress as rapid- 
ly as possible within the framework of the recommended 
sequence of skills. The Basic Skills Assessment Program 
in Writing is designed as a learning tool for all teachers 
of writing. It provides a description of methods of 
evaluating writing samples, the guidelines for holistic 
scoring of writing samples, information on the planned 
testing program at elementary and secondary levels, and 
a description of the follow-up procedures employed by 
language arts teachers with students who fail the writing 
test. 

The community and professional staff in Chelmsford 
have shown interest and concern in developing, im- 
plementing, monitoring, and evaluating curriculum that 
addresses the basic skills needs of all students. In the final 
analysis, the success of all curriculum programs is directly 
proportional to this commitment. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
SCIENCE AND HEALTH EDUCATION 

After almost two decades of holding a favored place in 
education — with millions of dollars in federal support 
and a clear-cut mandate to assure national security — the 
sciences are once again fighting for their place in Ameri- 
can schools. The back-to-basics movement — with its em- 
phasis on reading, writing and mathematics — has cut in- 
to the amount of time devoted to science in American 
schools. 

Increasing public skepticism about the benefits of some 
scientific advancements and changes in national policy 
have caused federal educational priorities to shift from 
science to new issues such as vocational education, 
remedial programs and the rights of handicapped 
students. Enrollments in high school science courses 
which soared after 1957 and reached a peak in 1970 have 
been decreasing ever since. 

The multimillion dollar federal curriculum effort that 
promised to let students "discover" scientific truths for 
themselves ran into opposition. A recent NSF study of 
pre-college science reported that 90 percent of the 
teachers have now returned to the traditional textbook 
approach. There has been no return to the manpower 
shortage in the scientific fields that prompted the boom 
in science education in the late 1950's. 

Schools are now facing new problems such as develop- 
ing scientific literacy among ordinary citizens. 



The late 1960's brought a moderating of the cold war 
and a reduced sense of urgency for the production of pro- 
fessional scientists. Also during this time the social unrest 
surrounding the war in Vietnam and other social issues 
produced new public attitudes toward science. The pro- 
blem was intensified by increasing concerns over pollu- 
tion and ecological issues. Education shifted to broader 
social objectives, including the use of education as a vehi- 
cle for the upward mobility of the disadvantaged. NDEA 
and NSF funding plummeted to amounts of 1/3 to 1/2 
their maximum levels of 1968. 

Some science educators are not disturbed by the sug- 
gestion, increasing in popularity, that training in the 
scientific mode of inquiry is not accepted as a "basic" sub- 
ject. 

Science education faces other problems besides financ- 
ing, priority and academic weaknesses that the back-to- 
basics movement is designed to correct. 

In many systems, course content is watered down to ac- 
commodate student weaknesses. Science is either read or 
taught with little in the way of physical equipment or 
facilities. In many areas lecturing and reading from a 
single textbook remain the dominant method of teach- 
ing. 

The federal government is nof likely to return to the 
approach of the 1950's — a massive infusion of curriculum 
projects. If we have a major curriculum reform in science 
education in the next ten years it will come from the bot- 
tom up. 

The goal of future science education should be to 
develop a scientific literacy that includes the fundamen- 
tal relationship of individual human beings to the en- 
vironment and to each other in communities. Science 
education should be directed toward understanding the 
various aspects of the environment and the ethical deci- 
sions involved in the wise use of natural resources and the 
environment and its resources are giving way to a new 
ecological ethic of prudence and stewardship. In the 
future we must maintain a balance between the use of the 
environment and resources and other societal needs such 
as productivity, security and employment. 

Science education should be directed toward greater 
understanding of the interdependence of individuals on 
each other, and on their environment at the local, 
regional, national and global levels. 

What are the implications of all of this for curriculum 
and instruction? In the past we have neglected or omitted 
most of the problems which are and will be essential. 
Some problems appropriate for future science education 
are population growth, food demands and agriculture, 
natural resources and energy, nuclear proliferation and 
global interdependence. 

Science programs should contribute to personal 
development and to specific human qualities such as 
values and decision making. Ethical discussion based on 
the benefits and also the consequences of the develop- 
ment, use, recycling and wasting of natural resources can 



71 



and should be incorporated into various science pro- 
grams. We should not teach students our values, but we 
should present them with critical choices. We can no 
longer avoid values in science teaching, thus neglecting 
the human qualities involved in choice, decision and 
responsibility. In a period when new values are emerging, 
we need to look to the future and participate in the con- 
struction of a new society. 

Science education should aim toward the development 
of a populace whose decisions are personally informed, 
ecologically sound, ethically defensible and socially com- 
patible. The most important result of future science pro- 
grams must be a critical attitude. 

With these considerations in mind, the science pro- 
gram in the Chelmsford Public Schools is in the process of 
a minor revision. At the elementary level we will be mov- 
ing from a totally experimental and inquiry approach to 
one which blends experimentation with textual readings. 
This revision is in keeping with the current educational 
needs to strengthen the reading background of our 
students. 

At the junior high level we are beginning a three year 
phase out of the ISCS program. This program will be 
replaced by a life, earth and physical science sequence 
which is currently taught at other levels in grades 7, 8 and 
9. 

The senior high science program is a multi -leveled pro- 
gram in biology, chemistry and physics. Students may 
elect to broaden their scientific background in such addi- 
tional areas as Anatomy and Physiology, AP Chemistry, 
Clinical Techniques, Photography and Botany. Planning 
is currently underway to include a semester course in the 
Metallurgical Laboratory as part of the science cur- 
riculum. Future planning will hopefully develop more 
courses that are directly related to life skills. 



Health Education 

Health Education is a current priority in our develop- 
ing curriculum. A unit on Physical Maturation is being 
developed for implementation in the sixth grade cur- 
riculum. 

With the assistance of Captain Ron Wikander of the 
Chelmsford Fire Department, we are planning towards 
the implementation of a "Learn Not To Burn" unit in the 
near future at the 4th grade level. 

The unit on Human Sexuality taught at grade 10 is 
continually being revised and strengthened. This is an 
optional unit that more parents and students are taking 
advantage of. 

CPR continues to be offered to staff through in-service 
programs and to students in grade 9 on a free time avail- 
ability basis. Students in the Home Economics First Aid 
course and the Clinical Techniques course are also of- 
fered the CPR program. 

The content of Health Education courses and pro- 



grams varies from community to community. Topics such 
as disease, body structures, feelings, sex education and 
health service etc. will be found in most curricula. While 
the specific content is important, our challenge as 
educators is to provide the students with the background 
and tools to make concerned and intelligent decisions. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
SOCIAL STUDIES 

By its very nature, social studies involves change. 
Chelmsford's social studies curriculum reflects this pro- 
cess. Rather than change for its own sake, however, we 
strive for continuous improvement. 

Reflecting this drive for continuous curriculum im- 
provement are several current social studies projects in 
Chelmsford. Briefly, they are: development of a map and 
globe sequence for grades K-9; field testing of a grade 
nine unit on the holocaust; implementation of the 
"Leadership, Psychosocial Giftedness and Decision- 
Making" project in the high school. 

The need for a grade-to-grade map and globe se- 
quence resulted from numerous meetings with elemen- 
tary and secondary teachers. What we wanted was to list 
geographic objectives that should be introduced, rein- 
forced and/or "mastered" at each grade level. 

The new sequence should avoid needless repetition and 
insure an orderly progression of geographic knowledge as 
one part of a comprehensive social studies program. Ef- 
fectiveness of the new sequence will become apparent 
within two years. 

For some time secondary social studies teachers have 
researched when and how to most effectively teach about 
the holocaust. Nearly all the nationally validated projects 
recommend an indepth holocaust curriculum in grade 
eight or nine. 

Working with the Holocaust Dissemination Center of 
the Brookline (MA) Public Schools, one ninth grade 
Chelmsford teacher is piloting a six to eight week holo- 
caust unit presented in a political science perspective. 
While focusing primarily on the Jewish tragedy, the 
Armenian experience or that of the Cambodian people 
afford relevant historical and current comparisons. 

"Leadership, Psychosocial Giftedness and Decision- 
Making" is a federally funded project being implemented 
at Chelmsford High School in cooperation with Universi- 
ty of Lowell and the public schools in Andover and 
Lowell. Using honors and/or advanced placement classes 
in many disciplines, the project fosters curriculum 
development in moral and ethical reasoning within ex- 
isting content areas. 



In this program, teachers of honors and /or advanced 
placement classes attended a summer workshop at 
University of Lowell to learn how to identify students with 
potential or actual leadership ability or unusual human 
sensitivity. They also received instruction on developing 
supporting teaching materials. 



72 



During the school year teachers and students continue 
to utilize the rich human resources and facilities of the 
University of Lowell. Professors from the university meet 
with students and teachers to exchange ideas about their 
special interests and discuss how decisions by leaders in 
these fields affect all of our lives. 

These three projects, then, reflect our concern for con- 
tinuous curriculum improvement. Through research, 
staff development and classroom experience our 
educators encourage young peopole to become informed 
citizens who are ready to participate in a democratic 
society and global community. 

FROM THE SUPERVISOR OF 
INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

During the 1978-79 school year, the Chelmsford school 
libraries showed growth in services and use. The report of 
the Graphic Artist and the Television Aide are included 
in this report, for they are a part of the Instructional 
Media Department. 

At the elementary library level the library assistants 
continued their enthusiastic efforts and activities. Four 
workshops were held for them, each taking place in a dif- 
ferent school library. Some of the subjects addressed were 
book maintenance and repair, standardization of pro- 
cedures in the libraries and the ONE-TO-ONE reading 
program. At one workshop the Social Studies Coor- 
dinator spoke to the assistants informing them about the 
social studies program. At another the Graphic Artist 
and the Repair Technician demonstrated equipment 
operation and minor repair. 

The library instruction that continued in each school 
contributed to the sixth graders performing very well on 
the SRA test administered in September 1979. 215 
students performed between the 76-99 percentiles, 208 
between the 54-75 percentiles and 423 performed above 
the 50th percentile. 

Both the McCarthy and Parker Junior High Schools 
were involved with student orientation sessions. Classes 
came to the library with their teachers to work on pro- 
jects, and students browsed to find books for leisure 
reading. Formal library instruction was also given to the 



four sixth grades housed at the Parker Junior High 
School. A very successful volunteer mother program was 
again organized at the McCarthy Junior High School. 

The High School library continued to expand the 
amount of materials in its collection. It was a center for 
teacher planning. Teachers worked with students using 
library materials in conjunction with course work. The 
periodical and microfilm collections as well as the vertical 
file were in great demand in completing research pro- 
jects. 

The Instructional Media Center office located in the 
high school witnessed a very busy year. Approximately 
15,000 items including books and audio- visual software 
were catalogued and processed. The audio-visual collec- 
tion was used by all schools in the system, filling over 
4,000 requests. 

With each passing year, the legacy of students and staff 
interested in adding visual to their classroom presenta- 
tions increases. The Graphic Artist produced transparen- 
cies, lettered charts and posters, 35 mm. slides, audio and 
video tapes. In addition, there was an increased demand 
for synchronized slide tapes. 

The television studio at the high school broadcast 
1,396 hours of pre-recorded video tapes over its three 
closed circuit channels and its mobile viewing unit. At the 
Parker and McCarthy Junior High Schools, science, 
music, English and social studies teachers used television 
programs in their classrooms. 143 new video tapes were 
added to the video tape library. The studio expanded its 
production activities as well. 

Ever since the elementary library program began, an 
annual tea in honor of the volunteer mothers has been 
given as an expression of appreciation for their countless 
hours of work in the libraries without which the program 
would be far less effective. In June, 1979, the tea was held 
at the Westlands School. Dr. Rivard expressed the 
gratitude of the administration, and Mrs. Silver and Col- 
onel Peters were present representing the School Commit- 
tee. 

The following table supplies statistical information on 
the school library system: 



BYAM 
CENTER 
HARRINGTON 
NORTH 

south row 
westlands 
McCarthy 

PARKER 
HIGH SCHOOL 

TOTAL 



umber of 


Number of 


Number of 


Books 


Books 


Students 


1978 


1979 




9,323 


12,233 


744 


7,100 


8,442 


509 


10,328 


12,315 


765 


8,158 


9,466 


588 


7,706 


9,149 


572 


8,986 


10,742 


828 


15,307 


16,065 


1,172 


10,950 


12,201 


1,132 


22,115 


24,237 


2,112 



108,586 



111,850 



Books* 


Circulation 


per Student 




16 


26,582 


14 


23,157 


16 


19,607 


16 


20,270 


16 


17,391 


13 


19,384 


13 


13,217 


9 


14,913 


11 


8,109 




*162,630 



73 



♦MEDIA PROGRAMS, DISTRICT AND SCHOOL 

published by the American Library Association, 1975, 
recommends 16 to 24 books per user. 

*The total circulation dropped about 10,000, student 
population droped 514. The average number of books 
borrowed per student was 19 in 1977-1978 and remains 
the same during the 1978-1979 school year. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

During the spring, some 5,000 students grades 4-12 
took part in our Fitness Testing Program. This test was 
developed by the American Association of Health, Phy- 
sical Education, and Recreation, and is supported by the 
President's Council on Physical Fitness. The battery of 
tests consists of six parts. 

We had 1,400 students score above the 50th percentile 
in all six tests, and approximately 290 scored above the 
85th percentile. The tests measure most of the large mus- 
cle groups and give us an indication of the fitness level of 
our students in comparison to other students in the coun- 
try. 

We are continuing with our postural screening in 
grades 5-8 and also with "Project Build-up" that were 
both begun in 1978. 

Project Adventure programs were begun this year at 
the McCarthy school. These programs are an outgrowth 
of Outward Bound experiences and deal with developing 
self-trust, self-awareness, and the ability to cooperate in 
groups and problem solving. We hope to utilize this pro- 
gram more in months to come. 

Athletics 

We continued to have good success in the athletic 
arena. We have achieved a comprehensive and well- 
rounded athletic program. 

We had good representation in many state tour- 
naments, and had many athletes receive individual 
honors at both the local and state levels. Many of our 
athletes, boys and girls, received athletic scholarships to 
the colleges of their choice. 

The big news this year is that the Merrimack Valley 
Conference has expanded from 10 to 14 teams. Lowell is 
now part of the MVC, and we will compete with them in 
all sports along with Haverhill, Greater Lowell, and 
Greater Lawrence. 

It is a pleasure to announce that our Boys' Indoor 
Track Team won the State Championship. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Since September 1974, the Special Education Depart- 
ment has implemented Chapter 766, the Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Special Education Law of 1972. In Sep- 
tember 1978, P.L. L94-142, the Education of Handi- 



capped Children Act became effective. Both laws entitle 
special needs students to the right of a free and ap- 
propriate education. Students between the ages of three 
through twenty-one years who have had a team evalua- 
tion and have not received a high school diploma (or its 
equivalent), and for whom it has been determined by the 
evaluation team to have a special need, are eligible for 
special education services. 

As of September 1979, 623 students have been receiv- 
ing services provided through the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department. This represents 7.8 percent of 
Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

Chelmsford has a comprehensive special education 
department to serve the special needs of children in our 
community. To develop and implement the individual 
educational plans, the staff includes specialists in the 
areas of learning disabilities, speech pathology, adaptive 
physical education, occupational therapy, teacher of the 
visually impaired, tutors for the hearing impaired, 
psychological services, social services, and vocational ser- 
vices. To serve the needs of students who require more 
specialized educational programs, there are twelve 
resource classes staffed by special education teachers who 
are assisted by instructional aides. 

The Merrimack Special Education Collaborative, in 
which Chelmsford participates, continues to provide ef- 
fective and cost -efficient programs for children with low 
incidence disabilities. Classes are located in the towns of 
Dracut and Billerica, and serve the needs of children 
from Chelmsford, Billerica, Dracut, Tewksbury and 
Westford. 

Federal and State grants have provided funds necessary 
to expand services for special needs students. The 
Chelmsford Public Schools has received a total of 
$142,127, to develop programs which would otherwise 
have been provided with local funds. Two specific areas 
in which funds have been utilized during 1979-80 are a 
preschool class for special needs students aged three and 
four years, and in participation in a vocational program 
to prepare special needs students for a work experience. 

The Special Education Department continues to place 
emphasis upon early identification of preschool children 
who may have special needs. Early identification and in- 
tervention will provide the necessary educational oppor- 
tunity for success in school and may possibly curtail the 
length of special services a child would need to receive. 

The Chelmsford School Committee believes that all 
special needs students should have an opportunity to suc- 
ceed in school. The committee is ever mindful of the 
fiscal responsibilities and is continually exploring means 
to provide effective programs while maintaining a 
responsible budget. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
THE TITLE I PROGRAM 

Title One is enjoying an outstanding beginning of its 
fifth year with the children in grades one through four at 
the North and Westlands Schools. 



74 



Concentrating as ever, in the areas of Reading and 
Mathematics and stressing the basic skills which are 
deemed so important by educators, we have augmented 
our program through the use of computer terminals at 
the Westlands School and by individualized computers at 
the North School. This will be our first full year that these 
new teaching tools are being utilized and evaluated. To 
date we find the children have readily adapted to these 
new teaching methods and in the case of the first graders 
who are "neophytes" to this program it is amazing that 
they show no fear but instead fight for their every second 
of allotted time on "the machine." 

Our specific goals which remain the same are, we feel, 
worth repeating. They are as follows: 

1 . To produce a measurable effect on pupil growth in 
Reading and/or Mathematics. 

2. To diagnose, design, and implement individualized 
instruction utilizing Pre-Post testing used only in 
this program and the use of multi-media materials. 

3. To improve the students self-image and build their 
confidence. 

4. To provide reinforcement and feedback to each 
student and appropriate Personnel and Parents so 
that they are aware of successes rather than fail- 
ures. 

5. At the request of the P.A.C. leaders and mem- 
bership, a new goal stressing better communication 
enlightening all Parents and interested supporters 
on the achievements of the Program as a whole, as 
well as, the individual through the monthly news- 
letter, the individualized handbook, personal tele- 
phone calls, and written correspondence when re- 
quired will be atempted to be improved. 

We wish to have all understand that a child's participa- 
tion in this Project does not mean that a student is not 
capable but just that he/she is for one of many reasons 
not at the present working or perhaps has not in the past 
worked to one's potential. Our small group instruction in 
the past has corrected over 90% of this problem along 
with the cooperation of all concerned naturally. 

The administration is overly pleased with the large in- 
crease in P.A.C. Parental participation at our monthly 
meetings this year. P.A.C. being a mandated part of Ti- 
tle I, this is very rewarding. Perhaps our change of format 
has added interest. The Director has arranged an agenda 
for the year with each meeting involving either an instruc- 
tor speaking on educational topics or Parental participa- 
tion which should aid the Parents in helping at home. 
High attendance brings new ideas to the group which 
have been greatly received and certainly beneficial to all. 

Continuity between the educator and the Parent in to- 
day's society is a must to improve a child's learning. The 
blending of the two for the good of one is our main goal. 
We hope this increased attendance will continue as we 
feel the Program is both beneficial and rewarding to 
specific children. While the need for additional services is 



there, unfortunately the federal funding is insufficient. 
In Conclusion: 

The year 1980 will continue to bring new challenges 
and problems. As we plan for the future, our concern 
regarding the economy of the town, state and nation em- 
phasizes the need of total commitment from all facets of 
the community in order to guarantee the best use of the 
tax dollars and still provide excellence in educational 
programs and opportunities. The School Committee has 
continued to effect budget economies in the development 
of the 1980-81 budget with a clearer documentation and 
presentation of program needs related to budget requests 
and declining enrollments. The School Committee 
recognizes that qualitative dimensions of the school sys- 
tems' programs can only be measured in terms of what 
the town wants and how it values the returns on its invest- 
ment. The budget recommended for the 1980-81 school 
year is contained in the Finance Committee's Annual 
Report. 

Sincere thanks once again extended to the town of- 
ficials and boards, to the school personnel, to the Parent- 
Teacher Organizations, to advisory study committees, 
school volunteer workers, and to the citizens for their 
cooperation and assistance this past year. 

The School Committee is most appreciative of the 
assistance rendered by the Chelmsford Jaycee-ettes when 
its members coordinated the efforts of local organizations 
and citizens in sponsoring the town-wide Pre-School Vi- 
sion Screening Clinic on September 15, 1979. 

Special reference is made to the retirement of the 
following members of the staff. Their service remains 
esteemed in the hearts and minds of the many who knew 
them. 

Mr. Arthur J. Baker, Custodian, High School 
Mrs. Marylynne E. Burleigh, Nurse, Westlands School 
Mrs. Mary K. Giavaras, Secretary, High School 
Mrs. Margaret J. Griffin, Guidance Secretary, High 

School 
Mrs. Gertrude L. Grondin, Grade 1 Teacher, West- 
lands School 
Mrs. Deborah G. Mason, Administrative Assistant 

Westlands School 
Mrs. Ruth E. Moriarty, Lunch Manager, Center 

School 
Mrs. Joyce E. Peterson, Secretary, School Adminis- 
tration Building 
Mrs. Constance M. Saulis, Lunch Manager, 
High School 



IN MEMORIAM 

As we knew him in life, so shall we remember him: 

Mr. James J. Tansey 
Custodian, McCarthy Jr. High School 



75 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



SEWER COMMISSION 



The committee met often during the year to monitor 
progress on the new combination soccer/football field 
constructed in accordance with Town Meeting direction. 
The completion of these activities in the fall of 1979 
signaled an end to the committee's obligation to provide a 
new high school facility which officially began with ap- 
proval, at a November 1971 Special Town Meeting, of 
the requisite bond issue. 

The architects, Day and Zimmerman, Inc., completed 
the necessary plans by the following spring, thus permit- 
ting the ground breaking ceremony which took place on 
May 6, 1972 and construction and acquisition of equip- 
ment progressed. On September 23, 1974 the school 
doors were first opened to the town's children. On 
November 24, 1974 the townspeople were invited to at- 
tend the dedication of the school during which an award 
was presented to the school from the American Associa- 
tion of School Architects. A videotape of these 
ceremonies, along with other significant items, was plac- 
ed in a time capsule and sealed in the cornerstone of the 
school with the intention that it be opened in the year 
2074. 

The committee is pleased to announce official accep- 
tance of the new facility by the School Committee in 
January of 1980. 

Funding for the school has been shared between local 
taxpayers and the Commonwealth with the state paying 
65% of the principal and interest costs. The ten-year 
bonds, floated at a rate of 4.4% will mature in 1982. 

The committee is delighted to point out, that despite 
the mandated or necessary addition of several major pro- 
ject "add-ons" not planned for in initial estimates, the 
total construction cost of approximately $9,875,000 is 
significantly less than the $10,340,000 granted by Town 
Meeting and that almost half a million dollars in unused 
borrowing authority has been returned to the town. 

The committee would like to extend to the people of 
Chelmsford sincere apreciation for their support and 
faith throughout the many years of this project and for 
the opportunity to have served the community in such a 
positive way. 

James A. Sullivan, Chairman 

Robert M. Sexton, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Harry McKeon, Financial Secretary 

Carol C. Cleven, School Committee Rep. 

Anthony DeProfio 

Richard Miller 

Carol DeCarolis 

Paul Krenitsky 

Louis H. Murray 



DennisJ. Ready, Chairman 
Charles L. Weaver, Vice Chairman 
Dr. Burton A. Segall, Clerk 
MatthewJ. Doyle 



Term Expires 
1981 
1980 
1982 
1979 



This year was an extremely busy one for the Sewer 
Commission. The year began with a series of meetings 
with State and Federal pollution control agencies and the 
City of Lowell. Joint Meetings were held with the Board 
of Health and Board of Selectmen. 

A plan to solve the towns wastewater disposal problems 
had been submitted to the State and the Environmental 
Protection Agency in 1976. The State had approved it, 
EPA had not. The following year the Clean Water Act, 
under which the plan had been developed, was 
significantly amended. The new regulations required 
careful evaluation of all existing problems, this had not 
been done and the new regulation required cost effective 
solutions. Sewers were now viewed as the last resort. In 
addition, where once there had been 90% EPA funding 
for lateral sewers now no support was available. 

Clearly, because of the loss of funding and the new 
regulations, an amended facilities plan is needed. During 
this past year the Commission interviewed engineering 
firms and selected a consultant who will update the towns 
waste disposal plan. Ninety percent of the cost of the revi- 
sions will be directly funded by EPA. The Commission 
will also apply for reimbursement for previous sewer and 
septage studies when the study application is submitted. 

The Sewer Commission conducted two studies of its 
own during the year; a cost analysis of town wide sewering 
($70 million), and a pollution survey. 

The failure to implement past proposal were initially 
the result of a town plan to build a treatment plant in 
North Chelmsford which was rejected in favor of a 
regional plant in Lowell. The last plan submitted, a 
town -wide sewer system, was too costly for government 
funding and was not based upon a real documentation of 
town-wide problems. 

The updating of the facilities plan requires a com- 
prehensive, door to door, needs survey, which will begin 
this spring. 



TREE DEPARTMENT 

As in the past, we are continuing our safety pruning 
program throughout the town. 

We transplanted a few maple trees made available to 
the town at no cost, for which we are thankful. We hope 
to continue a limited planting program. 

We are continuing with a no increase budget, keeping 
safety our first priority. 



76 



I would like to thank everyone for their cooperation 
during the past year; looking forward to a safe year 
ahead. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 
Tree Warden 

TOWN TREASURER 



Balance as of July 1, 1978 
Receipts to June 30, 1979 

Paid out on warrants 
Balance as of June 30, 1979 



$ 2,709,546.78 
35,952,760.80 

$38,662,307.58 
-34,439,823.90 

$ 4,222,483.68 



TAX COLLECTOR 

Balances as of June 30, 1979 

Levy of 1973: 

Personal Property $ 0.00 

Excise 46,013.55 

Farm Excise 0.00 

Real Estate 0.00 



Levy of 1974: 

Personal Property 
Excise 
Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1975: 

Personal Property 
Excise 
Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1976: 

Personal Property 
Excise 
Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1977: 

Personal Property 
Excise 

Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1978: 

Personal Property 
Excise 
Farm Excise 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1979: 

Personal Property 
Excise 
Farm Excise 
Real Estate 



$ 333.26 

32,036.84 

0.00 

0.00 

$ 809.62 

58,721.82 

0.00 

0.00 

$ 7,336.13 

54,346.07 

0.00 

1,318.48 

$ 7,486.00 

60,753.73 

0.00 

14,423.93 

$ 16,685.16 

96,359.89 

140.25 

76,515.11 

$ 28,158.59 

498,453.57 

246.65 

543,967.71 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 

Ernest F. Day Term expires 1981 

Board of Selectmans Administrative Assistant 

Evelyn M. Haines Resigned 

Norman E. Thidemann Acting Administrative Ass't. 



Town Counsel 



James M. Harrington 

Police Chief 

Robert E. Germann, Retired 

Deputy Police Chief 

Walter W. Edwards 
Armand J. Caron 



Term expires 1980 

Acting Police Chief 
James C. Greska 

Fire Chief 
Frederick H. Reid 



Cemetery Superintendent 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1980 

Park Superintendent 
Donald P. Gray Term expires 1980 

Director of Public Health 

Thomas W. Morris Term expires 1980 

Board of Health Physician 

Michael A. Gilchrist, M.D- Term expires 1980 

Superintendent of Streets 

Louis R. Rondeau Term expires 1980 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term expires 1980 

Building Inspectors 
Peter J. McHugh, Jr. (Deceased 1/16/80) 

Term expired 1980 
Bruce H. Clark (Local Inspector) Term expires 1980 



Neal C. Stanley 

Plumbing Inspector 

William H.Shedd 



Gas Inspector 



Term expires 1980 



Wiring Inspector 

Francis E. Cunningham 
Harold M. Tucke, Jr. (Retired) 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Town Aide & Council on Aging 
Kathleen Robinson 



Assistant Town Clerk 

Elizabeth D. Zamanakos 



Assistant Treasurer 

Florence M. Ramsay 



Planning Board Clerk Zoning Appeal Board Clerk 

Jacqueline A. Sheehy Velma Munroe 

Judith E. Carter (Resigned) 

Veteran's Grave Officer 

George E. Baxendale 



77 



Insect Pest Control Officer 
Donald P. Gray 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 



Recreation Director 
Richard A. Page 



Youth Center Coordinator 

Peter Saulis 



Highway Administrative Ass't. 
Pearl Koulas 

Dog Officer 

Frank Wojtas, Jr. 

Frank Wojtas, Sr. (Deceased) 



Veteran's Agent 
Mary McAuliffe 

Ass't. Dog Officer 

Stasia Wojtas 



Labor Relation Advisor 

Murphy, Lamere & Murphy 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

BALANCE SHEET— JUNE 30, 1979 

REVENUE ACCOUNTS 

ASSETS 



Cash: 



General: 

In Banks 
Invested 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 
Invested 

Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes: 

Levy of 1974 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1975 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1976 

Personal Property 

Real Estau- 
Levy of 1977 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1978 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1979 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Lew of 1973 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 
Lew of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Lew of 1979 

Farm Excise: 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 

Tax Titles and Possessions: 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 

Departmental: 

Off Dutv Work Details 
Public Buildings 
Cemetcrv 

Water Districts: 

Liens Added to Taxes: 
Lew of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 

Aid To Highways: 
State 



2,371,118.74 
1,600.000.00 



333.26 

809.62 

7,336.13 
1.318.48 

7,486.00 
14,423.93 

16,685.16 
76,515.11 

28,158.59 
543,967.71 

46,013.55 
32,036.84 
58.721.82 
54.346.07 
60,753.73 
96,359.89 
498.453.57 

140.25 
246.65 

12,006.31 
13.404.41 

5.474.45 

225.00 

5,091.50 



257.10 
120.00 
834.20 



3.971,118.74 



451,238.69 



697.033.99 



846.685.47 



386.90 



25.410.72 



10.790.95 



Accounts Payable 

Payroll Deductions 

Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 
School Department 
Selectmen 

Agency: 

County Sale of Dogs 
County - Dog Licenses 
Recording Fees 

Tailings: 

Unclaimed Checks 

Trust and Investment Fund Income: 
Conservation Wright 

State Grant: 

Department of Elder Affairs 

Federal Grants: 
Public Law 92 512 

School: 

Public Law 81 874 
Title I PL89 10 
Title IB PL89 313 
Title II PL89 10 
Title IVB PL93 380 
Title VIB PL94 142 
Public Law 94 482 

Revolving Funds: 
School Lunch 
School Athletics 
Merrimack Education Center 
Library Carriage House 
Renovation 

Sale of Real Estate 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 

Appropriation Balances Forward 

Special Project Balances Forward 

Appropriations Authorized From: 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 
Public Law 92 512 
Sidewalks 

Sidewalks- Acton Road 
Preliminary Project Study 

Stabilization Fund: 
Highway Equipment 

Loans Authorized: 
Sewer Construction 

Transfers Authorized: 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 
Stabilization Fund 

Overdrawn Overlay Accounts: 
levy of 1970 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 
Levy of 1977 
Lew of 1978 

Underestimated Assessments: 
Mosquito Control 

Revenue: 

Appropriations Voted for 
Fiscal 1980 





280.430.71 




171.629.94 


1.850.00 




1.500.00 




1,387.00 


4,737.00 


66.00 




717.05 




8.00 


791.05 



451.238.69 

215.493.19 

1.405.79 

272.49 

.70 

10,541.58 

9.228.01 

18,669.91 

22.557.48 
3.017.45 
2.375.35 

3,318.42 



5.617.76 
3,487.08 
1.126 86 



706.850.36 



31 268.70 

4.767.02 

17.717.50 

1.200.000.00 

742.355.28 

472.613.81 



5.263.42 




40.015.38 




20.000.00 




20.449.94 


85.728.74 




1.200.000.00 


65.278.80 




20,449.94 


85,728.74 


744.64 




266.91 




711.75 




2.606.56 




1.775.10 




15.950.65 


22.055.61 




13.535.26 




24.364.871 00 


31.810.367.75 



1.211.30 
120.300.38 



78 






Receipts Reserved For Appropriation: 



State Aid to Libraries 




11,906.26 


Reserve Fund Overlay Surplus 




76,763.45 


Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 






Motor Vehicle Excise 


846.685.47 




Farm Excise 


386.90 




Tax Title and Possessions 


25,410.72 




Departmental 


10,790.95 




Aid to Highways 


120,300.38 


\ 


Water Liens 


1,211.30 


1.004,785.72 


Overlay Reserved For Abatements: 






Levy of 1979 




48,414.40 


Overestimated Assessments: 






County Hospital 


4,834.38 




County Tax 


50.427.84 




State Parks 


5,671.10 




Air Pollution Control 


87.57 




Special Education 


957.00 


61.977.89 


Surplus Revenue 




1,688.848.22 


Surplus Revenue Encumbered 




823,679.00 


Appropriation Control: 






Fiscal 1980: 






Revenue 


23,324,822.00 




Transfers 


1.040,049.00 


24.364.871.00 




ACCOUNTS 


31,810.367.75 


NON-REVENUE 




Cash-In Banks 




80,556.96 
80,556.96 


Appropriation Balances: 




School Construction 




80,556.96 
80.556.96 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit 

General 
Outside Debt Limit 
General 



Serial Loans: 

Inside Debt Limit 
General: 
Schools 



20.000.00 

6.945.000.00 
6,965,000.00 



20.000.00 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1979 

Trust and Investment Funds: 

Cash and Securities: 

In Custody of Treasurer 
In Custody of Library Trustees 
In Custody of Board of Selectmen 
In Custody of Veterans 

Emergency Fund Committee 



In Custody of Treasurer: 
Geo. W. Barris Varney 

Playground 
Conservation Fund 
Stabilization Fund 
Insurance Sinking Fund 
Cemetery Funds: 

Geo. W. Barris Memorial 

Perpetual Care 

Adams Emerson 

In Custody of Library Trustees: 
Library Funds: 
Amos F. Adams 
Geo. W. Barris 
Frances Clark 
Clement Fund 
Albert H. Davis 
Frederick B. Edwards 
Nathan B. Edwards 
Victor E. Edwards 
Adams Emerson 
Ora Flint 
George Memorial 
Thomas P. Proctor 
Salina Richardson 
Joseph E. Warren 
Gertrude Wright 

Cemetery Fund: 
Aaron George 

In Custody of Board of Selectmen: 
Emma Gay- Varney Playground 

In Custody of Veterans Emergency 
Fund Committee: 
Veterans Emergency Fund 



2.723.70 
64.772.67 
78,078.90 
61,912.54 

5.926.04 

263.045.76 

634.19 



20.834.39 

1.085.96 

1,242.45 

18,189.10 

838.93 
4,083.15 

843.58 
1.392.42 

170.48 
3.974.01 
2.332.09 
8.938.78 

455.26 
1,350.71 

810.26 

1.967.97 



477,093.80 

68.509.54 

487.04 

7.301.67 



553.392.05 






477.093.80 



68.509.54 
487.04 

7.301.67 



553.392.05 



EDUCATIONAL COLLABORATIVE BOARD FUND 
Section 4-E Chapter 40, General Laws 

Cash In Custody of Treasurer 71,691.91 



Outside Debt Limit 
General: 
Schools 



6.945,000.00 
6,965,000.00 



DEBT STATEMENT 



Bond Issue 


Interest 


Outstanding 


Payments 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 




Rate 


6-30-78 


1979 


6-30-79 


Due 1980 


Due 1980 


So. Row School 


3.5 


135,000. 


45,000. 


90,000. 


45,000. 


3,150. 


1972 High School #1 


4.9 


720,000. 


240,000. 


480,000. 


240,000. 


23.520. 


1972 High School #2 


4.4 


4,250,000. 


850,000. 


3,400,000. 


850,000. 


130,900. 


1972 High School #3 


— 


00. 


100,000. 


00. 


00. 


00. 


Junior High School 


3.25 


635,000. 


110,000. 


525,000. 


110,000. 


17,063. 


Westland-Harrington Schools 


4.3 


1,500.000. 


160,000. 


1,340,000. 


160,000. 


57,620. 


Byam School 


6.0 


1.235,000. 


105,000. 


1,130,000. 


105,000. 


64,650. 


Crystal Lake Restoration 


— 


00. 


34,214. 


00. 


00. 


00. 


TOTALS 


- 


8,475,000. 


1,644,214. 


6,965.000. 


1,510,000. 


296,903. 



79 



REVENUE SHARING FUNDS P.L. 92-512 

Balance July 1. 1978 498,283.77 

Plus Receipts: 
Entitlements: 

July 1, 1978 June 30, 1979 465,040.00 

Interest: 

July 1, 1978 June 30, 1979 72,203.32 537,243.32 



1,035,527.09 



Less Authorized Appropriations: 
Fire Department - Wages 
Police Department Wages 
Sidewalks 

Sidewalks — Acton Road 
Audit 
Preliminary Project Study 

Plus Funds Returned: 
Audit Appropriation 

Appropriations Forwarded — 
Fiscal 1980: 
Sidewalks 

Sidewalks - Acton Road 
Preliminary Project Study 

Balance June 30. 1979 



290,000.00 

290,000.00 

8,817.70 

40,749.50 

20,000.00 

20,000.00 



669,567.20 
365,959.89 

20.000.00 



5,263.42 
40,015.38 
20,000.00 



65,278.80 



451.238.69 



ANTIRECESSION FISCAL ASSISTANCE FUNDS P.L. 94-369 

Balance July 1, 1978 17,373.79 

Plus Receipts: 
Entitlements: 

July 1, 1978 June 30, 1979 4,308.00 

Interest: 

July 1, 1978 June 30, 1979 580.07 4,888.07 



Less Appropriations Authorized: 

Snow and Ice Removal 16,765.88 

Highway Dept. - Wages 5,495.98 

Balance June 30, 1979 



22.261.86 



22.261.86 



.00 



Changes In Surplus Revenue 
For The Year Ending June 30, 1979 

Balance July 1. 1978 $1,078,227.02 

Deduct: 

Art. 8 STM 2 1 79 27.550.06 

Art. 9 ATM 1979 100,000.00 

Audit Adjustments 3,329.25 130,879.31 







947,347.71 


Add: 






Tax Titles 


17.400.02 




Taxes in Litigation 


4,456.82 




Recovery of Previously Abated 






Taxes Chap. 41A 


2,516.40 




Excess 1979 RE & PP 






Commitments 


25.59 




Omitted 1979 Assessments 


1.848.63 




Unexpended Appropriation 






Balances 


331,416.78 




Excess Revenues: 






Local Receipts (Recap Sheet) 


787,039.92 




B.'C Dividend 


61,392.00 




Reimbursement Flood Relief 






Board 


50,396.18 




County Dog Fund Grant 


3.878.36 




Misc. Other 


48,579.08 




Unclaimed Performance Bonds 


1,210.00 




State Cherry Sheet 


255,019.73 


1,565.179.51 


Balance June 30. 1979 




2,512,527.22 



Surplus Revenue Restricted 
To Reduce 1980 Tax Rate 

Surplus Revenue Unrestricted 



823,679.00 
1,688,848.22 

2.512,527.22 



DISBURSEMENTS 



1978 



General Government: 
Moderator 
Selectmen 
Accounting 
Treasurer/Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Public Buildings 
Law 

Elections 
Registrars 
Finance Committee 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Personnel Board 
Town Forest Committee 
Conservation Commission 
Historical Commission 
Historic District Commission 
Constable 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 
Council on Aging 
Town Celebration Committee 
Town Aide 

Total General Government 

Public Safety: 

Police Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
Purchase Cruisers 
Mutual Aid 
Consultant 

Total Police Department 

Fire Department: 
Salaries 

Expense and Outlay 
East Station Construction 

Total Fire Department 

Misc. Protection: 
Hydrant Services 
Tree Warden 
Insect Pest Control 
Building Inspector 
Wire Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Dog Officer 
Animal Inspector 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Civilian Defense 

Total Misc. Protection 

Public Health: 

Salaries & Expenses 
Mosquito - Aerial Spray 
Study Septagc Disposal 

Total Public Health 

Sewer Commission: 
Expenses 
Professional Fees 

Total Sewer Commission 



1979 



300.00 


300.00 


65,402.21 


67,951.08 


48,049.29 


47.906.34 


95,803.15 


114.326.08 


68,966.52 


74,367.59 


42.880.90 


48,304.79 


26,800.95 


46,060.64 


28,003.34 


30,947.36 


6.212.56 


17,605.74 


20.705.95 


23,231.21 


1,047.41 


791.76 


3,210.22 


5.954.95 


4,196.19 


4,685.37 


632.84 


745.55 


73.50 


80.00 


9,848.61 


12,747.99 


1,633.20 


1.526.84 


695.00 


699.97 


72.00 


120.00 


426.04 


437.75 


10,383.78 


13.184.32 


4,719.60 


4,768.83 


9,972.22 


11,075.78 


450,035.48 


527.819.94 


933,052.68 


1,037.291.71 


83.267.20 


107,943.38 


27,662.25 


37,560.00 


1,824.10 


3,481.58 


15,000.00 


- 


1.060,806.23 


1,186.276.67 


1.176,474.42 


1,247,261.45 


80,013.53 


92,725.15 


10,606.46 


5.144.76 


1,267,094.41 


1,345,131.36 


56,899.80 


60,700.00 


15,537.90 


15,864.60 


9,306.00 


20.351.29 


19.555.04 


31,457.58 


17,292.53 


21,106.48 


4,829.61 


4,768.44 


1.310.00 


1,685.00 


15.255.87 


16,840.63 


1,100.00 


1.100.00 


2,200.00 


2,000.00 


5.638.59 


5,748.13 


148.925.34 


181.622.15 


38,025.72 


52.284.96 


— 


8,000.00 


- 


1.625.00 


38.025.72 


61.909.96 


94.58 


441.34 


17.10 


5.122.99 


111.68 


5.564.33 



80 



Highway Department: 






Parks & Recreation: 






Administration 


32.600.38 


53.353.04 


Parks 


31.862.33 


33.368.69 


Engineers Fees 


9.970.64 


14.320.35 


Varney Playground 


5.138.84 


7,283.85 


Labor Men 


532.511.83 


523,064.98 


Recreation Commission 


110.723.67 


108,340.65 


Utilities - Materials Misc. 


205,991.05 


170.050.11 


East School 


7.264.28 


9.184.90 


Waste Collection 


58,605.05 


73,173.22 


Youth Center 


32,214.99 


30,720.96 


Stabilization Fund 


5.394.00 

238.704.87 

41.895.94 


10.000.00 

20.232.00 

178,056.52 

44.858.06 


Edwards Beach 
Total Parks & Recreation 


2,367.71 
189.571.82 




Machine Hire Other 
Snow & Ice 
Sidewalks 


188,899.05 








Chapter 90 - 












Maint. & Construction 


20.245.85 




Insurance: 






Chapter 825 Construction 


38.663.93 


37,709.16 


Property Liability & 






Chapter 1140 Construction 


57.202.02 


694.77 


All Types 


264.291.30 


215.726.85 


Purchase of Equipment 


96.687.06 


121.789.00 

4.672.82 

43,904.91 

1,295,878.94 


Chapter 32 B 
Total Insurance 

Cemeteries: 


293,957.35a323.471.70 
558,248.65 




Warning & Regulatory Signs 
Drainage Construction 


539,198.55 






Total Highway Department 


1,338.472.62 




Street Lighting 


66.897.55 


80,163.98 


Salaries 

Internments 

Labor for Lot Owners 

Repairs, Expense & Outlays 

Restore Old Cemeteries 

Beautification 

Improv. & Devcl. Fund 

Purchase Equipment 

Total Cemeteries 


59,689.52 
5 000 00 


66,477.60 
4 772 94 


Veterans Benefits: 
Salaries & Expenses 
Cash & Material Grants 


13.489.00 
73.088.17 

86,577.17 


24.938.31 
59.411.82 


1.000.00 
13.245.55 
1.500.00 
4,790.42 
7.685.43 


1.000.00 

16.346.01 

1.500.00 


Total Veterans Benefits 


84.350.13 


5.331.57 


Schools: 

School Committee 


36,727.52 
267,743.81 


39.298.40 
305,898.91 


25,403.00 


92.910.92 


120,831.12 


Sup't. Office 






Supervision 


256.756.24 


256,000.23 


Unclassified: 






Principals 


597,763.45 


674,577.03 


Memorial Day 


1,430.95 


1,495.20 


Teachers 


7.365,270.30 


7,830.124.44 


Town Clock 


384.99 


329.51 


Textbooks 


123,785.80 


134,830.43 


Ambulance Service 


1,666.67 


1.00 


Library 


234,330.48 


270,899.00 


Town & Fin Com Reports 


6,462.35 


6.446.50 


Audio Visual 


103,604.19 


118,392.60 


Unpaid Bills Prior Years 


39,135.54 


- 


Guidance 


346,238.49 


378,899.07 


Regional Drug Program 


23,736.96 


23.736.96 


Attendance 


17,999.80 


19,999.98 


Crystal Lake Restoration 


152,569.15 


- 


Health Services 


88,429.83 


103.815.64 


Mental Health Program 


8,695.00 


8,695.00 


Transportation 


683,426.54 


715,018.94 


Elder Services of Mcrr. Valley 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 


Food Services 


54,138.62 


65,798.24 


Central Sq. Eng. Fees 


620.92 


1,964.39 


Athletics 


111,834.21 


133,908.52 


Bus Trans Subsidy 


29.978.04 


27,999.96 


Student Activities 


26,037.46 


37,019.90 


NMAC Assessment 


8,592.00 


8.592.00 


Custodial 


649,082.86 


686,759.76 


Aerial Mapping 


73,987.00 


— 


Utilities 


581,015.54 


582,660.89 


Sr. Citizen Drop-In Center 


36,937.52 


7,029.20 


Maint. of Grounds 


22,812.20 


42,894.89 


Landfill Development 


10,280.93 


9,574.25 


Maint. of Buildings 


68,812.56 


83,017.71 


Storm Damage 


9.991.80 




Maint. of Equipment 


54,033.53 


83.843.57 


Salt Storage Shed 


40.00 


3,881.88 


Adult Education 


20,456.66 


20.405.32 


Conservation Com. — 






Civic Activities 


13,114.68 


13.573.42 


Consultant 


5,000.00 


11,000.00 


Program W 'O Schools 


8.750.00 


10.917.50 


D.P.W. Consultant 


12,000.00 


- 


Career Education 


37.723.70 


36.722.23 


Traffic Control 






Chapter 766 


908,493.65 


1,273.828.76 


Chelmsford St. 


— 


300.00 


Total School Department 


12.678,382.12 


13,919,105.38 


Unemployment Benefits 
Purchase Land — 

Conservation 
Land Appraisal - Swain Rd. 
Insurance Consultant 
Plans LaFayette Terrace 
Appraiser - Graniteville Rd. 


- 


14,860.68 


School Revolving Funds: 
Cafeteria 
Athletics 
Title I 
Title IV 


624,680.80 
12.514.17 
85,545.12 
73.391.27 
24,638.51 
117.08 


646,709.20 
23,838.04 

108,848.96 
49 364 25 


81,500.00 

450.00 

5.000.00 

1.200.00 

995.00 


Title VI 


96,559.08 


Total Unclassified 


423,309.82 


216.851.53 


Distributive Ed. 






Gifted & Talented 
C.E.T.A. Projects 


4,837.50 
1,850.29 

827,574.54 


1.924.70 


Agency, Trust & Investment: 
Fees & Licenses - 
State & County 


21,579.70 
4.247.437.34 




Total Revolving Funds 


927,244.23 


19.017.00 
4.982.260.12 








Payroll Deductions 


Regional Vocational School 


425,454.00 


497,716.23 


Retirement - Pension 












Expense 


425,866.97 


433,649.70 








Libraries: 






State & County Assessments 


893.365.61 


561,500.38 


Salaries 


148,209.60 


157,372.20 


Cemetery PC Bequests 


13,035.00 


14,615.00 


Repairs & Maint. 


3,494.14 


3,636.37 


Tax Levy Refunds 


180,538.76 


87,568.13 


Fuel, Light & Water 


12,550.79 


14.057.13 


Performance Bonds 


3,250.00 


5,053.00 


Books & Periodicals 


50,116.11 


54,995.16 


Misc. Trust Funds 


1,476.04 


9,323.57 


Other Expenses 


7,999.02 


8,585.00 


Water District Liens 


8,918.57 


10.972.19 


Outlays 


2.148.92 


2,909.09 


Police Outside Detail 


85,817.24 


71,944.37 


Video Tape Project 


5,291.05 


503.75 


Merrimack Education Center 


626,666.73 


98.206.03 


Carriage House 




17,247.41 


Total Agency, Trust & 
Investment 






Total Libraries 


229,809.63 


259,306.11 


6,507,951.96 


6,294.109.49 



81 



Interest - Loans: 
Anticipation Loans 
Bonded Debt 

Total Interest 

Principal Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenue 
Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Maturing Bonded Debt 

Total Principal 

School Construction 

Total Disbursements 

Cash Balance On Hand June 30 

Total 



37.148.55 
434.602.50 

471.751.05 



37.308.11 
364.392.50 

401.700.61 



5.000.000.00 4,500.000.00 

200,000.00 34,214.00 

1,695,000.00 1,644.214.00 

6,178,428.00 



6,895.000.00 


67,214.57 


33,824,125.28 
2.709,546.78 


36,533,672.06 



127.716.14 



34.439.823.90 
4.222,483.68 

38.662,307.58 



RECEIPTS 



1978 



General Revenue 



Taxes: 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Farm Animal Excise 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Title Redemptions 

Lieu of Taxes State Property 

Lieu of Taxes Veterans 

Abatements 
Elderly Exemption 

Total Taxes 

Fines & Permits: 
Court Fines 

Permits, Fees & Licenses 
Alcoholic Licenses 

Total Fines & Permits 

Grants and Gifts: 
County: 
Dog Fund 

Total Grants From Countv 

Federal Government: 
Public Law 874 
Revenue Sharing Funds 
Antirecession Fiscal Assistance 
Com. Devel. Program H.U.D. 
Snow Removal Reimbursement 

Total Grants From Fed'l Gov't 

State: 

Aid To Education 

School Building Assistance 

School Cafeteria 

Tuition & Trans, of State Wards 

School Transportation 

Aid To Public Libraries 

Highways Chapter 90 

Highways Chapter 81 

Highway & Transit Development 

Local Aid Fund 

Veterans Benefits 

Conservation Grant 

Crystal lake Reimbursement 

Library Video Tape Project 

Dept. of Elder Affairs 

School Programs: 
Title I 
Title IV 
Title VI 
Gifted & Talented 

Total Grants From State 



592.922.31 

15.185.508.90 

205.50 

1.388.773.08 

12.833.69 

4.324.32 

8.862.80 



1979 



587.011.36 

15.202.604.51 

731.25 

1.593.835.92 

16.637.20 

1.337.76 

8,711.75 

32.411.94 



17.193.430.60 17.446.281.69 



2.513.50 
77,321.10 
21.550.00 



60.504.47 
82.945.56 
26.275.00 



101.384.60 



169.725.03 



4.070.14 



3.878.36 



4,070.14 



3.878.36 



165.020.74 

471.660.00 

29.520.00 

30,000.00 

12.300.00 

708,500.74 



184.639.75 

465.010 00 

4.308.00 

4.000.00 

657.987.75 



2,968.439.35 


3.870.662.00 


1.006.729.44 


1.013.212.14 


165,507.05 


250.206.60 


33.346.00 


126.004.00 


220.270.00 


297.454.00 


11.905.88 


11.905.88 


23.636.62 




150.291.20 


I52.91S.00 


148.671.59 


148.672.00 


320,561.66 


503.621.23 


43.112.28 


31.698.10 


30.000.00 


8.750.00 


61.693.70 


64 180.01 


5.291.05 




2.000.00 


2.164.00 


84.685.00 


106.110.21 


55.644.79 


10.810.00 


23.900.00 


124.457.00 


5.071.50 


1.690.50 



Individuals: 

Library Carriage House 
Renovation Fund 

Total Gifts From Individuals 



Departmental Receipts 
Selectmen 

Treasurer & Collector 
Town Clerk 
Assessors 

Police Department 
Public Buildings 
Highway 
Dog Officer 
Fire Department 
Veterans Benefits 
Misc. Departments 
Sale of Town Property 
Glass Recycling 

School Department: 

Cafeteria - Lunch Sales 
Tuition Rents & Misc 
Athletic Programs 
Educational Collaborative Fund 



Library: 
Fines 

Cemeterv: 

Sale of Lots & Graves 
Internments, Labor. Material 
PC Bequests 



Total Departmental Receipts 

Municipal Indebtedness: 
Anticipation of Revenue 
Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Bond Issue Crystal Lake 
Bond Issue High School 

Interest: 
Taxes 
Deposits 

Federal Revenue Sharing 
Antirecession Fiscal Assistance 

Total From Loans & Interest 

Refunds 

Agency. Trust & Investment: 
Payroll Withholdings 
Cemeterv P C Interest 
Dog Licenses Due Countv 
Licenses Due State 
Barris Cemetery Fund 
Conservation Fund 
Douglas Cemeterv Fund 
Registry Fees Due State 
Library Trust Funds 
Cash In Lieu of Bonds 
Water District Liens 
Veterans Emergency Fund 
Sinking Fund 
Stabilization Fund 
Fish & Game Licenses Due State 
Police Outside Detail 
Merrimack Education Center 

Total Agency. Trust & Investment 

Total Receipts 

Cash Balance On Hand Julv 1 

Total 



14,400.17 



6.231 17 



14,400.17 



313.76 

11.672.45 

628.70 

108.50 

9.357.08 

2,586.01 

6.480.37 



4.383.66 

94,183.97 

660.00 

756.15 



131.130.65 

121 410.76 

26,797.65 

11.768.04 

6.803.00 

469.779.45 

5.473.19 

6.390.00 
16.773.50 
13.035.00 

36.198.50 

642.581.79 



5.000,000.00 
134.214.00 
100.000 00 



31.292.90 

65.715.67 

26.121.07 

3.760.84 

5.361.104.48 
17.178.20 



4.225.280.54 

13.613.08 

6.972.10 

950.00 

5.440.00 

3.604.23 

1.063.00 

1.160.53 

1.500.00 

8.013.87 

250.00 

60.000.00 

35.020 06 

11.660.25 

90.835.91 

31 4.523.17 

4.779.886.74 

34.183.294.57 
2.350.377.49 



6,231.17 



16.873.42 

10.266 07 

1.023.75 

105.00 

11.374.05 

6,947.99 

3.725.50 

760.00 

1.925.47 

91.585.17 
121.025.00 

268.611.42 

402.443.36 
29.128 17 
23.565 73 
22.400.00 

477.537.56 

1.807.30 

8 190.00 
11.728.25 
14.615.00 

37.533.25 

788.489.53 



4.500.000.00 

31 214.00 

100.000.00 

53.839.00 

124.534.07 

72.203.32 

580.07 

1.885.370.46 
8.525.78 



4.983.469.22 

10 .000.00 

6.520.55 

500.00 

725.00 

52.190.00 

5.405 27 

885.00 

8.691.78 

6.122.00 

1 1 .188.16 

118 12 

7.530.00 
10 791.35 
67.963.91 

89.000.00 

5.261.100.36 

35.952.760.80 

2.709 516.78 



5.360.757.11 



6.721.870.67 



36.533.672 06 38.662.307.58 



82 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 



Local Inspector 

Bruce H. Clark 



Senior Clerk 

Catherine R. Curran 



The following is a report of the Building Inspection 
Dept. for year 1979. 

THE TYPES OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED 
ARE LISTED BELOW 



No. 




Est. Value 


199 


Dwellings 


$6,788,900. 


119 


Wood Burning Stoves 


60,674. 


125 


Addicions 


687,071. 


36 


Swimming Pools 


128,141. 


12 


Utility Sheds 


15,300. 


21 


Signs 


13,538. 


10 


Commercial Bldgs. 


1,794,300. 


2 


Barns 


1,500. 


46 


Garages 


349,600. 


4 
16 

4 


Demolitions 
Foundations 
Misc. 






87,437. 


5 


Framings 


115,500. 


12 


Commercial remodeling 


585,800. 


411 


Permits issued with estimated value 


$10,627,761. 



Amount of Salary Appropriation 
for Zoning Bylaw Officer and 
Inspector of Buildings $18,945 

Amount received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Building Permits 30,330 

Amounts received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Yard Sales 1,225 

Amount received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Occupancy Permits 550 

Amount received by the Town of 
Chelmsford for Certificate of Inspections 850 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Total Fees Received - 1979 Total 

Inspector of Buildings -Building Permits $30,330.00 

— Certificates of Insp. 850.00 

— Certificates of Occup. 550.00 
-Yard Sales 1,225.00 



Plumbing Inspector 

Wire Inspector 
Gas Inspector 



— Plumbing Permits 

— Hot Water Tanks 



$32,955.00 

$ 2,210.00 

1,821.00 



— Wire Permits 

— Gas Permits 
Total: 



$4,031.00 

$ 6,797.00 

$ 5,381.00 
$49,164.00 



Total Building Departments Budget 1979-1980 

Building Inspector's Department $39,820.85 

Gas Piping & Fixture Department 7 , 745 . 1 9 

Wire Inspector's Department 21 ,432.73 

TOTAL: $68,998.77 

Total Cost to Operate Building Department $19,825.77 

THE BUILDING DEPARTMENT 
BUDGET BREAK DOWN 



Building Inspector's Department: 

Building Inspector's Salary 
Transportation Expense 
Office Expense 
Out of Town Expense 
Local Inspector's Salary 
Sr. Clerk's Salary 



$18,173.00 
1,720.38 
3,378.62 
492.55 
6,225.00 
9,831.30 





$39,820.85 


Wire Inspector's Department: 




Wire Inspector's Salary 
Vacation & Sickness (severance) 
Transportation 
Office Expense 
Out of Town 


$15,398.40 

3,210.50 

1,798.94 

933.27 

91.62 




$21,432.73 


Gas & Piping Fixtures Department: 




Gas Inspector's Salary 
Transportation Expense 
Office Expense 
Out of Town Expense 
Plumbing Inspector's Salary 


3,875.02 
561.16 
447.01 


2,862.00 



$ 7,745.19 



Duties added through State Mandated Duties: 

A. B. A. (Architectural Barrier Board) 

Heat Energy 

Article Two, State Sanitary Code 



Respectfully submitted, 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 
Inspector of Buildings 



PLUMBING DEPARTMENT 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
From: William Shedd, Plumbing Inspector 

This being the fourth year that the Plumbing Inspector 
has been transferred from the Board of Health to the 
Building Inspector's Office continues to make an efficient 
operation. 

The Plumbing Inspector, Gas Inspector, Wire Inspec- 
tor and Building Inspector's work is very closely related; 
therefore the expenses are reduced considerably. 



83 



I thank all the Inspectors, the townspeople and other 
departments for their cooperation. 

For the year 1979 there were 527 plumbing permits 
issued to do the plumbing work. Of this number 483 were 
for Hot Water Tanks and new construction. 44 Renova- 
tions. It took 645 inspections to complete work. 

Respectfully submitted 

William Shedd 
Plumbing Inspector 



GAS INSPECTOR 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
From: Neal Stanley, Gas Inspector 

Again 1979 has proven to be an eventful year with all 
the Inspectors in the same office. My position as Gas In- 
spector has been made more efficient which means a 
more efficient department for the Town of Chelmsford. 
Added State requirements have increased my duties. 

There were 575 gas permits issued in 1979. 

I wish to thank all the people and departments that 
have cooperated so much to make this department what 
it is. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neal Stanley 
Gas Inspector 



WIRE INSPECTOR 

To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen 
From: Francis E. Cunningham, Wire Inspector 

Since becoming Wire Inspector on May 31, 1979 there 
were 463 wiring permits issued: 

288 permits for dwellings, remodeling or additions 
132 permits for fire alarms 

43 permits for Commercial & Industrial Building 
or additions 

In addition to above, inspections were made of ground 
rods installed because plastic pipe was installed replacing 
copper pipe for water service. 

Before May 31, there were 188 permits issued. Total 
permits for year was 651. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Francis E. Cunningham 
Wire Inspector 



No. Reg. H'way 


No. Reg. Waste 


Employees 


Col. Employees 


21 


3 


27 


13 


37 


16 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the Highway Department 
for the year 1979: 



Year 

1955 
1966 
1979 



The following streets were accepted at the Annual 
Town Meeting: 

Wagontrail Road Ext. 
Lovett Lane 
Lafayette Terrace 

Spring Clean Up Days were conducted during the week 
of April 30 through May 4 and Fall Clean Up Days were 
conducted during the week of October 17 through Oc- 
tober 21. The town has continued with the monthly 
pickup of papers. 

Drainage projects constructed by Highway Department 
Personnel include the following: 

Grove Street & Perham St. - 348 feet - 18" R.C. pipe, 3 
catch basins, 3 manholes installed. Roadway excavated, 
gravelled and oiled. 

Montview Road - 125 feet - 12" steel pipe. 

Ruthellen Road - 52 feet - 12" steel pipe. 

High Street - 239 feet - 10" steel coated pipe, 3 catch 
basins, one manhole installed. 

Byam Road - 52 feet - 12" R.C. pipe, 1 catch basin in- 
stalled. 

Mill Road - 28 feet - 12" steel coated pipe. 

Westford Street - 292 feet - 12" steel coated pipe, one 
manhole installed, Area hot topped, berm installed. 

Glen Ave. - 30 feet - 12" steel coated pipe. 

Warren Ave. @ Chatham Rd. - 10 feet - 8" steel coated 
pipe, one catch basin installed. 

Dalton Road (Little) - 75 feet - 12" R.C. pipe, 2 catch 
basins, one manhole installed. 

Sands Place & Hugo Lane - 111 feet - 18" steel pipe, 1 
catch basin installed, one catch basin rebuilt. 

Ideal Ave. - Leaching area built, one catch basin in- 
stalled. 

Wotton Street (at dam) - 20 feet - 24" steel pipe install- 
ed. 

Drainage projects designed by Fleming, Bienvenu & 
Associates, Consultants to the Highway Department and 
awarded to contractors for construction were completed 
in 1979: 



Jessie Road 

Lauderdale Road, Gail Street, Warren Ave. 

Luan Circle 
Longview Drive 
Bridge Street 
Bartlett Street 
Southgate Road 



and 



84 



A bituminous concrete surface was installed on West- 
ford Street from Route 495 bridge overpass to Abbott 
Lane. 

New equipment approved and purchased for the High- 
way Department are as follows: (3) Waste Collection 
Trucks; (1) Sweeper Broom; (2) Dump Bodies. 

A salt storage shed was erected at the Swain Road land- 
fill area by the Commonwealth of Mass., Department of 
Public Works and is presently being used for storing salt. 

The usual oiling of streets, including mix-in-places, 
brush cutting, fabricating, replacing and installing street 
signs, painting traffic lines, cleaning catch basins, 
rebuilding and repairing sunken catch basins, sanding, 
snow plowing and snow removal, sweeping streets, drain- 
age and general maintenance was performed throughout 
the year. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their kind con- 
sideration and cooperation and the Police Department 
for notifying the department of dangerous road condi- 
tions during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis Rondeau 
Supt. of Streets 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Ma. 

Dear Board Members, 

I hereby submit my report of the Fire Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1979. 

The major problem facing the fire service today is the 
energy crisis. The cost of heating five stations and supply- 
ing fuel for fourteen pieces of equipment is a drain on the 
budget. Also, the improper installation of wood burning 
stoves and the illegal and improper storage of gasoline 
cause the most serious problems that we are faced with at 
this time. 

This year the Fire Department recommends that we 
replace a 1957 pumper. 

I wish to express my thanks to all town officials and 
employees for the excellent cooperation given to the fire 
department during the past year, and again like to con- 
gratulate and thank the men of the department for conti- 
nuing to maintain the high standard of courage and 
ability that has been shown in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 























Frederick H. Reid 


























Fire Chief 






CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE 1979 














Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Vehicle Accident 


5 


7 


5 


7 


6 


3 


4 


1 


9 


4 


1 


7 


Brush 


5 


8 


66 


59 


35 


22 


28 


2 


2 


14 


24 


14 


Building 


9 


19 


4 


5 


8 


6 


5 


12 


8 


6 


5 


11 


Dump 

















2 




















False-Malicious 


9 


1 


6 


5 


6 


4 


2 


3 


4 


7 


4 


8 


False-Accidental 


7 


6 


7 


5 


4 


7 


5 


4 


10 


5 


7 


2 


Miscellaneous 


49 


33 


18 


31 


26 


35 


34 


30 


26 


42 


22 


29 


Lock-out 





2 


2 


2 


2 


6 


1 


1 





3 


1 


3 


Medical Assistance 


27 


11 


9 


18 


21 


19 


16 


21 


13 


18 


18 


17 


Vehicle 


6 


5 


8 


8 


7 


9 


13 


9 


9 


4 


4 


2 


Mutual Aid 


4 


4 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


2 


2 


Total = (1278) 


121 


96 


123 


142 


116 


115 


109 


86 


82 


105 


88 


95 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

PERSONNEL 

Fire Chief 
Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 
Edward G. Quinn 

Captains 



Allen C. Mello(Retired) 
Thomas P. Miskell (Acting) 
Charles S. Galloway, Jr. 



James M. Spinney 

RonaldJ. Sawicki 

Ronald O. Wikander 



85 



Firefighters 



Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr. 
Charles Ferreira 
Robert K. Adams 
Alvin F. Wetmore 
JackD. Hadley 
Harvey M. Miller 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T. Wetherbee 
FrancisJ. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Robert L. Huges 
ThomasJ. Curran 
James P. Flaherty 
Joseph F. Lynch 
Paul D. Hayes 
Terrance A. Goode 
William H. Hadley 
Leo A. Martin 
Emil P. Magiera 



Secretary 

Mary Ann Koulas 



Philip Dube 

Joseph E. Staveley 

John P. DePalma 

Walter F. Adley, Jr. 

Dennis Vargeletis 

Richard L. Grenon 

Ronald L.Johnson 

Wallace V. Maybury.Jr. 

William V.Cady, Jr. 

James A. Sousa 

William F. Curran 

Daniel T. Reid 

JosephJ. Spinazola 

Michael McTeague 

Ernest J. Frobese 

James P. Curran 

Charles A. Schramm 

Peter C. Johnson 

William M. Burke, Jr. 

EdwardJ. Nolet 

Michael F. Curran 

Michael D. Ridlon 

William H. Jamer 

Raymond R. Kydd 

James Boermeester 

William Dalton 

Thomas D. Miskell 

David Gelineau 

Brian J. Stanton (Prov.) 

Mechanic 

Jack Smith 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Board of Selectmen 

Town Hall 

North Road 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 01824 

Dear Board Members: 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the Fiscal year 1979. 

At the present time the department is made up of 51 
permanent men. 

Acting Chief of Police 
James C. Greska 

Acting Deputy Chief of Administration 

Walter W. Edwards, Jr. 

Acting Deputy Chief of Operations 

ArmandJ. Caron 



Leslie A. Adams 
Pennryn D. Fitts 
JohnJ. Mack 
William R. McAllister 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
JohnJ. Bell 
Mark L. Burlamachi 
Robert M. Burns 
Steven A. Burns 
David C. Campbell 
Lance Cunningham 
Patrick W. Daley 
Bruce A. Darwin 
Frederick G. Dillon 
JohnJ. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
BlairJ. Finnegan 
Joseph R. Gamache 
John G. Harrington 
Charles D. Harvey 
JamesJ. Kerrigan 

Ernest 



Sergeants 

(Acting) Raymond G. McCusker 

Raymond McKeon 

Phillip N. Molleur 

(Acting) John O. Walsh 

Patrolmen 

Ronald A. Leach 

Roland E. Linstad 

Russell H. Linstad 

Henry R. McEnany 

James F. Midgley 

Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

Timothy F. O'Connor 

Robert A. Popplewell 

John E. Redican 

Francis X. Roark 

Edward C. Rooney 

Michael E. Rooney 

John B. Sousa 

William A. Strobel, Jr. 

Robert J. Trudell 

DanielJ. Walsh 

Eugene W. Walsh 

William B. Walsh 

R. Woessner, Jr. 



86 



Intermittent Patrolmen 
Francis M. Conlon John M. McGeown, Jr. 

James T.H. Finnegan James F. Palmer 

Jared Finnegan Chandler Robinson 

William J. Floyd William R. Ryder 

Francis P. Kelly Michael W. Stott 



Police Matrons 



Grace Auger 
Nora Clifford 



Mary Long 
Emily Peake 



Senior Clerks 

Patricia A. Caparella Nora F. Clifford 

Pauline B. Gervais 



Irene McHugh 



Sandra Spence 



Junior Clerks 

Custodian 

John P. Curran 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1978 1979 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 15,146 16,368 

Summons Served 1,554 3,023 

Licenses Suspended 53 29 

Accidents Reported 1 ,430 1 ,328 

Personal Injuries Reported .... 312 284 

Fatal Accidents 1 4 

Mileage of Cruisers 436,243 415,778 

Special Property Checks 

Station Lockups 487 513 

Citations Issued 3,541 3,667 

Parking Violations 638 327 

Doors and Windows found open . . 189 177 

Detoxification Unit 335 364 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

1978 1979 

Photocopying Machine $3,470.00 $3,884.00 

Firearm Permits 2,030.00 3,154.00 

Bicycle Registrations 50.25 39.00 

Firearm Identification Cards .... 457.00 550.00 

Court Fines 2,153.50 125,066.47 

Photographs 386.00 582.00 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 3,767.69 2,822.05 

ARRESTS 

Crimes Against Persons 335 

Crimes Against Property 167 

Crimes Against Public Order 1,927 



DISPOSITION OF CASES IN 1979 

Fined 1,589 

Placed on Probation 91 

Suspended Sentence and placed on Probation 9 

Placed on file 97 

Not Guilty Finding 7 

Dismissed with Probable Cause for Arrest 53 



Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued 

Without a Finding 117 

Committed to Youth Service Board 9 

Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 2 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 7 

Turned over to other out of town Police Depts. 

and Courts , 146 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 220 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 83 

This past year has been an unusual year for the 
Chelmsford Police Department. Beginning with the 
retirement of Chief Robert E. Germann on January 11, 
1979 after 20 years with the Chelmsford Police Depart- 
ment and almost 10 years as its Chief of Police. On 
January 12, 1979 Acting Deputy Chief James C. Greska 
was appointed Acting Chief of Police and also Sergeant 
Walter W. Edwards, Jr. was appointed Acting Deputy 
Chief of Administration. On February 21, 1979 Sergeant 
Armand J. Caron was appointed Acting Deputy Chief of 
Operations. Sergeant Raymond McKeon was named Ac- 
ting Prosecutor to the Lowell District Court and Acting 
Sergeant Raymond McCusker was placed in charge of the 
Criminal Bureau. This year we have also had two (2) 
patrolmen retire. Officer Edwin R. Hodgson retired on 
June 3, 1979 after 19 years on the Chelmsford Police 
Department. Officer Howard R. Ubele retired on Oc- 
tober 31, 1979 after 8 years on the Chelmsford Police 
Department. Officer John O. Walsh was promoted to Ac- 
ting Police Sergeant. 

The Police Department continues to implement the 
recommendations of the Police Management Study that 
had been conducted the previous year. This process will 
continue well into 1980. 

Four Police Officers graduated from the Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice Council's Basic Recruit course. They 
were Frank Roark, who ranked first in academic work in 
the class; Bruce Darwin, who ranked third; and David 
Campbell and Robert Burns. 

A new motorcycle with radar and radio was given to 
the Police Department under the Governor's Highway 
Safety Act. The total cost of this equipment was $7,500. 

Officer Patrick Daley was appointed Community Ser- 
vices Officer in the Police Department. His duties include 
school safety, public information and assisting the Depu- 
ty Chief in charge of Administration. It is hoped that 
with this appointment the public will be better informed 
of the Department's activities and he will be able to 
develop and maintain relationships with individuals and 
organizations within the Town and the Greater Lowell 
area that can serve the Town and the people of Chelms- 
ford. 

Officer Russell Linstad was appointed as the Juvenile 
Officer. This appointment enables the Chelmsford Police 
Department to assist the parents in attempting to help the 
juvenile adjust better to whatever his or her problem 
might be and make referrals to social service agencies 
for counseling or other services. He will work in conjunc- 
tion with the Deputy Chief of Operations. 



87 



Officer Charles Harvey was appointed as the Crime 
Prevention Officer to work in cooperation with the Depu- 
ty Chief of Operations on a program of Crime Prevention 
throughout the community. Because of this appointment 
the "Operation Property ID" program was reinstated. 
Also, due to this appointment numerous "Neighborhood 
Watch" meetings were conducted throughout the com- 
munity resulting in a a marked decrease in housebreaks. 
Officer Harvey also has initiated the Alcohol Abuse Pro- 
gram throughout the community. This appointment will 
bring the Police and the Community much closer to- 
gether in the overall crime fighting effort. 

New traffic laws have been approved by the Attorney 
General and the Police Department began a vigorous en- 
forcement of the law concerning fire lanes. Better than 
300 vehicles were towed in the first two months. 

Five (5) additional hand held radars were purchased 
for the Police Department this year to help better control 
speeding throughout the Town of Chelmsford. More 
motor vehicle citations were written in 1979 than in any 
time in the Department's history. 

A new policy was initiated whereby cruisers were pur- 
chased through the Greater Boston Police Council pur- 
chasing pool. By this action the Chelmsford Police 
Department was able to save almost $6,000.00. 

At the present time, 18 members of the Chelmsford 
Police Department have received college degrees to date; 
and 20 additional officers are presently enrolled in degree 
courses in area colleges and universities. 

In a continuing effort to upgrade the quality of Police 
service to the Town of Chelmsford many officers attended 
specialized training schools to increase their expertise in 
the law enforcement field. 

Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council: 

Hostage Management Training School 6 men 

Breathalyzer Training School 2 men 

Criminal Offenders Record School 2 men 

Fingerprint School 4 men 

Radio Dispatch Training School 13 men 

Rape Investigation Training School 4 men 

Sexual Assault Seminar 3 men 

Juvenile Officer Training School 1 man 

Mental Health and the Law Training School 4 men 

Crime Prevention Oficers Training School 1 man 

Labor Relations and Contract Interpretation 

School 1 man 

Child Abuse and Neglect Seminar 2 men 

Basic Skills for Youth Service Supervisor School ... 1 man 

Effects of Cannabis Abuse School 1 man 

Introduction to Psychopathology and Criminal 

School 2 men 

Advanced Investigative Techniques School 1 man 

Drug Abuse: Enforcement Law and Order Procedure 

Training School 1 man 

Burglary Reduction-Security Surveys of Residences 

and Small Businesses Training School 1 man 

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation School 1 man 

Effective Delegation of Authority Training School . 3 men 



Communicating in the Criminal Justice System 

School 3 men 

Racial Attitudes and Job Performance School .... 1 man 

Police Civil Liberties School 4 men 

Search and Seizure Training 2 men 

Budget Justification and Formulation 2 men 

Techniques for State and County Schools 2 men 

Criminal Law Update Seminar 1 man 

New England Institute of Law Enforcement 

Management 1 man 

(Babson College) 

Education will continue to be a prime goal of our 
Department during 1980. 

In conclusion I would like to offer my sincere apprecia- 
tion and thanks to the Board of Selectmen, various of- 
ficials and department heads, especially the two (2) 
Deputy Chiefs, the Sergeants and the Patrolmen and also 
the citizens of the Town for their continued help and 
cooperation. 

Sincerely, 

James C. Greska 
Acting Chief of Police 



ANIMAL INSPECTORS REPORT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Dear Board; 

The following is the Animal Inspectors report for the 
year 1979: 



Number of dog bites 
Number of cattle 
Number of horses 
Number of swine 
Number of sheep 
Number of goats 



62 
191 

71 
314 

18 
4 

Respectfully submitted, 

Martin A. Gruber D.V.M. 



88 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Charles Higgins, Chairman 
Carolyn Bennett, Vice Chairman 



The breakdown on hours for 1979 is as follows: Duty — 
4,883 hours, Training — 1,040 hours, Work Projects — 
426 hours for a total of 6,349 man hours. 



Daniel Burke 
Marshall Arkin 
Florence Kelley 



Alternates 

Denis Valdinocci 

Michael Erhartic 

Joe Dappal 



The Board heard 78 cases and dispensed with them as 
follows: eighteen were denied, fifty-three were granted 
and seven were withdrawn. 

The Board would like to take this opportunity to thank 
Town Boards, employees and committees for their 
assistance in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles Higgins 
Chairman 

REPORT OF THE AUXILIARY POLICE 

1979 

Director 

Walter W. Edwards, Jr. Deputy Chief (Acting) 

Coordinator 

Basil Larkin, Sergeant (Retired) 

During 1979 the Auxiliary Police participated in four- 
teen events, search, bike-a-thons, road races, parades, Ju- 
ly 4th festivities, dog show, plane mishap, Halloween 
school duty, as well as assisting the JayCee's Haunted 
House and the Girl Scouts Spook House. 

Operation House Check worked 192 nights checking 
5,298 homes and doing 1700 school checks; as well as 
assisting the Regulars at numerous accidents, fires and 
other activities. A total of 19,400 miles was logged on the 
auxiliary cruiser with a total of 2,456 man hours. 

Training activities for the year consisted of re-certifica- 
tion on Cardio- Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for the 
unit, upgraded retro training in the various police pro- 
cedures necessary. 

The work project consisted of building repairs, pain- 
ting the exterior and the complete re-wiring of our 
Emergency Van as well as the repairs and servicing of our 
vehicles. 

The Auxiliary sponsored an Explorer Post 370 for teen- 
agers interested in Emergency Services and disaster 
related services. The post currently has fifteen (15) 
members. 

Our thanks and appreciation to the Officers and Men 
of the Police Dept. for their support and invaluable 
assistance. 



ROSTER 



Emil Aberizk 
Lloyd Anstey 
William Arsenault 
Ken Berger 
Sherwin Borden 
Craig Brigham 
George Brown 
Paul Dean 
Richard Demers 
Douglas Drobnis 
James Ernst 
Leroy Fielding 
Roger Gregoire 
Alan Grekula 
Anne Gerkula 



John Hartnett 

William Keenan 

Costos Kevghas 

Richard Meaney 

Frederic Mehan 

Edward Norton 

Bruce Pemberton 

Bradford Poole 

James Quinn 

David Ramsay 

D. Scot Ringerson 

R. Duncan Smith 

Michael Taplin 

Paul Villare 

Karen Wharton 



CABLE TV ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

During 1979 the Cable TV Advisory Committee moved 
from a dormant to a very active role. With the advent of 
cable television in Lowell, and a rising interest among 
townspeople, the Committee developed guidelines for the 
solicitation of bids from cable television and under a new 
Chairman, Ford D. Cavallari, presented a recommenda- 
tion to the Board of Selectmen to solicit bids. 

As of the end of the year, the Cable TV Advisory Com- 
mittee is reviewing the preliminary proposals of two bid- 
ders and preparing '.'Notes for Bidders" to be used in sub- 
mitting final/amended proposals for the consideration of 
the Committee and the Board of Selectmen. 

Richard Arcand 

Ford D. Cavallari 

Harold Witt 

Robert Brooks 

Stan Norkunas 

Richard St. Marie 

Paul M. Harkins 

Joseph A. Roark 

Charles B. Marcella, III 

Chris Tournas 

(Non-voting School Dept. Rep.) 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 



Dana Caffelle 
Raymond Day 



James K. Gifford 
Charles Marderosian 



As in past years the Town Celebrations Committee, has 
been active in making preparations for the annual Fourth 
of July Celebration in Chelmsford. We must once again 
compliment the Chelmsford Minutemen Coordinating 
Committee for their planning and administration of the 
1979 Celebration, the County Fair on the Common, the 
Band Concerts the Square Dancing attended by several 
hundreds on the evening of July 3rd. The July 4th Grand 
Parade attended by many thousands of people through 
out the area. 



89 



Many thanks to the Recreation Commission for the 
successful Road Races, the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks for 
the gigantic fireworks display, the Chelmsford Art Society 
for the Art Festival. 

The Committee acknowledges the efforts of the person 
nel of the Police, Fire, Public Works and Park Depart- 
ment for their assistance and cooperation during the 1979 
Celebration, also special thanks to the volunteers of the 
Chelmsford Auxiliary Police. 

The Committee is now underway making preparations 
for the 1980 Fourth of July Celebration, which is the 
325th Anniversary of the founding of the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 

CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 
George J. Brown William W. Edge 

Melvin P. Dejager Walter W. Edwards 

George R. Dixon Donald Savage 

Raymond Day Joseph E. Staveley 

The Office of Emergency Preparedness, Civil Defense 
Committee, meets regularly on the second Tuesday 
of each month, to prepare all necessary reports and 
papers for the State and Federal Civil Defense Agencies 
for the town to be eligible for surplus equipment at the 
Taunton Surplus Property Depot. 

The Communications Center participate in monthly 
drills with the Mass. Area 1 CD. Headquarters in Tewks 
bury and other cities and town Emergency Operating 
Centers. 

The Town Emergency Operation Center in Town Hall 
was activated, Jan. 25th, following a State of Emergency 
declared by the Board of Selectmen, as a result of ex 
cessive flooding of Central Square and many streets in the 
town. All department heads and personnel are to be com- 
plimented for their excellent response and cooperation 
during the period of the Emergency. 

The Auxiliary Police volunteers have been most effec- 
tive, during the State of Emergency, the Vacation House 
Check and the various celebrations in the Town. 

I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, the Adminis- 
trative Assistant, all department heads and personnel in 
the town for their cooperation received this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 

Director 

CHELMSFORD COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging had another busy 
year in 1979, aiming to expand services and implement 
new programs in order to assist the increasing number of 
older residents. The following report highlights the ser- 
vices which were made available during 1979: 



Senior Citizen Drop In Center 

1979 marked the first full year of operation of the 
Center and a most successful one. Approximately 150 
seniors 'drop in' in an average week to participate in arts 
and crafts, exercise, health programs, cards, bingo or just 
to enjoy the pleasant surroundings. With the assistance of 
the Chelmsford Jaycees, the Center acquired a lovely 
patio, complete with furniture. 

Transportation 

During 1979, the Council on Aging Van traveled over 
25,000 miles and transported approximately 3,500 per- 
sons to their destinations. In November, the new 'Road- 
runner' service began due to the Town's membership in 
the L.R.T.A. and offered services to elderly and handi- 
capped residents of the Town. 

Nutrition 

The Elderly Lunch Program continued to offer nutri- 
tious luncheons each Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
at the McCarthy Junior High School at a cost of 50 cents 
per meal. The meals on wheels program has shown an in- 
creased demand as our volunteers delivered 90 meals 
each day to home bound elderly throughout the Town. In 
total, more than 20,000 meals were served in 1979. 
Special thanks to the Chelmsford School Food Service 
workers and the many volunteers who make this program 
the success it is. 

Health Maintenance 

The Elderly Health Clinics which are sponsored by 
Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley in cooperation 
with the Lowell Visiting Nurse Association expanded in 
1979 to offer seven clinics each month. The schedule is as 
follows. First and Third Friday — Drop In Center; Second 
and Fourth Wednesday — N. Congregational Church; Se- 
cond and Fourth Thursday— St. Mary's Church; Third 
Wednesday — Chelmsford Arms. 

The annual influenza program was held in October, 
immunizing over 300 elderly in addition to 50 pneumonia 
vaccines. A glaucoma and diabetes screening clinic was 
also made available to residents during 1979. 

A regular podiatry clinic began in 1979 to assist per- 
sons on limited income who do not have a personal 
podiatrist. The clinics are held on the third Thursday of 
each month by appointment only. 

Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley 

Through appropriation at the 1979 Annual Town 
Meeting, the Town of Chelmsford continued as a spon- 
soring member of Elder Services, entitling Chelmsford's 
elderly to supportive services. Many elderly residents 
received the homemaker, home health aide, nursing and 
chore services available through the agency, enabling 
these persons to remain in their homes. In addition. Elder 
Services added a fourth Senior Aide to Chelmsford, 
bringing increased outreach efforts to our community 

Recreation 

In addition to the recreational activities held at the 
Drop In Center, the Council helped to sponsor various 
trips planned by the Senior Citizens Club. Senior citizens 
traveled to such places as the Mohawk Trail. Quincy 
Market, Wayside Inn, Isabella Gardener Museum, Maine 
Clambake, Bedford Mall, Rockport, Deerfield Fair. 



90 



Foliage Trip, Circus at Boston Garden and the J.F.K. 
Library in 1979. 

Newsletter 

1979 also marked the first full year of publication of 
Chelmsford's 'Senior Citizen Messenger". Each month, 
2,000 newsletters are distributed throughout the Town, 
bringing information to senior citizens. Special thanks to 
local businesses who advertise in the newsletter and make 
the publication possible. 

A new Respite Care Program began in the area during 
1979. This program was made possible through a demon- 
stration grant through the Dept. of Elder Affairs. The 
service aims to provide supervisory care and attention to 
isolated elders who cannot be left alone when the tem- 
porary absence of family members is necessary. In the 
beginning, the program was available only to Chelmsford 
and Westford residents, but was refunded and expanded 
in October to include the entire Greater Lowell area. 
Mrs. Joan Connell, Coordinator, works at the Drop In 
Center and has already met with much success. 

Looking ahead, the Council hopes to continue to ex- 
pand services to meet the needs of our elderly residents. 
In particular, specific plans are underway to begin a 'vial 
of life' program in Town. The Council would like to 
thank the Townspeople and all Town Officials for their 
continued support in its efforts to assist the elderly of 
Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William R. Marson, Chairman 

Louise M. Bishop, Vice chairman 

Gula Boyce, Treasurer 

Kathleen M. Robinson, Secretary 

Christina Ahern 

Arthur Cooke 

Sara Dunigan 

Lillian Gould 

Mary K. McAuliffe 

Edna Nelson 

H. Chadbourne Ward 



COMMITTEE TO UPDATE 
TOWN HISTORY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
Town Hall, Chelmsford, Mass. 

Dear Sirs: 

The Committee to Update the Town History reports 
continuing progress. 

The second draft is about half done. 

All pictures to be used are assembled. 

Lists of new streets, Town Officials, Veterans of 
various wars are compiled except Viet Nam which we 
are still pursuing. 

We are preparing specifications for solicitation of bids. 



We feel that before the year is over we shall be ready to 
go to Press. 

We request that an article be placed in the Annual 
Warrant for Town Meeting that will allow us to proceed 
with publication should the voters act affirmatively. 

Very truly yours, 

Charlotte P. DeWolf 
Chairman 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Members 

John McCormack 

Judith Hass 

Laurence Cunningham 

Dennis Ready 



Frank Siraco 

Edward Duffy 

John Chiungos 



The following three members were not reappointed: 

John Balco David Merrill 

Mary Pease 

Mr. Donald House, who 'served the Commission most 
capably, resigned in January of 1979. 

Membership Status 1978-79 ResponsibilityTerm Exp. 

John McCormack, Chairman 1980 

Frank Siraco , Wetlands (Clerk) 1 980 

Judith Hass, Land Acquisitions 1981 

Edward Duffy, Reservations Management 1982 

Laurence Cunningham, Reservations Management 1983 

John Chiungos, Land Acquisition 1983 

Dennis Ready, Wetlands 1983 

Mrs. Marguerite Waldron is our part-time secretary. 
Membership changes during the year included the ap- 
pointments of Mary Pease (due to a vacancy on the Com- 
mission because of the resignation of Mr. Donald House 
in January, 1979) and the appointments of Laurence 
Cunningham, John Chiungos and Dennis Ready to 
replace Mrs. Pease and Messrs. John Balco and David 
Merrill. 

The Commission received new regulations from the 
State regarding The Wetlands Protection Act. Mr. Balco 
reviewed them and incorporated them into our own 
guidelines. 

Interboard Cooperation 

Rapport between the Planning Board and the Com- 
mission has been excellent. Several meetings have been 
held between the two boards to discuss matters of mutual 
concern such as Flood Plain and Flood Hazard (HUD) 
maps. The Planning Board routinely asks for the Com- 
mission's opinion on preliminary subdivision plans so that 
applicants immediately know when a wetland permit 
must be obtained from the Conservation Commission, 
thus eliminating possible wetlands problems and undue 
costs to the developer and/or town. 



91 



Neighboring Commissions 

The Commission has and will continue to seek close 
cooperation with neighboring commissions — specifically 
Westford, Carlisle and Lowell. 

Wetlands 

A total of fourteen hearings were held under the 
Wetlands Protection Act (Chapter 131, Section 40 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws) for the fiscal year 
1978-1979. This is a more than 50% increase over the 
number of hearings held the previous year. In all in- 
stances, Orders of Conditions were issued. These wet- 
lands matters continue to take up most of the Commis- 
sions's time and energy. 

A meeting was held on 12 December 1978 between the 
various boards in town for the purpose of reviewing the 
new wetlands map and its applications. These maps were 
prepared by Interdisciplinary Environmental Planning of 
Wayland, Massachusetts. 

Land Acquisitions 

The town purchased 8 acres of land, the Liakos pro- 
perty, off of Robin Hill Road at its Annual Town 
Meeting. This property was partially financed through 
Self-Help Funds approved by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. The Liakos property abuts other Conser- 
vation land. Its acquisition is part of the town's Open 
Space Plan. The town now has 342 acres of conservation 
land. 

Final approval of the Self-Help applications for land 
known as Village Square off of Winter Street was also 
received. 

It is the purpose of the Land Acquisitions program to 
protect Chelmsford's natural resources including its ac- 
quirers and to preserve its open space. It is to that 
measure that our 1979-1980 efforts will be directed. 

Reservations Management 

Again, a great deal of effort was directed toward the 
improvement of conservation lands so as to promote 
greater public use. Mr. Richard Guaraldi, a CETA 
employee for six months, devoted most of his time putting 
up new signs and clearing more trails. 

At the request of the Commission, the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society prepared a pamphlet (made available 
at the libraries) which identified a nature trail in the 
George B.B. Wright Reservation. 

Mr. Duffy was appointed Chairman of the Town 
Forests Committee. 

Last summer, members of the Youth Corps (mostly 
from Chelmsford and Lowell) did some extensive work in 
the clearing and marking of trails on all the reservations. 

The Conservation Commission is looking into the 
possibility of contracting a professional forester to go 
through the Wright Reservation and recommend good 
procedures as it relates to marking trees for cutting. The 
trees designated for cutting will be made available to the 
townspeople free of charge. With the guidance of Town 



Counsel, a permit system will be formulated. 

The Conservation Commission is contemplating the 
building of a parking lot at the entrance of the Wright 
Reservation so that we can improve accessibility and pro- 
mote Tvider use of the reservation. 

DOG OFFICER 



The following is a report of my services as Dog Officer 
for the year 1979. 



Stray Dogs sold to individuals 
Stray dogs sent to Medical School 
Stray dogs disposed of 

Total stray dogs picked up 

Complaints investigated 

Miscellaneous calls 

Dead animals picked up 

Miles traveled 

Lost dogs returned to owners 



42 

128 

5 



175 

712 

2,743 

359 

22,641 

196 



Respectfully submitted 

Frank Wojtas, Jr. 
Dog Officer 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Richardson, Chairman 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr., Vice-Chairman 

Jane B. Drury Gerald Locker 

Emile Dumont George A. Parkhurst 

Martha Sanders 

Members leaving during the year: 
John D. Hamilton 
Bertha E. Trubey 
Nancy M. Hicks 

The Historical Commission met at the 1802 School- 
house on the last Thursday of each month during the 
year. 

Eight historically significant buildings were research- 
ed, documented and added to the inventory of Chelms- 
ford's historical assets. The Commission has been pleased 
to give assistance to the townspeople interested in having 
their property listed in the National Register of Historic 
Places. Although the properties evaluated did not all 
qualify, the interest is appreciated. 

Through research of historical data, the Commission 
has made progress in locating the site of the house where 
Chelmsford's first town meeting was held, in 1655. Mr. 
Robert Drinkwater, an experienced archeologist recom- 
mended by the University of Massachusetts, has assisted 
greatly. This project is to be continued as part of the 
Commission's historic site marking program. 

During the year the Massachusetts Historical Commis- 
sion completed their work on nomination papers for the 



92 



Chelmsford Center Historic District, which were submit 
ted in November 1979, to the National Park Service for 
approval to be listed in the National Register of Historic 
Places. 

The 100th anniversary of the Town Hall will take place 
in 1980. The Commission plans to commemorate the 
event in a way that will illustrate how the function of the 
Town Hall has changed as the town has grown. 

The Commission wishes to thank Mrs. Sally Madison, 
Coordinator of Social Studies, for her additional efforts 
to make the second grade students' visits to the 1802 
Schoolhouse a success. The Park and Cemetery Depart- 
ments also deserve recognition for maintaining the 
grounds around Middlesex Canal Toll House and the 
1802 Schoolhouse. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Richardson, 
Chairman 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Members 

Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D., Chairman 
John P. Richardson, Vice Chairman 
Robert P. LaPorte, Jr. 
Richard O. Lahue, Sr. 
Jeanne L. Parlee 

Alternates 

Harold J. Davis 
Leon O. LeMaire III 

During the year 1979, the Historic District Commission 
met at the 1802 School House on the first and third Mon 
day of each month. The following Certificates of Ap 
propriateness were issued by the Commission: 



L. Rodger Currie 
17 High Street 



Richard B. Codling 
26 Worthen Street 



Michael S. Jones 
61 Central Square 

Chelmsford Chamber 
of Commerce - 20 
Chelmsford St. 

St. Mary's Church 
25 North Rd. 



Dominic Nicolosi 
6 Central Square 



— February 5 , 1979 - erection of a 
split rail fence to extend from the 
northwest rear corner of the house 
back to property line. 

— February 5, 1979 erection of a 
sign 7' x 1' x 2 1/2" black letters 
on a beige background. 

March 5, 1979 erection of an 
11" x 16" sign white with black 
lettering. 

March 19, 1979 -Removal of 
door frame and close opening on 
the north rear side of the CCD 
building. Removal of one post and 
widen steps of open frame porch 
on the south side of the building 
installation of aluminum com 
bination windows and resurfacing 
drive and parking area in rear. 

— April 2, 1979 —erection of a 
sign 24 X 11 ' 6" white background 
with black and green lettering. 



Alan Greenhalgh 
4 Bridge Street 



St. Mary's Church 
25 North Road 

Robert E. Parsons 
Chelmsford Vacuum 
Cleaner Repair 
59 Central Square 

Fiske House - First 
Bank & Trust 
One Billerica Road 



Paul J. Canniff 
8 Westford Street 



St. Mary's Church 
25 North Road 



April 10, 1979 -construction, 
reconstruction, removal, altera 
tion and landscaping changes to 
the exterior architectural features 
of the so-called Emerson property 
that houses the Central Savings 
Bank on North Road. 

*Final approval on complete pro 
ject was issued September, 1979. 

-April 10, 1979 Enclosure of 
front and rear porches 

with casement type windows for 
conservation of energy. 

June 4, 1979 —wheelchair ramp 
for front entrance. 

October 3, 1979 erection of a 
sign 8' x 29" black lettering with 
an off white background to match 
signs at Center Mall. 

-October 18, 1979 -repair fire 
damage to structure via recon 
struction of front facade, gable 
ends above masonery line, roof 
and exterior framing. Basic ex 
terior materials to be cedar clap 
boards with wood trim, Mark 25 
Asphalt Roof Shingles and a com 
bination of new and restored trim 
elements on existing elevations to 
affect a total exterior restoration. 
Final list and exhibits on file with 
Clerk's office. 

-October 29, 1979 -construction 
of a chimney to service a wood 
stove. 

December 3, 1979 construe 
tion of a canopy over the entrance 
of the north side in the rear of the 
church building. 



The Commission's primary concern over the past year 
has been the restoration of the Fiske House in the Center. 
We now feel confident that this project is finally under- 
way and will be successfully completed. Also of great in 
terest to the Commission was the restoration of the Emer- 
son House and development of a park area at the Central 
Savings Bank property on North Road. The Commission 
would like to thank the townspeople of Chelmsford, and 
especially the property owners within the district, for 
their continuing cooperation and support of its efforts to 
preserve and protect the Historic District of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D. 
Chairman 



93 




HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 1979-1980 
Seated — Right to left: C. Spear, chairman; K. Burke; 
J-P. Gravell; K. Demers. Standing: R. Hicks; A. Lloyd; 
P. Leney. 



HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee, founded by 
town meeting in March, 1963 to examine state activities 
that have an impact on local government, continues to 
function in an advisory roll. Through close contact with 
our state senator and representative, the Massachusetts 
Municipal Association, and regular monthly review of the 
Beacon, a state legislative digest, the committee main- 
tains a vigilance on state issues and begins investigations 
when warranted. 

Written reports are submitted to the Selectmen on a 
variety of issues. While many concern state/local affairs, 
some are of interest only at the local community level. 
Consequently, over the years, the operating base of the 
committee has expanded from state/local issues ex- 
clusively to include purely local issues as well. This 
gradual change has broadened the interest base of the 
committee and changed its image. Requests for advice 
from the Selectmen have been instrumental in the change 
process. 

The success of the committee is best demonstrated by 
reporting that the Board of Selectmen expanded the 
membership from seven to eleven members in 1979. The 
following list is representative, though not all inclusive, of 
issues worked on over the past year: 

1. Five referendum questions were submitted to the 
Board of Selectmen, and one was placed on the 
ballot for town election. 

2. An investigation of "?ero quorum" for town meet- 
ing led to a warrant article, which was voted in at 
town meeting. 



3. A recall bylaw was submitted from the floor at town 
meeting. Chelmsford still does not have one, and 
the committee is reconsidering the issue. 

4. An in-depth study of town charters led to a detailed 
written report submitted to the Board of Select- 
men. 

5. A study of binding versus non-binding referendum 
questions was completed and a written report is on 
file. 

6. Town meeting attendance opinion survey — final 
report in process. 

7. Town Purchasing Agent investigation: met with 
two former town purchasing agents and the current 
school purchasing agent: Investigation still in pro- 
cess—general feeling is that town would benefit. 

8. Developed a report on town meeting dates as they 
relate to attendance. Report will be ready to submit 
to Selectmen in early 1980: issue still on the agenda. 

9. Methods of preparing town budget discussed: still 
in process. 

10. Advised and supported Board of Selectmen on "Ex- 
ecutive Secretary" position. 

11. Worked at collecting signatures in support of state 
House Bill H 5915 (Proposition 2]£). 

12. Developed mechanism for polling town residents on 
town issues— still in process. 

13. Advised Board of Selectmen with a written report 



94 



14. 



on issue of state mandated added workload on the 
Building Inspector's Office: Concerned checking 
public buildings for proper thermostat settings. 

Developing a recommendation for using a lottery 
system to select warrant articles at Town Meeting — 
still in process. 



15. Carol Amick met with the committee three times 
over the past year on issues that affect state and 
local relations. 

It has been an especially good year for working closely 
with the Board of Selectmen on some issues of vital in- 
terest to the town. We hope the trend toward a closer 
working relationship will continue. 

My thanks go out to all of the members who are, and 
who have, participated in the committee's activities over 
the past year. And from the committee membership, a 
vote of thanks to State Senator Carol Amick and State 
Representative Bruce Freeman, for their interest and 
help. 

Charles K. Spear 

Chairman 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 



CHELMSFORD 
INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



L.James Glinos 
George B. Parrent, Jr. 
Thomas A. St. Germain 



John L. Sullivan, Jr. 
Patrick J. Wood 
Eugene J. Wood 



The Chelmsford Industrial Development Commission 
was reestablished by vote of the Board of Selectmen in 
June 1979. Appointments to Commission membership 
were made by the Board of Selectmen and the Commis- 
sion conducted its first meeting in October 1979. The 
Commission defined its preliminary objective as one 
which provides a planned growth concept utilizing com- 
munity input in the development of industrial lands and 
properties in the town of Chelmsford. Through this pro- 
cess it is expected that proper utilization of industrial 
land will broaden the community's tax base and provide 
employment opportunities for Chelmsford area residents. 
During 1979 the Commission accomplished the follow- 
ing: 

Conducted a survey of community real estate 
organizations to determine the availability of 
industrially-zoned properties. 

Developed a plan to identify private owners of in- 
dustrial land to ascertain their objectives for use of 
this land. 

Encouraged the development of a High Technology 
Industrial Park of 100 acres in the Drum Hill area 
in cooperation with the city of Lowell. 

For the Commission, 
Eugene J. Doody, Chairman 



INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 

The budget is used to remove dead and diseased trees. 
The work is all done at the convenience of the contractor 
with a savings to the town. This type of work at present 
seems to show a slight decline which is encouraging, but 
possibly misleading. 

We are continuing with the same dollar budget hoping 
with a decline in removals we can absorb the cost increase 
passed on by the contractor. 

We continue to keep safety and efficiency our 
priorities. Your calls will help us to serve you better. 

Thanks to everyone for your assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald P. Gray 




MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY 

American Legion Post #212, Warren Ave., Chelmsford, 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Memorial Day observation, each year, is the combined 
efforts of all three American Legion posts in Chelmsford. 
Each post, over a three day period, attends church ser- 
vices, decorates every veteran's grave and holds a 
memorial ceremony at each cemetery. Events are con- 
cluded with a parade and dinner served to honored 
guests, parade participants, veterans and their survivors. 
Throughout the year the Memorial Day Committee fills 
requests for flags and markers to be placed on the graves 
of deceased veterans. 

The committee wishes to thank the people of the Town 
and the Town Officials for their assistance and participa- 
tion. 

Respectfully submitted 

Armando Trombi, Chairman 
Harry Silveria, Secretary-Treasurer 

Anthony Succo 

Alfred Ryan 

Timothy O'Connor 

Manuel Sousa 

Anne Jensen 



95 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Mr. Louis Kelly, Chairman Chelmsford 

Dr. Thomas Thorstensen, Vice-Chairman Westford 

Mr. Donald Ayer, Secretary Chelmsford 

Mr. Randolph Brumagim Chelmsford 

Mr. Jay Knox Chelmsford 

Mrs. Jane Barry Groton 

Mr. Jordan Waugh Groton 

Mr. Douglas Cox Littleton 

Mr. Augustine Kish Littleton 

Mr. William Buxton Pepperell 

Mr. Rudolph F. Schultz, Alternate Pepperell 

Mr. Robert Manning Shirley 

Mr. Rodney Huff, Alternate Shirley 

Mr. Richard Kangas Townsend 

Mrs. Irene MacHemer, Alternate Townsend 

Mrs. Charlotte Scott Westford 

Mrs. Cecile Stefanski Westford 

Superintendent-Director 

Thomas Lafionatis 

Office- 100 Littleton Road, Westford 
Telephone: 692-4711 

Asst. Superintendent -Director Mr. Bernholdt Nystrom 



Academic Coordinator 
Technical Coordinator 
Director of Pupil Services 
District Counsel 
District Treasurer 



Mr. Raymond Harding 

Mr. David McLaughlin 

Mr. Paul Royte 

Mr. Charles Zaroulis 

Mr. Thomas St. Germain 



The Nashoba Valley Technical High School District 
has completed its tenth year of operation. Each year as 
the school became a year older we had a feeling that the 
annual report would be a "ho-hum!" affair; however, this 
has not been the case at all. As we compile historical and 
statistical data each year, for the annual report, we find 
that the year was an exciting one. The school was in flux 
and progressing with new programs - ideas - ac- 
complishments. 

The school opened ten years ago, with eight depart- 
ments, and currently it is offering students opportunities 
in fourteen departments. Next year with the new addition 
it will offer twenty departments, but more on this later. 

This year the district was deeply involved in the 
mechanics of adding four new towns to the district. The 
towns of Ayer and Shirley, and later Townsend and Pep- 
perell requested to be allowed to join the Nashoba 
Technical High School District as member towns. 
Although all vocational and academic districts have a 
clause in their agreements to accommodate for adding 
towns to the district, none have ever done so. The 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School District is the first 
district in the Commonwealth to add new member towns, 
and by so doing had to "plow new ground" to accomplish 
this, since guidelines and past experiences did not exist. 

When the work was done and the final votes taken, the 
towns of Townsend, Pepperell and Shirley voted to join 



the district, and the present district towns voted to accept 
them. Additions and alterations to the building were 
planned, and approval for a three million dollar bond 
issue was received. The cost of this bond will be borne by 
the new member towns over the next ten years. Construc- 
tion started in October of this year, and the construction 
and alteration project will be completed in time for the 
opening of school in September of 1980. 

Under the new district agreement the school district 
committee members will be appointed by an appointing 
body in each town, made up of the Selectmen, School 
Committee and Moderator, the Moderator being 
designated as the Chairman. This new system will be in 
effect commencing with the first day of April 1980. 

The departments being added to the schools offerings 
are: Automotive Diesel, Small Engine Repair, Upholster- 
ing, Air Conditioning/ Refrigeration, Welding, Hor- 
ticulture and Baking. The departments that will be 
brought into the new school from rented quarters are 
Auto Body Repair, Painting and Decorating, Plumbing 
and Heating, and Culinary Arts. 

Because of the new construction and the increased 
enrollment the school will also have a second gym station, 
larger cafeteria, and larger library. It will also have 
facilities to accommodate, more adequately, students 
with Special Needs. This year the Special Needs Depart- 
ment has a full-time Coordinator in keeping with State 
and Federal Guidelines. The population of Special Needs 
students within the school is about 15%. 

The school's Guidance Department, in addition to its 
ongoing program of testing, counseling and placement, 
has added a new dimension to its service. This new 
dimension is career oriented, and provides through a 
computer system information concerning jobs, careers 
and schools. 

The vocational segment of the school, as usual, was 
deeply involved with all types of productive jobs and pro- 
jects. The following departments, Carpentry, Electrical, 
Painting & Decorating, and Plumbing & Heating are 
currently working on our annual house project for the 
1979-80 school year. The house for this school year is be- 
ing built in Westford for a local resident. 

The Carpentry Department, along with the Electrical, 
Metal Fab, Plumbing & Heating and Painting & 
Decorating Departments are working on the final stages 
of the carriage shed project for the friends of the Adams 
Library in Chelmsford. 

Auto Body repaired and painted a patrol car to be used 
as a safety vehicle for the Chelmsford Police Department. 
They are presently refinishing the forest fire vehicle for 
the Chelmsford Fire Department, and are in the process 
of repairing and painting a former police department 
staff car to be used by the Fire Chief in Littleton. Auto 
Body also repaired and painted a back-up truck for the 
Littleton Fire Department, as well as repairing and pain- 
ting a jeep for the Groton Police Department. 

Students are continually doing many printing projects 
for the various municipal departments in each town. 



96 



Presently there are 107 students working on our co-op 
program involving sixty-seven different area employers. 

In addition to the ongoing programs, we again provided 
special summer programs. These programs were for the 
Nashoba Tech students, and students from the member 
towns' high schools. 

The big item in the planning this year has been Basic 
Skills. Also there has been an update and modification of 
the academic curriculum. 



This year thirty-two seniors (class of 1979) were reci- 
pients of academic scholarships or awards; and thirty-one 
members of the graduating class received trade and in- 
dustry awards from businesses, clubs and organizations. 

The first annual Mall exhibit was set up in the 
Chelmsford Mall in the Spring. It was exceptionally well 
received by all visitors and citizens, as well as merchants. 
It is without a doubt going to be an annual affair. 1979 
has indeed been a very productive and exciting year. We 
are looking forward to the new decade, to a new building, 
new programs and new horizons. 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
July 1, 1980— June 30, 1981 







Budget 


Budget 


Chelmsford 


Croton 


Littleton 


Westford 


Pepperell 


Townsend 


Shirley 




Operating & Maint. 


1979-1980 


1980-1981 


(34.23%) 


(6.80%) 


(8.09%) 


(21.58%) 


(11.73%) 


(11.72%) 


(5.86%) 


1000 


Administration 


116.006 


130.528 


44.680 


8.876 


10.560 


28,168 


15,298 


15.298 


7,648 


2000 


Instruction 


1.370.395 


1.717.555 


587.919 


116.794 


138,950 


370.649 


201.297 


201.297 


100,649 


3000 


School Services 


213.137 


290.064 


99.288 


19.724 


23,466 


62.596 


33.996 


33.996 


16.998 


4000 


Operation of Plant 


296.389 


392.863 


134,477 


26,715 


31,783 


84.780 


46.043 


46.043 


23.022 


5000 


Fixed Charges 


135,856 


157,410 


53,881 


10.704 


12,735 


33,969 


18,448 


18.448 


9.225 




Total Operating 


2.131.783 


2,668.420 


920.245 


182,813 


217.494 


580.162 


315,082 


315.082 


157,542 




Reduced by: 


(838.707) 


(1.140,797) 


(390.496) 


(77,574) 


(92.290) 


(246.184) 


(133.701) 


(133,701) 


(66,851) 




Sub Total 


1.293.076 


1,547.623 


529,749 


105,239 


125.204 


333.978 


181.381 


181.381 


90,691 


7000 


Equipment 


27,890 


405,000 


138.632 


27,540 


32.764 


87.399 


47.466 


47.466 


23.733 










(56.81%) 


(8.72%) 


(10.61%) 


(23.86%) 


(40.00%) 


(40.00%) 


(20.00%) 


8000 


Debt Retirement 
Total Capital 


264,475 


256.433 
506.250 

1,167.683 


145.680 


22,360 


27.208 


61.185 


202.500 
249.966 


202.500 


101,250 




292,365 


284.312 


49.900 


59,972 


148.584 


249.966 


124,983 




Reduced by: 


(131.772) 


(131,772) 


(74.860) 


(11.490) 


(13.981) 


(31.441) 










Sub Total 




(257.158) 
778.753 










(102,863) 
147.103 


(102,863) 
147.103 


(51.432) 




160.593 


209.452 


38,410 


45.991 


117,143 


73,551 










(44.67%) 


(6.93%) 


10.34%) 


(26.01%) 


(5.22%) 


(3.95%) 


(2.88%) 


9000 


Adult Education 


41,900 


41.900 


18.717 


2,904 


4,332 


10.898 


2.187 


1.655 


1,207 




Reduced by: 


(10.000) 


(11,500) 


(5.137) 


(797) 


(1.189) 


(2,991) 


(601) 


(454) 


(331) 




Sub Total 

Grand Total Budget 


31.900 


30.400 


13.580 


2,107 


3.143 


7.907 


1.586 


1.201 


876 




2,466.048 


3.898,003 


1,223.274 


235,617 


281,798 


739,644 


567,235 


566.703 


283,732 




Total Reductions 


(980.479) 


(1,541.227) 


(470,493) 


(89,861) 


(107,460) 


(280,616) 


(237.165) 


(237.165) 


(118.614) 




Chapter 71-16D 
Assessments to Towns 


(280,570) 


(405.471) 


(138.792) 


(27,572) 


(32.803) 


(87.501) 


(47.521) 


(47.521) 


(23,761) 




1.204.999 


1,951.305 


613.989 


118,184 


141,535 


371.527 


282.549 


282.164 


141,357 



NORTHERN MIDDLESEX 
AREA COMMISSION 



The Northern Middlesex Area Commission is a public 
agency operating under Chapter 40B of the Massachu- 
setts General Laws providing comprehensive regional 
planning services to nine communities (Billerica, Chelms- 
ford, Dracut, Dunstable, Lowell, Pepperell, Tewksbury, 
Tyngsborough and Westford) in the Northern Middlesex 
Area. Local representation and policy guidance to the 
Commission's staff of professionals is accomplished 
through the use of Commissioners of which each com- 
munity has three: one each from the Selectmen/City 
Council and Planning Board and one appointed alter- 
nate. 

NMAC is a "comprehensive" regional planning agency 
with a concern and a responsibility to assure that its plans 
and programs are fundamental to all relevant social, 
economic and physical considerations identified on a 
regional and local basis. Toward that end, the "Center 



Development Program" became the focal point of the 
year's efforts. Acting in conjunction with local boards 
and citizen groups, the region's older urban and rural 
centers were identified, needs were quantified and 
definitive programs to meet these needs were established. 
The "Center Development Program" is a reflection of a 
regional planning concern which not only plans with its 
member communities but also assists in the implementa- 
tion of cooperatively designed strategies. 

A summary of the major programs and progress in 
1979 includes the following by category. 

Housing 

1979 was a productive year in terms of the amount of 
housing assistance provided by the Commission. NMAC 
provided direct assistance to the towns of Tyngsborough 
and Pepperell in the preparation of a successful request 



97 



for elderly housing assistance under the Massachusetts 
667 program. Also successful was the request for housing 
rehabilitation assistance for low income renters through 
HUD's Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Program, 
which will be targeted to the towns of Chelmsford, 
Dracut, Westford and Pepperell. 

A major portion of the Commission's housing efforts 
has been channeled to the "Center Development" pro- 
gram in order to identify the housing needs of the resi- 
dents of these areas through surveys and on-site inspec- 
tions. 

Soon to be completed is an Adaptive Reuse Survey 
which is being performed through a CETA Title VIB 
project. This survey has located, catalogued, and photo- 
graphed most large publicly owned and many privately 
owned structures in the region which have a potential for 
reuse as housing units or other specialized programs 
should they become vacant or significantly underutilized. 
As of December 31, NMAC was awaiting approval from 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development for 
the region's Areawide Housing Opportunity Plan which 
documents the housing needs of the area by individual 
community and establishes goals and objectives designed 
to meet those needs. The plan was disapproved last year 
and was resubmitted with the changes as recommended 
by HUD. 

Economic Development 

The Commission is presently in the process of updating 
the Overall Economic Development Plan for the area. 
This document, along with the formation of an organi- 
zation to implement the plan, is a prerequisite to receiv- 
ing assistance from the Economic Development Adminis- 
tration for projects that produce economic benefits in 
terms of creation of additional jobs or new services. 

Transportation 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission, along with 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Works, the 
Commonwealth's Executive Office of Transportation and 
Construction and the Lowell Regional Transit Authority, 
comprise the Metropolitan Planning Organization 
(MPO) for the region which conducts a vigorous com- 
prehensive transportation planning program for the 
area's communities and is responsible for the planning 
and support of transportation improvements. 

NMAC has completed the Merrimack River Crossing 
Corridor Planning study, which recommended a number 
of alternatives for an additional bridge over the Mer 
rimack. After much public participation and discussion, 
the Commonwealth has agreed to move forward with the 
next phase of the project, a more complete Environ- 
mental Impact Statement on the recommended alter 
natives. The State has also been further studying the 
recommendations contained in the Billerica Center By 
pass Corridor Planning Study. 

The commission in conjunction with its Development 
Center Program has been analyzing the traffic situation 
in Pepperell's Railroad Square and the Vinal Square area 
of Chelmsford. Recommendations designed to enhance 
safety and complement the revitalization efforts have 



been developed. Through a special grant from the United 
States Department of Transportation a feasibility study 
concerning the implementation of an automobile 
restricted zone in the Lowell Central Business District is 
presently underway. During the course of this study, the 
Commission staff has worked closely with the City of 
Lowell, the Lowell Regional Transit Authority, the Na- 
tional Park Service and the Lowell Historic Preservation 
commission in order to insure that all efforts of Lowell's 
revitalization are coordinated and integrated with one 
another. Major efforts aimed at discerning the needs and 
problems of downtown merchants have already been 
completed. 

A significant effort has been made by the Commission 
to promote energy conservation through transportation 
efficiency. This has included assisting the Lowell 
Regional Transit Authority with their efforts to en 
courage area residents to use public transit instead of the 
less energy efficient private automobile. Special attention 
has been paid to marketing the public transportation 
system. The Commission has also been working closely 
with MASSPOOL, the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Works, the Private Industry Council, the Lowell 
Regional Transit Authority and numerous private 
employers and transit companies to encourage the forma 
tion of ridesharing alternatives such as carpools, van 
pools, commuter buses and park and ride lots. A draft 
Regional Bikeway Plan has also been prepared which 
suggests an efficient bikeway link among area com- 
munities that can facilitate trips for commuting as well as 
recreation and health purposes. 

Environment 

During 1979, the Commission continued to be involved 
in a number of areas designed to improve and protect the 
region's natural and man made environment. 

Major emphasis was placed on the completion of a 
management plan for the wastewater of the Lowell 
Metropolitan Area under Section 208 of the 1972 Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act. The final Draft Environ 
mental Statement has been completed and will be 
published shortly. Water quality assessments for the 
towns of Dunstable and Pepperell have also been com 
pleted. 

Under a grant received from the Farmers Home Ad 
ministration, a five yeaT open space and recreation plan 
for the town of Tyngsborough has been prepared. This 
plan provides the town with a blueprint for future efforts 
toward the preservation of open space and recreation 
facility planning. The plan also qualifies the town for 
financial assistance through the State's "Self Help" pro 
gram and possible funding through the Heritage and 
Cultural Resources Service of the Department of the In 
terior. 

Also completed during 1979 was a project funded by 
the Environmental Protection Agency designed to cvalu 
ate the possible potential recreational uses of the publicly 
owned open space surrounding the region's wastewater 
treatment plants and rights of way. Bikeways and hiking 
trails are some of the possible uses of these lands. 



98 



At years end, NMAC was awarded a grant from the 
Urban Mass Transportation Administration and the En 
vironmental Protection Agency to conduct an air 
quality /transportation planning program with the goal 
of analyzing a number of strategies designed to meet the 
federal ambient air quality standards. 

In conjunction with the Middlesex Canal Association, 
the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and the Mass 
achusetts Historical Commission, NMAC is continuing 
work aimed at the preservation and reconstruction of 
segments of the Old Middlesex Canal. The entire route of 
the Canal was surveyed and examined by a team of ar 
cheologists this past year and the layout of the Canal has 
been plotted and drawn on local assessor's maps. 

Comprehensive Planning 

The Commission's major comprehensive planning ef- 
fort has been the Center Development Program. The 
Graniteville section of Westford, Chelmsford's Vinal 
Square area, Pepperell's Railroad Square and Dracut's 
Navy Yard section were the targets of this comprehensive 
planning effort to date. The program basically consists of 
working with local boards and resident citizen groups to 
identify and enumerate the real community development 
needs of these specific areas and to propose plans and 
specific methods of implementation. The effort included 
housing studies, traffic analyses, merchant surveys and 
interviews, public facility analyses and other intensive 
studies all of which are vital to the development of a com- 
prehensive strategy to revitalize and rehabilitate these 
centers. Some examples of specific proposals prepared by 
NMAC and tailored to each center included requests for 
housing rehabilitation assistance and storefront facade 
improvement programs through HUD's Small Cities Pro- 
gram, negotiations for home mortgage assistance through 
the Farmers Home Administration and the Massachusetts 
Home Mortgage Finance Agency, the targeting of rehabi 
litation assistance for low income renters through the 
HUD Section 8 Moderate Rehabilitation Program and a 
completed architectural concept plan for storefront im 
provement funded through the Farmers Home Adminis 
tration. 



shared professional specialist funded through the U.S. 
Office of Personnel Management and assistance to 
member communities in the preparation of federal grant 
in-aid requests such as the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development's Small Cities Program. 

Budget 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1979, the Com 
mission expended $306,558. The local share of this 
amount raised through community assessments on the 
nine member communities was $60,000. The fiscal 1980 
budget is $352,550 of which $60,000 was raised through 
local community assessments. 

The Commission meets monthly, usually on the third 
Wednesday of each month (evening) at its offices at 144 
Merrimack Street, Lowell. The public is invited and en 
couraged to attend. 

Additional details and information on all aspects of the 
Commission's operations are available on request to the 
Commission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chelmsford NMAC Commissioners 

Eugene E. Gilet 

John Carson 

Daniel Burke 

Also Served: 
Arnold Lovering 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

January 28, 1980 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 



NMAC is a comprehensive planning agency and as 
such serves as the region's federally designated "A-95" 
clearinghouse. In this capacity, the Commission reviews 
all requests for federal funding assistance for projects that 
originate within or impact the Northern Middlesex area, 
to determine their compatibility with areawide plans, 
goals and objectives. During 1979, the Commission 
reviewed requests for federal assistance totaling over 124 
million dollars. In a similar manner, NMAC also reviews 
projects subject to the Massachusetts Environmental 
Policy Act. 

Technical Assistance 

Technical assistance in relating regional planning to 
the local needs of member communities is a major objec- 
tive of the Commission. Extensive assistance to individual 
communities, public officials and private citizens has 
been provided over the year dealing with a wide variety of 
issues and concerns such as population, housing and 
economic statistics. Direct personnel/management assist 
ance to all member communities with the help of a 



Gentlemen: 

As Sealer of Weights and Measures for the town of 
Chelmsford, I wish to submit my report for the year 1979. 

In performing my duty, I have sealed the following: 

192 Gasoline Meters 
18 Scales- 100 to 5,000 pounds 
56 Scales-more than 10 less than 100 pounds 

8 Scales- 10 pounds or less 
75 Avoirdupois Weights 
1 Over 10,000 pound Scale 

Monies received from seals, the sum of $1,032.00, has 
been turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anthony C. Ferreira 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 



99 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

The Chelmsford Recreation Commission consists of a 
maximum of nine appointed volunteers. The Selectmen, 
on an annual basis, may re-appoint present members or 
appoint new members where the occasion exists. The 
Recreation Commission is responsible for the presenta- 
tion, the administration and the direction of the budget 
which it submits to the voters of this Town at the Annual 
Meeting. It has been the body which is responsible for the 
execution of the Town's recreational needs and the for- 
mulator of the Town's long range fiscal and recreational 
goals. It's main thrust is to provide youth recreation. 

Most of the budget is aimed at programming with each 
sponsored activity raising an equal amount, or more. The 
sponsored program leadership consists of over 1,000 
volunteers who donate nearly 50,000 hours of their per- 
sonal time each year, their automobiles for transporta- 
tion and their own personal financing of end of the year 
get-togethers with their team members. The cost to the 
Town is less than one-third of the entire recreational ex- 
penditures when considering the total Community con- 
cept shown by these volunteers. 

The administration of these programs, the mainten- 
ance of fields used by sponsored organizations, buildings 
and equipment are the responsibilities of the Recreation 
Commission. Some capital outlays plus some salaries are 
required for those programs which are solely sponsored 
by the Town of Chelmsford but are for the benefit of 
every Town member. This past year, after over 20 years 
of strong dedicated efforts of a few long term member- 
ships on the Commission, it was voted by the Town of 
Chelmsford that a full-time person would be necessary to 
reduce the burden to the volunteer members of the Com- 
mission as regards work-day time demands. This new 
position along with the part-time Executive Secretary will 
be most beneficial as regards servicing the East School 
Community Center, increasing the Community's aware- 
ness of the available services, as well as new programs, 
seeking available funding for long range programs and 
applying professional skills in channeling any spontaneity 
of interest from the volunteers. 

With over 4,000 registered youths in the volunteer 
recreational programs in Chelmsford, it is of more than 
passing interest to state that participation continues to be 
high, that the quality must be good, that the facilities are 
there to cover the needs and that problems are at a 
minimum. With an added professional on the Recreation 
Commission Team, it is expected that research in fun- 
ding, planning and counseling will assure the continued 
success of the present programs while affording an ex- 
tended service to the Community based on realistic survey 
analyses. 

It is sincerely hoped that the fast rising rate of interest 
in Soccer will be adequately met through the creation of 
two new fields at Harrington School, the development of 
a practice field at Southwell and the re-furbishing of 
Robert's Field. The maintenance and care of all facilities 
used by the Recreation Commission must be addressed in 
order to assure continued utility. 



The Town of Chelmsford continues to show dedication 
to the needs for recreational enjoyment by the youth of 
this progressive Community. The extreme cooperative- 
ness, shown by the partially sponsored organizations, 
towards the Chelmsford Recreation Commission's total 
responsibility of fiscal material and property obligations 
has been one of the important reasons why the youth have 
benefitted. Our aim is to increase the services to even 
more of the Community needs as well as to continue the 
close relationship with the many dedicated volunteers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joan Murray, Chairman 

Bette Ressel, Vice Chairman 

Rodger Abernathy 

Harry Ayotte 

Jack Bilodeau 

Robert Charpentier 

Bruce MacDonald 

Paul Murphy 

Richard Page, Recreation Director 

Evelyn Newman, Administrative Assistant 

SIGN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The purpose of the Sign Advisory Committee is to work 
in conjunction with the Building Inspector and the Board 
of Appeals in attempting to control "visual pollution" due 
to improper or unauthorized signs and to review and 
comment on all sign applications, especially those involv- 
ing appeals to the Appeals Board. 

After having met for five months, on February 28, 
1979 we received the first sign applications for review. 
Since that time we have reviewed 31 sign applications. 
Eighteen were reviewed with approval, while thirteen 
were told to either change specifications or go to the 
Board of Appeals. 

Members of the Committee are: 



Deborah Dion 
Mitchell Korbey 



Charles Marderosian 
Susanne Reade 
Jean Rook, Chairman 



TOWN AIDE 



Throughout 1979, the Town Aide Department focused 
its efforts toward assisting the Townspeople by encourag- 
ing participation in all available anti-poverty programs. 
Although a great deal of time is now being spent in 
assisting the elderly of Chelmsford, including recruitment 
for such programs as: Foster Grandparent Program, 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program and Senior Compa- 
nion Program; much effort has been placed into recruit- 
ment and referral for the following programs which are 
available to low income residents: HeadStart, Neighbor- 
hood Youth Corps, Section 8 Rental Subsidy, Vocational 
Advancement through Skill Training, Family Day Care 
and Energy Assistance Programs. 



100 



The benefits of these programs to participants and the 
community can be demonstrated specifically by the 
following breakdown of the financial impact for 1979: 

Head Start (7 enrollees) $ 9.800. 

Neighborhood Youth Corps (83 enrollees) 63.432. 

Vocational Advancement through Skill Training 

(12 enrollees) 28,233. 
Energy Assistance Programs 24.766. 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program (3,229 hrs.)* 10,009. 
Senior Companion Program (1,283 hrs.)* 3,977. 
Foster Grandparent Program (2.748 hrs. )* 7.969. 



*based on minimum wage 



TOTAL 



$148,186. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen M. Robinson 
Town Aide 



DEPT. OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

I respectfully submit the Annual Report of the ac- 
tivities of this department, as Veterans' Agent and In- 
vestigator for the year 1979. 

VETERANS' SERVICES/MASSACHUSETTS 



Month 



Amount 



January- 






$ 5,683.32 


February 






5,224.68 


March 






3.096.68 


April 






4,236.71 


May 






7,710.46 


June 






7,152.51 


July 






3,908.67 


August 






3,914.50 


September 






14,922.12 


October 






6,746.68 


November 






14,359.69 


December 
Total 






4,733.87 
$81,689.50 


Provided trar 


isportation 


for Veterans 


and their 


families. 








To: Bedford 






75 


Brockton 






30 


West Roxbury 




15 


Jamaica Plain 




28 


Total 






148 



VETERANS' ADMINISTRATION/FEDERAL 

Autos and special equipment for 

disabled veterans $ 2,000 
Compensation to dependents for veterans 

service-connected death 11,000 

Dependents indemnity compensation 185,000 
Sons, daughters, wives and widows education 38,000 
Specially adapted housing for 

disabled veterans 4,000 

Veterans death pension 218, 000 

Veterans disability compensation 1,311,000 

Veterans disability pension 267,000 

Veterans insurance and indemnities 195,000 



Veterans burial awards and other 
miscellaneous benefits payments 

Vocational rehabilitation training for 
disabled veterans 

Total 



317,000 
16,000 



$2,602,000 



Massachusetts Veterans' Services Department is con- 
tinually revising their directives to help the veteran and 
his family. We have stayed on top of this by attending the 
quarterly meetings of the Middlesex County Veterans 
Agents Association and the Boston office of Veterans' 
Services. 

At present, I am serving as Secretary/Treasurer of 
Middlesex County Veteran Service Agents Association 
and also a member of the Executive Board. 

The types of assistance rendered by this office vary 
greatly and include: medical, educational, death 
benefits, financial aid, etc. In order to successfully ad- 
minister our duties, we have a constant line of com- 
munications with many other agencies such as The 
Veterans Administration, Social Security, Division of 
Employment Security, CETA Administration, Public 
Welfare, Council on Aging and others. We are grateful 
for their assistance and support. 

The Department of Veterans' Services wishes to thank 
the town officials, board members, employees, and all of 
the Veterans organizations for their fine cooperation dur- 
ing the past year. 

If anyone has any questions, please feel free to call the 
office at 256-8713 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 
4:30 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe 
Veterans' Agent 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

To The Honorable Board of Selectmen, and Residents 
of the Town of Chelmsford: 

The Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee had one 
meeting during 1979 at which time action was taken on 
one application for assistance. The Committee did ap- 
prove the granting of aid in the form of a payment for a 
utility bill for a Veteran of World War II. 

The assets of the fund did increase during 1979 and 
$314.23 was added to the savings account. The amount 
of aid disbursed was $118.12. 

The addition of added funds will further assist 
Veterans of World War II in the future who are faced 
with emergency situations. Applications are always 
reviewed at first with the Veterans' Agent of the Town as 
assistance can often come from that town department 
with the state participating financially. The Veterans' 
Emergency Fund has always served as a backup agency to 
further assist our Veterans. Aid, when approved by a ma- 



101 



jority of the committee members, is in the form of 
Material Grants, such as medical, fuel, housing, utility 
and clothing allowances. 

We now have a substantial sum of money invested in a 
Savings Term Certificate earning 6 3/4% annually. The 
funds remain in this account for two and one-half years. 
A substantial regular savings account is also maintained 
to meet current needs. 

Our Precinct 1 representative, Charles E. Jangraw, 
resigned during December 1979 and it is hoped that this 
vacancy will be filled by the Selectmen early in 1980. 

Once again we list the names of members of our com- 
mittee in the event that future applicants might care to 
submit requests for information or applications for 
assistance. The members are: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 
Precinct 10 
Precinct 1 1 
Precinct 12 



Robert E. Donaldson 
Victor W. Fetro 
James J. Walker 
John J. McNulty 
George F. Waite 
Alfred H. Coburn 
Thomas A. Ennis 
Dr. Kenneth A. Cooke 
Peter J. Saulis 
Melvin P. dejager 
Herbert T. Knutson 
Gerard A. Vayo 



The Committee extends their appreciation to the 
Selectmen, to the Town Veterans' Agent, Mrs. Mary K. 
McAuliffe. other town officials and employees for the 
kind assistance given during the past year. 

Respectfully yours, 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Chairman 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 

January 1st, 1979 to December 31, 1979 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1979: $7,209.43 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest $255.35 

The Commonwealth Federal Savings and 
Loan Association, Lowell, Mass. 
Dividends .$177.00 

Total Receipts: $ 432.35 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1979 and 
Receipts: $7,641.78 

Deduct Disbursements: 
Veteran's Assistance; 

One Application Approved: $ 118.12 

Balance on Hand as of December 31st, 1979:. $7,523.66 



ASSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

On Deposit, Bank Book Number 128790: . . $4,923.66 

Commonwealth Federal Savings and Loan Association, 
Lowell, Mass. 

Savings Term Certificate, Account Number 

901-035 01: $2,600.00 

Total Assets: $7,523.66 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities: $ None 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities: $7,523.66 



Respectfully yours, 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Treasurer 



YOUTH CENTER 

The Chelmsford Youth Center has completed its 10th 
year of successful operation. We have expanded pro- 
gramming and services to better meet the needs of 
Chelmsford Youth. Overall, it has been a very busy and 
rewarding year for Youth Center staff and Advisory Com- 
mittee. 

Over the past year many changes have taken place at 
the Center. We have several new Advisory Board 
members who have added new energy to the Youth 
Center. We have relocated from the all-purpose room 
which was taken by the Housing Authority, to the upper 
McFarlin Building, utilizing three former classrooms. 
Starting in the spring 1980, we will be located in rooms 
off the gymnasium in McFarlin basement. 

The Youth Center ran a special summer program last 
summer and it was widely received. Some of the activities 
included weekly field trips totaling 18. Some of the places 
visited included Cranes Beach, Hampton Beach, New 
England Dragway, Canoeing in Groton, Fanueil Hall- 
Quincy Market, Boston, Newburyport Deep Sea Fishing, 
Historic Salem, and the Stoneham Zoo. 

Included in our summer program were expanded 
hours. We opened in the morning from 9:30 to 11:30. 
During these hours we held special Arts and Crafts pro- 
jects and general recreation geared toward the pre-teen 
age group. We ended the summer program with an Open 
House, which included an Art Show, movie festival and 
flea market. 

During the past year we programmed several feature- 
length movies including the "Who's", "Tommy", and 
"Pink Floyd" which were very popular with the youngsters 
at the Center. We participated with Rodenbush Com- 
munity Center and sponsored a hockey tournament held 
at the Center. The Chelmsford youngsters won the tour- 
nament two games to one. We hope to make this an an- 
nual event. We rented the Hi-Hat and sponsored roller 
skating which was attended by over 300 youngsters. 



102 



We initiated a photography workshop and an Arts and 
Crafts workshop. All together, 1979 was a very productive 
year for new programs and special events. All this was ac- 
complished despite CETA cutbacks totaling $25,000. In 
our summer program alone we were attended by over 300 
different youngsters. This was only special events and 
does not include our regular activities. 

On a regular night at the Center you may find Mike 
Fay our athletic supervisor giving instructions on our 
gymnastic equipment, Beth Wagner our Chief Supervisor 
busy showing eager faces the use of the Pottery Wheel, 
Paula Kenney engaging in a rap session with several 
youngsters, and our Coordinator Peter Saulis instructing 
youngsters on the use of an enlarger or camera or playing 
in a game of basketball. 

The Youth Center feels that it has a responsibility to 
respond to the needs of Chelmsford Youth. In this respect 
we initiated the P.A.T. PROGRAM. PAT stands for 
place-a-teen employment program. In conjunction with 
the Newsweekly, which donated over $1,200 in advertise- 
ment space, the Youth Center acted as a placement agen- 
cy for youth ages 12-18. It was the first time a com- 
prehensive youth employment program has been run, in- 
volving the Chamber of Commerce, schools, churches 
and town offices. Through the efforts of everyone involv- 
ed, jobs were found for over 60 Chelmsford youth. This 
represents over $4,000 going to Chelmsford Youth. We 
hope to improve on this program next year, our goal to 
place 100 youth in jobs. 

The past year saw many changes taking place at the 
Center. We feel the changes taken are positive and reflect 
the interest and concerns for the Youth of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul S. Saulis, 
Youth Center Coordinator 

Youth Center Advisory Committee 

Ed Bellegarde, Chairman 

Everett Brown 

Jay Finnegan 

Janet Greeno 

Wendall Luke 

James McKeown 

Karen Spinney 

Trudy Wall 

John Walsh 

George Weinert 

Russell Linstad 



103 



TOWN EMPLOYEES' SALARIES 



Department: Park 



Position 

Superintendent 
Part-time Laborer 
Part-time Laborer 
Part-time Laborer 
Part-time Laborer 
Part-time Laborer 

Department: Accounting 

Town Accountant 
Senior Clerk 
Senior Clerk 
Senior Clerk 

Department: Miscellaneous 

Building Inspector 
Local Inspector 
Senior Clerk, Bldg. Insp. 
Wiring Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Town Counsel 
Council on Aging Clerk 
Council on Aging Van Driver 
Sealer of Wghts. & Meas. 
Recreation Director 
Recreation Summer Director 
Recreation Adm. Asst. 
Home Rule Adv. Com. Clerk 
Home Rule Adv. Com. Clerk 
Cons. Com. Clerk 
Cons. Com. Clerk 
Board of Appeals Clerk 
Finance Committee Clerk 
Personnel Board Clerk 
Sewer Commission Clerk 
Planning Board Clerk 

Department: Dog Officer 



Regular Pay 

J16.467.88 

2,104.96 

1,762.62 

309.12 

1,982.68 

31.84 



18,615.49 
9,656.60 
9,831.30 
9,831.30 



17,433.50 
5,976.00 
9,431.53 
6,839.05 



Overtime Longevity 



Outside 
Details 



3,735.60 
6,052.80 



Dog Officer 


6,901.72 




Dog Officer 


1,721.72 




Assistant Dog Officer 


6,611.92 




Department: Treasurer/Collector 






Treasurer/Collector 


18,871.76 




Assistant Collector 


11,802.04 




Full-time Clerk 


9,831.30 




Full-time Clerk 


9,831.30 




Full-time Clerk 


9,853.05 




Full-time Clerk 


9,179.72 




Part-time Clerk 


869.50 




Part-time Clerk 


460.82 




Part-time Cleik 


5,283.49 




Part-time Clerk 


4,191.56 




Department: Town Clerk/Registrars 




Town Clerk 


17,021.74 




Assistant Town Clerk 


11,136.58 


573.47 


Senior Clerk 


9,841.45 


115.69 


Senior Clerk 


9,841.45 


152.02 


Part-time Clerk 


4,971.33 




Registrar 


360.00 




Registrar 


360.00 




Registrar 


360.00 





Other 


Gross Pay 




$16,467.88 




2,104.96 




1,762.62 




309.12 




1,982.68 




31.84 




18,615.49 




9,656.60 




9,831.30 




9,831.30 


739.50 


18,173.00 


249.00 


6,255.00 


399.77 


9,831.30 


2,081.45 


8,920.50 


3,875.02 


3,875.02 


2,547.00 


2,547.00 


300.00 


300.00 


500.00 


500.00 


3,042.69 


6,778.29 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 




6,052.80 


1,354.20 


1,354.20 


6,014.19 


6,014.19 


81.92 


81.92 


96.96 


96.96 


1,716.40 


1,716.40 


2,024.31 


2,024.31 


2,363.20 


2,363.20 


608.30 


608.30 


955.48 


955.48 


301.55 


301.55 


1,904.84 


1,904.84 


324.26 


7,225.98 


111.80 


1,609.92 


8.69 


6,620.61 




18,871.76 




11,802.04 




9,831.30 




9,831.30 




9,853.05 




9,179.72 




869.50 




460.82 




5,283.49 




4,191.56 


1,000.00 


18,021.74 




11,710.05 




9,957.14 




9,993.47 




4,971.33 




360.00 




360.00 




360.00 



Department: School 



104 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Superintendent 


42,999.84 




Asst. Superintendent 


34,599.89 




Dir. of Personnel 


20.646.00 




Dir. of Federal Projects 


30,999.93 




Supervision 






Foreign Language 


23.815.87 




Art 


21,162.04 




Science/Health Education 


26,805.06 




Career Education 


23,815.87 




Social Studies 


26,893.10 




Mathematics 


9,643.26 




Language Arts/Reading 


28,632.51 




Physical Ed/ Athletics 


25.545.91 




Music 


25,461.41 




High School Administration 






Principal 


30,848.87 




Assistant Principal 


28,162.80 




Dean 


25,321.40 




Dean 


25,321.40 




Dean 


19.858.88 




Dean 


25,321.40 




Teachers — High School 






Reading 


19,970.00 




English 


15,813.50 




English 


15,813.50 




English 


16,279.42 




English 


19,889.70 




English 


12,528.52 




English 


18,053.90 




English 


18,297.32 




English 


14,502.10 




English 






English 


9,293.77 




English 


14,554.48 




English 


9,445.74 




English 


15,800.50 




English 


17,146.67 




English 


14,739.41 




English 


12,160.29 




English 


13,409.22 




English 


16,100.91 




English 


14,071.38 




English 


16,391.79 




English 


7,329.71 




English 






English 


7,041.99 




English 


15,994.11 




English 






English 


9,434.70 




English 


7,153.90 




English 






English 






Business Ed. 


10,679.64 




Business Ed. 


16.229.97 




Business Ed. 


14,544.00 




Business Ed. 


15,936.50 




Business Ed. 


12,219.47 


2,632.25 


Business Ed. 


14.089.45 




Business Ed. 


5,281.41 




Business Ed. 


17,893.40 




Business Ed. 


15,813.50 




Business Ed. 






Business Ed. 


10,305.72 





Longevity 



14,851.72 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 

42,999.84 
34.599.89 




-103.10 


20,542.90 
30,999.93 

23,815.87 




-511.71 


20,650.33 
26,805.06 
23,815.87 
26,893.10 




2,674.09 


12,317.35 
28,632.51 
25,545.91 
25,461.41 

30,848.87 
28,162.80 
25,321.40 
25,321.40 
19,858.88 
25,321.40 

19,970.00 




3,641.90 


18,455.40 




3,641.90 


18,455.40 




3,644.27 


19,923.69 




4.09 


18,893.79 




4.82 


12,533.34 
18,053.90 




.42 


18,297.74 
14,502.10 




275.00 


275.00 




1,419.99 


10,713.76 




3,274.00 


17,828.48 




2,110.51 


11,556.25 




3,541.90 


19,442.40 




.64 


17,147.31 




3,221.98 


17,961.39 




2,620.75 


14,781.04 




3,012.50 


16,421.72 




3.712.62 


19.813.52 




3,012.50 


17.083.88 




3,775.15 


20,166.94 




2,751.50 


10,081.21 




212.00 


212.00 




2,288.17 


9,330.16 




3,404.60 


19,398.71 




256.00 


256.00 




-740.60 


8,694.10 




2,751.50 


9,905.40 




29.04 


29.04 




255.50 


255.50 




2,359.60 


13,039.24 




3,705.35 


19,935.32 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3.641.90 


19,578.40 




3,143.25 


17,232.70 




1,967.85 


7,249.26 
17,893.40 




3.641.90 


19,455.40 




155.00 


155.00 




2,238.60 


12,544.32 



105 



Position 

Business Ed. 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 

Music 

Music 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Physica 

Science 

Science 

Science 



Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 



Regular Pay 

5,330.72 

19,531.90 

8,733.70 

3,337.20 

11,468.72 

7,074.05 

9,487.17 

6,799.26 

11,212.28 

9,145.96 

978.92 

16,364.83 

15,997.22 

14,066.45 

14,648.98 

12,696.34 

7,173.56 

19,968.40 

14,137.69 

8,521.40 



3,559.04 

15,813.50 

16,227.50 

7,962.47 

3,780.00 

8,965.26 

16,934.50 

12,602.34 

16,431.72 

14,749.51 

14,104.45 
14,475.94 
5,066.08 
19,401.52 
11,404.97 
14,313.11 
17,221.62 
16,891.76 
17,893.40 
13,409.22 
15,213.88 

21,803.12 
18,437.57 
15,395.90 

15,986.50 

16,725.24 

15,511.01 

16,748.50 

7,420.59 

11,783.94 
14,241.57 

11,064.82 
5,116.41 



Overtime Longevity 



Outside 
Details 



Other 


Gross Pay 




5,330.72 




19,531.90 


1,977.85 


10,711.55 




3,337.20 


2,490.35 


13,959.07 


2,546.69 


9,620.74 


2,185.05 


11,672.22 


2,223.10 


9,022.36 


2,511.86 


13,724.14 


3,404.60 


12,550.56 




978.92 


3,598.65 


19,963.48 


3,705.35 


19,702.57 


3,143.25 


17,209.70 


3,274.00 


17,922.98 


222.00 


222.00 


.2,882.10 


15,578.44 




7,173.56 




19,968.40 


3,147.42 


17,285.11 


1,908.60 


10,430.00 


213.00 


213.00 


275.04 


275.04 


223.00 


223.00 


626.48 


4,185.52 


3,641.90 


19,455.40 


3,641.90 


19,869.40 




7,962.47 


1,650.98 


5,430.98 




8,965.26 


3,641.90 


20,576.40 


2,882.10 


15,484.44 




16,431.72 


268.00 


268.00 


3,143.25 


17,892.76 


28.68 


28.68 


3,151.59 


17,256.04 


3,206.70 


17,682.64 




5,066.08 




19,401.52 


2,490.35 


13,895.32 


3,012.50 


17,325.61 




17,221.62 


3,643.72 


20,535.48 




17,893.40 


3,016.52 


16,425.74 


2,398.09 


17,611.97 


752.00 


752.00 


792.00 


22,595.12 


4,012.65 


22,450.22 


2,751.50 


18,147.40 


420.00 


420.00 


3,641.90 


19,628.40 


840.00 


840.00 


3,641.90 


20,367.14 


324.00 


324.00 


3,143.25 


18,654.26 


430.00 


430.00 


3,541.90 


20,390.40 


1,340.00 


1,340.00 


1,200.75 


8,621.34 


1,253.00 


1,253.00 


3,641.90 


15,425.84 


3,143.25 


17,384.82 


693.00 


693.00 


2,490.35 


13,555.17 


1,976.81 


7,093.22 


190.00 


190.00 



106 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Science 


13,410.74 


Science 


10,111.62 


Science 


11,946.36 


Science 


19,455.40 


Science 


14,089.45 


Science 




Science 




Science 




Science 


15,857.00 


Science 


4,666.40 


Science 


15,173.93 


Science 


16,021.97 


Science 


16,577.10 


Science 


15,800.50 


Science 


16,016.54 


Science 


18,593.49 


Science 


12,802.27 


Science 


10,460.64 


Science 


20,629.62 


Science 


14,544.00 


Social Studies 


19,155.62 


Social Studies 


12,491.91 


Social Studies 


16,637.50 


Social Studies 




Social Studies 


16,016.00 


Social Studies 


8,546.47 


Social Studies 


16,128.95 


Social Studies 




Social Studies 


15,813.50 


Social Studies 


11,120.47 


Social Studies 




Social Studies 


19,806.26 


Social Studies 


17,030.47 


Social Studies 


12,858.34 


Social Studies 


11,692.35 


Social Studies 


17,294.23 


Social Studies 




Social Studies 


14,429.51 


Social Studies 


16,558.50 


Home Economics 


14,544.00 


Home Economics 


14,544.00 


Industrial Arts 


14,569.50 


Industrial Arts 


16,391.79 


Industrial Arts 


15,813.50 


Industrial Arts 


14,544.00 


Work Study 




Work Study 




Librarian 


11,120.47 


Librarian 


6,153.89 


Librarian 


14,554.48 


Guidance-Supervisor 


26,309.92 


Guidance Counselor 


19,455.40 


Guidance Counselor 


4,777.14 


Guidance Counselor 


20,166.94 


Guidance Counselor 


15,813.50 


Guidance Counselor 


15,813.50 


Guidance Counselor 


15,813.50 


Guidance Counselor 


16,023.50 


Guidance Counselor 


15,307.52 


Distributive Education 


11,430.98 


Health Education 


19,470.66 


Health Education 




Health Education 


13,330.42 


Health Education 


16,405.50 


Parker Junior High 




Principal 


29,407.95 


Assistant Principal 


26,268.86 



Overtime Longevity 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 

13,410.74 




2,228.80 


12,340.42 




2,359.60 


14,305.96 
19,455.40 




3,143.25 


17,232.70 




246.00 


246.00 




233.00 


233.00 




155.25 


155.25 




3,641.90 


19,498.90 
4,666.40 




3,468.05 


18,181.98 




3,705.35 


19,727.32 




3,641.90 


20,219.00 




3,641.90 


19.442.40 




3,649.07 


19,665.61 




6.72 


18,600.21 




2,788.35 


15,590.62 




2,159.56 


12,620.20 
20,629.62 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 
19,155.62 




2,684.20 


15,176.11 




3,641.90 


20,279.40 




2,508.00 


2,508.0 




3,641.90 


19,657.90 




1,375.75 


9,922.22 




3,351.08 


19,480.03 




530.50 


530.50 




3,541.90 


19,455.40 




2,105.97 


13,226.44 




- 148.88 


-148.88 
19,806.26 




3,705.35 


20,735.83 




2,882.10 


15,740.44 




2,472.63 


14,164.98 




3,775.15 


21,069.38 




330.50 


330.50 




3,143.25 


17,572.76 




3,641.90 


20,200.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,918.90 




3,775.15 


20,166.94 




3,461.90 


19,455.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




279.00 


279.00 




656.00 


656.00 




2,128.50 


13,248.97 




-444.15 


5,709.74 




2,801.94 


17,356.42 
26,309.92 
19,455.40 




333.86 


5,111.00 
20,166.94 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3.641.90 


19,665.40 




3.404.60 


18,712.12 




3.136.32 


14,567.22 




7.28 


19,477.94 




220.00 


220.00 




3,035.08 


16,365.50 




3,654.00 


20,059.50 

29,407.95 
26,268.86 



107 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Teachers — Parker Junior 


High 




English 


15,905.24 




English 


6,311.20 




English 


14,545.32 




English 


5,636.83 




English 






English 


17,041.43 




English 


5,680.56 




English 


11,730.37 




English 


14,554.48 




English 


15,882.25 




English 


14,316.34 




Reading 


15,813.50 




Reading 


5,330.72 




Reading 


13,022.36 




Foreign Language 


13,982.01 




Foreign Language 


1.777.75 




Foreign Language 


13,946.93 


4.82 


Foreign Language 


8,675.45 


9.64 


Foreign Language 


7,034.42 


121.23 


Foreign Language 






Foreign Language 


14,555.47 


4.82 


Foreign Language 


13,684.46 


4.82 


Mathematics 






Mathematics 


11,123.47 


95.68 


Mathematics 






Mathematics 


17,240.29 


9.64 


Mathematics 


204.00 




Mathematics 


14,374.32 




Mathematics 


15,813.50 


4.82 


Mathematics 


12,838.02 


4.82 


Mathematics 


13.409.22 


4.82 


Mathematics 


14,181.76 


4.82 


Mathematics 


4,444.56 




Mathematics 


15,307.52 


4.82 


Mathematics 


11,845.65 


9.64 


Music 


11,297.47 


4.82 


Music 


9,744.29 




Music 


16,287.50 


4.82 


Art 






Art 


14,312.30 


4.82 


Art 


8,241.25 




Physical Education 


66.92 




Physical Education 


17,527.50 


4.82 


Physical Education 






Physical Education 


9,651.40 


9.64 


Physical Education 






Physical Education 


5,657.84 




Physical Education 


14,804.00 


4.82 


Physical Education 


16,304.54 


4.82 


Science 


4,783.72 


124.82 


Science 


21,148.62 


9.63 


Science 


11,905.90 


4.82 


Science 


18,713.11 


4.82 


Science 


16,451.10 


4.82 


Science 


11,626.11 


4.82 


Science 


15,813.50 


4.82 


Science 


14,551.48 


4.82 


Science 


17,893.40 


4.82 


Science 






Social Studies 


3,718.52 


4.82 


Social Studies 


14,695.98 


9.64 


Social Studies 


14,544.00 




Social Studies 


16,162.34 


4.82 


Social Studies 


14,544.00 


4.82 


Social Studies 


7,651.66 


87.27 


Social Studies 


14,554.48 


4.82 



Longevity 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




3,651.54 


19,556.78 




2,369.24 


8,680.44 




2,852.57 


17,397.89 




311.99 


5,948.82 




143.45 


143.45 




3,923.27 


20,964.78 




2,273.93 


5.954.59 




2,635.42 


14,365.79 




3,278.82 


17,833.30 




3,653.09 


19,535.34 




4.82 


14,321.16 




3,646.72 


19,460.22 




257.00 


5,587.72 




3,354.22 


16,356.58 




3,148.07 


17,130.08 




944.65 


2,722.41 




3,796.73 


17,748.48 




1,967.85 


10,652.94 




996.10 


8,151.75 




234.00 


234.00 




2,910.52 


16,559.80 




3,349.40 


17,914.90 




92.00 


92.00 




2,490.35 


13,709.50 




521.80 


521.80 




3,909.33 


21,159.26 




1,381.07 


1,585.07 




4.82 


14,379.14 




3,641.90 


19,460.22 




2,882.10 


15,724.94 




3,012.50 


16,426.54 




3,143.25 


17,329.83 




180.00 


4,624.56 




3,404.60 


18,716.94 




3,349.40 


15,204.69 




2,492.55 


13,794.84 




1,443.25 


11,187.54 




3,641.90 


19,934.22 




194.82 


194.82 




3.45 


14,320.57 




1,800.85 


10,042.10 




1,688.00 


1,754.92 




3,641.90 


21,174.22 




671.00 


671.00 




3,274.00 


12,935.04 




384.28 


384.28 




25.00 


5,682.84 




3,349.40 


18,158.22 




3,641.90 


19,951.26 




120.00 


5,028.54 




9.10 


21,167.36 
11,910.72 




15.10 


18,733.03 




3,641.90 


20,097.82 




2,001.08 


12,632.01 




3,641.90 


19,460.22 




3,288.60 


17,852.90 
17,898.22 




155.00 


155.00 




1,402.40 


5,125.74 




3,274.00 


17,979.62 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,641.90 


19,809.06 




3,349.40 


17,898.22 
7,738.91 




3,274.00 


17,833.30 



108 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Social Studies 


21,529.50 


4.82 


Social Studies 


20,166.94 


4.82 


Social Studies 


15,887.45 


4.82 


Social Studies 


8,195.92 


41.86 


Home Economics 






Home Economics 


3,337.20 




Home Economics 


5,116.41 


4.82 


Home Economics 


10,840.64 


4.82 


Home Economics 


11,530.72 


4.82 


Home Economics 






Industrial Arts 


14,755.58 


9.64 


Industrial Arts 


15,813.50 


4.82 


Industrial Arts 


13,700.82 


4.82 


Librarian 


15,813.50 




Guidance Counselor 






Guidance Counselor 


11,120.47 


9.64 


Guidance Counselor 


5,794.88 


4.82 


Guidance Counselor 


13,093.18 


4.82 


Guidance Counselor 


13,409.22 




McCarthy Junior High 






Building Master 


27,874.86 




House Master 


23,885.94 




House Master 


22,601.41 




Teachers — McCarthy Junior 


High 




English 


11,178.98 


5.93 


English 


18,006.66 


5.93 


English 


4,239.96 




English 


16,392.05 


5.93 


English 


12,264.90 


11.86 


English 


14,554.48 


11.86 


English 


15,813.50 


11.86 


English 


6,628.74 


5.93 


English 


5,995.36 




English 


15,813.50 


4.82 


English 


15,016.40 


11.86 


English 


14,109.01 


11.86 


Reading 


12,953.10 


23.97 


Reading 






Reading 


2,043.52 




Reading 


15,813.50 


5.93 


Reading 


8,494.56 


11.86 


Reading 






Reading 


14,647.00 


11.86 


Foreign Language 


11,688.50 


4.82 


Foreign Language 


12,491.66 


5.93 


Foreign Language 


5,299.29 


235.37 


Foreign Language 


2,135.44 




Foreign Language 


16,507.11 


5.93 


Foreign Language 


13,409.48 


11.86 


Foreign Language 






Foreign Language 


13,982.01 


11.86 


Foreign Language 


15,718.44 


11.86 


Foreign Language 


14,313.10 


17.79 


Mathematics 


16,546.29 


5.93 


Mathematics 


14,109.27 


11.86 


Mathematics 


10,872.24 


11.86 


Mathematics 


15,383.27 


11.86 


Mathematics 


10,466.69 


11.86 


Mathematics 


14,554.48 


11.86 


Mathematics 


18,913.26 


11.86 


Mathematics 






Mathematics 


15,813.50 


11.86 


Mathematics 


13,409.22 


11.86 


Mathematics 


11,045.16 


11.86 


Mathematics 


4,001.84 




Mathematics 


12,764.66 


11.86 



Longevity 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 

21,534.42 
20,171.76 




1,740.35 


17,632.62 




2,228.80 


10,466.58 




251.60 


251.60 
3,337.20 




1,967.85 


7,089.08 




2,363.72 


13,209.18 
11.535.54 




272.60 


272.60 




1.15 


14,766.37 




3,642.81 


19,461.13 




1.10 


17,706.74 




3,641.90 


19,460.22 




201.00 


201.00 




2,490.35 


13,620.46 




2,228.80 


8,028.50 




2,882.10 


15,980.10 




3,012.50 


16,421.72 

27,874.86 
23,885.94 
22,601.41 




2,490.35 


13,675.26 
18,012.59 




1,818.65 


6,058.61 




3,775.15 


20,173.13 




2,751.50 


15,028.26 




3,274.00 


17,840.34 




3,641.90 


19,467.26 
6,634.67 




189.60 


6,184.96 




3,641.90 


19,460.22 
15,028.26 




3,143.35 


17,264:12 




2,888.44 


15,865.51 




260.72 


260.72 
2,043.52 




3,028.93 


18,848.36 
8,506.42 




223.00 


223.00 




3,281.00 


17,940.16 




2,615.60 


12,308.98 




2,751.50 


15,249.09 




1,534.19 


7,168.85 

2,135.44 

16,513.04 




3,012.50 


16,433.84 




127.30 


127.30 




3,150.20 


17,144.07 
15,730.30 
14,330.89 




3,749.43 


20,301.65 




3,143.25 


17,264.38 




1,068.90 


11,953.00 




3,143.25 


18,538.38 




2,228.80 


12,707.35 




3,274.00 


17,840.34 
18,925.12 




1,632.24 


1,632.24 




3,641.90 


19,467.28 




3,012.50 


16,433.58 




2,359.60 


13,416.62 
4,001.84 




2,882.10 


15,658.62 



109 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Music 


5,417.72 




Music 


165,324.42 


5.93 


Music 


5,198.91 


11.86 


Music 


14,475.76 


11.86 


Physical Education 






Physical Education 


14,713.01 


5.93 


Physical Education 


18,093.66 


5.93 


Physical Education 






Physical Education 


6,197.56 




Physical Education 


8,060.83 


88.00 


Art 


1,782.48 




Art 


5,822.38 


5.93 


Art 






Art 


4,502.56 




Art 


4,545.43 




Art 


6,352.46 


11.86 


Art 


3,337.20 




Science 


19,347.11 


5.93 


Science 


20,168.85 


5.93 


Science 


15,813.50 


11.86 


Science 


13,259.41 


11.86 


Science 


15,936.76 


11.86 


Science 






Science 


19,544.40 


11.86 


Science 


15,937.16 


11.86 


Science 


16,286.50 


11.86 


Science 


12,226.99 




Science 


12,836.34 


11.86 


Science 






Social Studies 


14,544.00 


11.86 


Social Studies 


16,392.05 


11.86 


Social Studies 


16,137.69 


11.86 


Social Studies 






Social Studies 


14,554.48 


11.86 


Social Studies 


11,415.47 


11.86 


Social Studies 






Social Studies 


13,982.01 


11.86 


Social Studies 


10,591.72 


11.86 


Social Studies 


12,602.34 


11.86 


Social Studies 


16,293.65 


5.93 


Social Studies 


2,896.94 




Social Studies 






Social Studies 


13,982.01 


11.86 


Social Studies 


13,409.22 




Social Studies 






Home Economics 


8,845.60 


5.93 


Home Economics 


14,827.41 


5.93 


Home Economics 






Home Economics 


12,001.35 


11.86 


Home Economics 






Industrial Arts 


6,063.66 


11.86 


Industrial Arts 


15,936.50 


11.86 


Industrial Arts 


12,118.12 




Industrial Arts 






Industrial Arts 


2,578.65 




Industrial Arts 


14,772.25 


11.86 


Librarian 


13,982.01 


5.93 


Guidance Counselor 


13,361.06 


5.93 


Guidance Counselor 


16,385.79 




Guidance Counselor 


16,391.79 


5.93 


Byam School 






Principal 


27,261.91 




Teacher 


2,208.44 




Teacher 


9,191.72 




Teacher 


12,537.36 




Teacher 






Teacher 


11,227.91 





Longevity 



3,143.25 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




275.00 


275.00 




-175.14 


16,155.21 




1,967.85 


7,178.62 




2.56 


14,490.18 




1.155.70 


1,555.70 


7,862.19 




18,099.59 




280.00 


280.00 
6,197.56 
8,148.83 
1,782.48 




2,228.80 


8,057.11 




48.58 


48.58 
4,502.56 
4,545.43 




2,359.60 


8,723.92 

3,337.20 

19,353.04 




6.65 


20,181.43 




3,641.90 


19,467.26 




2,620.75 


15,892.02 




3,657.70 


19,606.32 




461.00 


461.00 
19,556.26 




3,657.70 


19,606.72 




3,641.90 


19,940.26 




2,490.35 


14,717.34 




2,800.83 


15,649.03 




240.07 


240.07 




3,349.40 


17,905.26 




3,775.15 


20,179.08 
16,149.55 




179.00 


179.00 




3,274.00 


17,840.34 




2,490.35 


13,917.68 




214.00 


214.00 




3,143.25 


17,137.12 




2,228.80 


12,832.38 




2,882.10 


15,496.30 




3,747.85 


20,047.43 




1,114.40 


4,101.34 




193.00 


193.00 




3,054.42 


17,048.29 




3,102.50 


16,421.72 




223.99 


223.99 




1,967.85 


10,819.38 




3,349.40 


18,182.74 




201.12 


201.12 




2,624.87 


14,638.08 




258.36 


258.36 




2,229.78 


8,305.28 




3,643.48 


19,591.84 




3,461.90 


15,579.97 




190.00 


190.00 
2,578.65 




1.15 


14,785.28 




3,143.25 


17,131.15 




3,012.50 


16,649.49 




3,775.15 


20,160.94 




3,775.15 


20,172.87 
27,261.91 




13.88 


2,222.24 




1,184.69 


10,376.41 




2,815.00 


15,352.36 




108.00 


108.00 




2,490.35 


13,718.26 



110 



Position 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Parker-Grade 6 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Center School 

Principal 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Harrington School 

Principal 
Teacher 



Regular Pay 

17,252.26 
14,831.41 

12,264.90 
15,115.32 
19,681.24 
13,874.43 
13,409.22 

7,817.12 
12,943.70 
16,757.50 
17,120.26 

14,544.00 

11,135.47 
14,559.00 
12,836.34 

14,381.42 
12,372.26 
14,273.98 



14,544.00 
13,016.31 



11,120.47 
17,828.48 
11,120.47 
12,836.34 



27,691.91 
19,578.40 
13,409.22 
951.92 
14,544.00 
15,816.14 
11,480.35 
12,264.90 
14,544.00 
10,919.47 

9,636.94 
17,893.40 

9,796.72 
15,310.57 
17,893.40 
17,940.72 
15,813.50 
16,474.67 
16,391.79 
15,055.76 

1,931.16 
15,813.50 

8,863.40 

15,813.50 

7,025.95 
14,544.00 
14,544.00 



27,691.91 
7,376.90 



Overtime Longevity 



30.47 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 

17,252.26 




3,417.89 


18,249.30 




294.00 


294.00 




2,751.50 


15,016.40 




3,404.60 


18,519.92 
19,681.24 




2.75 


13,877.18 




3,012.50 


16,421.72 




226.02 


226.02 




2,747.40 


10,564.52 




2,882.10 


15,825.80 
16,757.50 
17,120.26 




246.00 


246.00 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




201.00 


201.00 




2,490.35 


13,625.82 




3,349.40 


17,908.40 




2,882.10 


15,718.44 




96.00 


96.00 




2,705.05 


17,086.47 




2,751.50 


15,123.76 




3,206.70 


17,480.68 




84.00 


84.00 




256.00 


256.00 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




2,946.83 


15,963.14 




2,490.35 


13,610.82 
17,828.48 




2,490.35 


13,610.82 




2,882.10 


15,718.44 

27,691.91 
19,578.40 




3,012.50 


16,421.72 




117.00 


1,068.92 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,644.17 


19,460.31 




2,620.75 


14,101.10 




2,751.50 


15,016.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




2,490.35 


13,409.82 




3,641.90 


13,278.84 
17,893.40 




2,228.80 


12,025.52 




3,404.60 


18,745.64 
17,893.40 
17,940.72 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,775.15 


20,249.82 




3,775.15 


20,166.94 




3,274.00 


18,329.76 




738.80 


2,669.96 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,349.40 


12,212.84 




256.00 


256.00 




3,621.90 


19,455.40 




201.00 


201.00 




2,620.75 


9,646.70 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 
27,691.91 




2,751.50 


10,128.40 



Ill 



Position 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

North School 

Principal 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

South Row School 

Principal 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



Regular Pay 
15,831.87 
17,893.40 
15,993.47 

14,328.98 

8,675.45 

11,692.35 

7,795.84 

13,409.22 

14,544.00 

14,544.00 

15,016.40 

11,663.78 

13,187.67 

13,409.22 

9,742.25 

11,692.35 

14,161.98 

19,683.82 
10,548.64 
15,487.49 
9,886.22 
12,836.34 

11,120.47 
15,813.50 
13,635.22 
12,287.90 



27,691.91 
16,421.72 
17,893.40 
14,544.00 
12,264.90 

15,813.50 
13,409.22 
14,544.00 
17,252.26 
14,657.00 
17,893.40 
17,893.40 
13,971.01 
14,544.00 
17,893.40 
14,657.00 
14,733.30 
12,836.34 
14,544.00 
27,095.90 
15,936.50 
15,422.97 
14,544.00 



27,691.91 
14,544.00 
8,023.18 
13,409.22 
15,813.50 
15,813.50 
14,554.48 
14,544.00 
14,544.00 
14,544.00 



Overtime Longevity 



8.00 



15.00 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




3,644.17 


19,476.04 
17,893.40 




3,708.08 


19,701.55 




234.00 


234.00 




3,251.08 


17,552.06 




1,967.85 


10,643.30 




2,620.75 


14,313.10 




2,228.80 


10,039.64 




3,012.50 


16,421.72 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,274.00 


17,828.48 
15,016.40 




2,520.30 


14,184.08 




2,882.10 


16,069.77 




3,013.84 


16,423.06 




2,283.27 


12,025.52 




2,623.05 


14,315.40 




3,206.70 


17,368.68 




223.00 


223.00 
19,683.82 




2,359.60 


12,908.24 




3,468.05 


18,955.54 




2,228.80 


12,115.02 




2,882.10 


15,718.44 




257.00 


257.00 




2,490.35 


13,610.82 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,012.50 


16,647.72 




2,759.97 


15,047.87 

27,691.91 
16,421.72 
17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




2,751.50 


15,016.40 




168.00 


168.00 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,102.50 


16,421.72 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 
17,252.26 




3,353.05 


18,010.05 
17,893.40 
17,893.40 




3,143.25 


17,114.26 




3,349.40 


17.893.40 
17,893.40 




3,349.40 


18,006.40 




2,970.80 


17,704.10 




2,637.75 


15,474.09 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 
27,095.90 




3,538.98 


19,475.48 




3,420.47 


18,843.44 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 
27,691.91 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




2,244.62 


10,267.80 




3,012.50 


16,421.72 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,333.14 


19,146.64 




3,274.00 


17,828.48 




3,349.40 


17.893.40 




3,349.40 


17.893.40 




3,254.75 


17,798.75 




201.00 


201.00 



112 



Position 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Westlands School 

Principal 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Elementary Specialists 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Guidance Counselor 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Music 

Music 

Music 



Regular Pay 

15,813.50 
17,893.40 
14.657.00 
18,006.40 
15,307.52 
19,455.40 
15,813.50 
14,544.00 
14,544.00 
13,842.01 



27,691.91 

5,108.88 

14.544.00 

14,544.00 
14,502.40 
14,544.00 

6.143.65 
15.530.20 
11,692.35 
15,813.50 

2,840.32 
19,455.40 
12,836.34 
15,307.52 
14,544.00 
14,544.00 
14,544.00 
14,544.00 

8.675.45 
14.544.00 
14.544.00 
14,544.00 
14,109.01 
13,868.37 
14,550.27 
12,669.74 

7,727.46 
15,126.32 



14,544.00 
15,936.50 
11,019.97 



16,619.43 

1,827.77 
5,485.95 

16,391.79 
16,391.79 
16,618.79 
10,548.64 

13,489.22 

14,544.00 

8,863.44 

3,337.20 

11,335.14 

9,796.72 

14,554.48 

11,120.47 

11.120.47 



Overtime Longevity 



3.349.40 17.893.40 



208.02 



5.93 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 
17,893.40 




3,349.40 


18,006.40 




94.65 


17,911.75 




3,405.36 


18,712.88 
19,455.40 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,143.25 


16,985.26 
27,691.91 




108.64 


5,214.52 


3.349.40 


17,893.40 






155.00 


155.00 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,851.80 




2,117.85 


8,261.50 
15,530.20 




2,620.75 


14,313.10 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 

2,840.32 

19,455.40 




2,791.87 


15,628.21 




3,404.60 


18,712.12 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,255.17 


17,799.17 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




1.967.85 


10,643.30 




3.349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3.349.40 


17,893.40 




3,143.25 


17,252.26 




3,117.40 


16,985.77 




3,160.10 


17,710.37 




3,342.22 


16,101.96 




2,882.10 


10,609.56 




3.404.60 


18,530.92 




155.00 


155.00 




155.00 


155.00 




279.00 


279.00 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,641.90 


19,578.40 




2,490.35 


13,510.32 




3,775.15 


20,602.60 




132.20 


132.20 
1,827.77 




1,375.75 


6,681.70 




886.64 


886.64 




3,867.35 


20,259.14 




3,775.15 


20,166.94 




3,775.15 


20,299.87 




2,359.60 


12,908.24 




155.00 


155.00 




3,012.50 


16,501.72 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,349.40 


12,212.84 




2,463.54 


5,800.74 
11,335.14 




2,228.80 


12,025.52 




3,274.00 


17,828.40 




2,490.35 


13,610.82 




2,493.65 


13,614.12 



113 



Position 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Phys. Education 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

Reading 

IMC 

Program Supervisor 
Elementary Librarian 

Core Evaluation Team 

CET Chairperson 
CET Chairperson 
CET Chairperson 
Psychologist 
Psychologist 

Title I 

Director 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Instr. Aide 

Clerical Aide 

Special Education 

Director 

Asst. to Director 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



Regular Pay 

10,548.64 
14,657.00 
14,793.40 
11,120.47 
11.078.10 
13.108.28 
13,707.90 
11.692.35 

14.904.00 

4,181.64 

16,690.38 

15.800.50 

15,348.52 

17,718.62 
20,124.38 
16.391.79 
16,445.13 
15.813.50 
15,813.50 

16,391.79 



26,309.92 
12,836.34 



19,853.34 
21,531.18 
19,853.34 
14.358.90 
6,171.38 



19,581.01 
9,021.13 

10,240.45 
9,940.36 
9.940.36 
3,714.24 
9,940.36 
4,506.52 
1,097.50 



29,407.95 
24,601.33 
11,694.99 
2,932.80 
15,097.22 

18,195.68 
14.544.00 
16,534.43 
15,813.50 
17,799.88 

11,237.48 

16.518.79 

9,796.72 

3,780.00 

12,054.40 

10,531.13 



Overtime Longevity 



11.86 



423.33 



5.93 



4.82 



200.76 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




2,362.69 


12,911.33 




2,595.92 


17,052.92 
14,793.40 




2,493.65 


13,614.12 




2,517.96 


13,596.06 
13,108.28 




2,751.50 


16,459.40 




2.620.75 


14.313.10 




1,141.00 


1.141.00 




3,349.40 


18,253.40 
4,181.64 




3,487.52 


20,189.76 




3.641.90 


19,442.40 




474.00 


474.00 




3,404.60 


18,753.12 




370.00 


370.00 




3,641.90 


21.360.52 
20,124.38 




3.775.15 


20,166.94 




3.775.15 


20,220.28 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 




113.00 


113.00 




3.775.15 


20,166.94 
26,309.92 




2,882.10 


15,718.44 

19,853.34 
21,531.18 
19,853.34 




208.17 


14,150.73 




1,589.17 


8.138.88 




146.16 


19,727.17 




1,967.85 


10,988.98 
10,240.45 
9,940.36 
9,940.36 
3,714.24 
9.940.36 
4.506.52 
1.097.50 

29.407.95 
24,601.33 




2,620.75 


14,321.67 
2,932.80 




3,012.50 


18,109.72 




1,344.00 


1,344.00 
18.195.68 




3,349.40 


17,893.40 




3,535.15 


20,074.79 




3,641.90 


19,455.40 
17,799.88 




149.50 


149.50 




2,526.20 


13,964.44 




3,775.15 


20,293.94 




2,228.80 


12.025.52 

3,780.00 

12,054.40 




39.33 


39.33 




2,359.60 


12,890.73 




234.00 


234.00 



Position 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Workshops 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Substitute Teachers 

Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 





114 


Outside 




Regular Pay 


Overtime Longevity 


Details Other 


Gross Pay 


16,750.86 




5,878.86 


20,629.72 






125.21 


125.21 


12,836.34 




2,882.10 


15,718.44 


11,120.47 




2,490.55 


15,610.82 


10,358.64 




2,559.60 


12,718.24 


10,358.64 




2,559.60 


12,718.24 






542.00 


542.00 


18,712.12 






18,712.12 


12,129.34 






12,129.54 


12,006.88 






12,006.88 


2,342.80 






2,542.80 


4,685.68 






4,685.68 


10,226.69 






10,226.69 


12,836.08 




2,882.00 


15,718.08 


16,304.70 






16,504.70 


13,409.22 




3,012.50 


16,421.72 


15,936.50 




3,641.90 


19,578.40 


4,888.00 




817.77 


5,505.77 


16,391.79 




3,775.15 


20,166.94 


12,836.34 




2,882.10 


15,718.44 


11,692.35 




2,620.75 


14,515.10 


6,497.04 




2,092.88 


8,589.92 


16,385.79 




3,775.15 


20,160.94 


15,813.50 


5.95 


5,641.90 


19,461.55 






268.00 


268.00 


5,108.88 






5,108.88 


16,391.79 




5,775.15 


20,166.94 


12,856.54 


4,82 


2,710.42 


15,551.58 






411.68 


411.68 






246.55 


246.55 






926.28 


926.28 






555 40 


555.40 






852.68 


852.68 






555.45 


555.45 






655.42 


655.42 






560.22 


560.22 






755.05 


755.05 






584.85 


584.85 






50.00 


50.00 


5,456.49 




5,898.51 


9,555.00 






240.00 


240.00 






575.00 


575.00 






879.84 


879.84 






180.00 


180.00 






1,125.00 


1,125.00 






161.00 


161.00 






1,628.00 


1,628.00 






571.00 


571.00 






1,918.00 


1,918.00 






1,257.00 


1,257.00 






2,110.59 


2,110.59 






70.50 


70.50 






50.00 


50.00 






502.00 


502.00 






90.00 


90.00 






18.55 


18.55 






5,515.62 


5,515.62 






225.00 


225.00 






669.04 


669.04 






2,165.00 


2,165.00 


955.00 




1,207.00 


2,142.00 






90.00 


90.00 






480.00 


480.00 






511.00 


511.00 



115 



Position 

Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 



Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 



2,392.21 



88.00 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




240.00 


240.00 




30.00 


30.00 




351.90 


351.90 




330.00 


330.00 




825.00 


825.00 




656.00 


656.00 




388.80 


388.80 




411.68 


411.68 




165.00 


165.00 




708.50 


708.50 




180.00 


180.00 




398.00 


398.00 




638.47 


638.47 




176.00 


176.00 




150.00 


150.00 




462.60 


462.60 




205.84 


205.84 




165.00 


165.00 




444.15 


444.15 




25.00 


25.00 




1,160.35 


3,641.26 




370.30 


370.30 




240.00 


240.00 




405.00 


405.00 




411.68 


411.68 




720.44 


720.44 




3,618.00 


3,618.00 




1,929.03 


1,929.03 




580.00 


580.00 




341.00 


341.00 




188.94 


188.94 




1,806.51 


1,806.51 




895.10 


895.10 




22.50 


22.50 




618.00 


618.00 




2,086.10 


2,086.10 




355.32 


355.32 




33.50 


33.50 




273.00 


273.00 




30.00 


30.00 




150.00 


150.00 




120.00 


120.00 




30.00 


30.00 




2,679.96 


2,679.96 




308.76 


308.76 




30.00 


30.00 




444.36 


444.36 




611.00 


611.00 




345.00 


345.00 




836.00 


836.00 




75.00 


75.00 




1,455.00 


1.455.00 




300.00 


300.00 




210.00 


210.00 




1,441.00 


1,441.00 




633.00 


633.00 




1,450.00 


1,450.00 




64.40 


64.40 




1,132.12 


1,132.12 




355.12 


355.12 




640.14 


640.14 




532.00 


532.00 




325.79 


325.79 




473.25 


473.25 




444.15 


444.15 




105.70 


105.70 




1,490.00 


1,490.00 




90.00 


90.00 



116 



Position 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 

Substitute 



Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 



8,863.44 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




590.09 


590.09 




2,120.00 


2,120.00 




555.00 


555.00 




3,949.40 


12,812.84 




630.00 


630.00 




60.00 


60.00 




120.00 


120.00 




2,230.00 


2,230.00 




30.00 


30.00 




26.00 


26.00 




955.00 


955.00 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 




370.30 


370.30 




120.00 


120.00 




662.00 


662.00 




1,271.00 


1,271.00 




924.00 


924.00 




330.00 


330.00 




325.80 


325.80 




1,700.00 


1,700.00 




884.69 


884.69 




116.00 


116.00 




90.00 


90.00 




1,410.00 


1,410.00 




370.08 


370.08 




200.00 


200.00 




211.14 


211.14 




592.48 


592.48 




266.49 


266.49 




251.00 


251.00 




462.60 


462.60 




150.00 


150.00 




4,549.99 


4,549.99 




90.00 


90.00 




200.00 


200.00 




26.00 


26.00 




1,025.92 


1,025.92 




1,227.00 


1,227.00 




1,110.00 


1,110.00 




60.00 


60.00 




3,441.27 


3,441.27 




409.00 


409.00 




374.00 


374.00 




30.20 


30.20 




90.00 


90.00 




514.60 


514.60 




405.00 


405.00 




3,748.42 


3,748.42 




200.00 


200.00 




450.00 


450.00 




1,023.00 


1,023.00 




2,007.00 


2,007.00 




90.00 


90.00 




405.00 


405.00 




702.00 


702.00 




1,873.00 


1,873.00 



117 



Position 

•Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 



Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




4,583.13 


4,385.13 




78.00 


78.00 




30.00 


30.00 




351.00 


551.00 




521.98 


521.98 




88.83 


88.85 




360.00 


560.00 




4,096.38 


4,096.58 




211.14 


211.14 




300.00 


500.00 




200.00 


200.00 




180.00 


180.00 




411.68 


411.68 




420.00 


420.00 




42.59 


42.59 




473.25 


475.25 




2,687.00 


2,687.00 




270.00 


270.00 




120.00 


120.00 




720.00 


720.00 




444.15 


444.15 




189.30 


189.50 




30.00 


50.00 




166.83 


166.85 




445.00 


445.00 




90.00 


90.00 




4,312.98 


4,512.98 




66.68 


66.68 




160.03 


160.05 




1,179.27 


1,179.27 




308.76 


508.76 




390.00 


590.00 




200.00 


200.00 




2,689.00 


2,689.00 




3,004.00 


5,004.00 




100.00 


100.00 




407.25 


407.25 




52.00 


52.00 




551.00 


551.00 




566.00 


566.00 




240.00 


240.00 




753.00 


755.00 




340.52 


540.52 




693.00 


695.00 




220.00 


220.00 




514.60 


514.60 




90.00 


90.00 




283.95 


283.95 




220.00 


220.00 




448.00 


448.00 




462.60 


462.60 




157.00 


157.00 




1,082.00 


1,082.00 




2,907.00 


2,907.00 




283.95 


285.95 




71.00 


71.00 




555.00 


555.00 




308.76 


508.76 




60.00 


60.00 




693.90 


693.90 




55.00 


55.00 




41.00 


41.00 




1,428.54 


1,428.54 




85.13 


85.15 




240.00 


240.00 




200.00 


200.00 




992.00 


992.00 




2,277.00 


2.277.00 



118 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Substitute 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Tutor 






Attendance Officer 


20.999.94 




Dir. School Management 


26,749.97 




Secretaries 






Payroll 


4,377.10 




Payroll 


4,508.40 


283.20 


Administration 


7,316.55 




Payroll 


11,616.80 


879.47 


Administration 


10,266.75 




Bookkeeping 


6,680.80 


46.86 


Bookkeeping 


4,677.48 




Administration 


9,186.75 


123.25 


Administration 


12,187.50 


311.50 


Bookkeeping 


9,662.25 


122.47 


Bookkeeping 


11,616.80 


198.54 


Administration 


3,696.00 




Administration 


8,373.95 


24.05 


Payroll 


9,842.80 




Administration 


10,164.70 


41.68 


Curriculum 


10,306.40 


175.32 


Curriculum 


8,342.75 




Curriculum 


8,897.85 




High School 


2,288.25 




High School 


4,112.55 





Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




228.00 


228.00 




7,261.58 


7,261.58 




5,657.72 


5,657.72 




266.49 


266.49 




514.60 


514.60 




3,436.00 


3,436.00 




514.60 


514.60 




584.00 


584.00 




355.32 


355.32 




640.14 


640.14 




150.00 


150.00 




330.00 


330.00 




384.84 


384.84 




480.57 


480.57 




90.00 


90.00 




678.00 


678.00 




87.81 


87.81 




90.00 


90.00 




473.25 


473.25 




566.00 


566.00 




473.25 


473.25 




1,064.00 


1,064.00 




325.80 


325.80 




44.54 


44.54 




990.00 


990.00 




60.00 


60.00 




211.14 


211.14 




1,499.34 


1,499.34 




210.00 


210.00 




188.94 


188.94 




180.00 


180.00 




913.99 


913.99 




356.00 


356.00 




572.00 


572.00 




3,324.99 


3,324.99 




414.25 


414.25 




720.44 


720.44 




329.82 


329.82 




336.99 


336.99 




458.88 


458.88 




49.40 


49.40 




233.02 


233.02 




1,134.92 


1,134.92 




7,220.20 


7,220.20 
20,999.94 
26,749.97 




67.34 


4,444.44 




2,538.68 


7,330.28 




487.30 


7,803.85 
12,496.27 




-38.32 


10,228.43 




-92.72 


6,634.94 




-43.07 


4,634.41 
9,310.00 

12,499.00 
9,784.72 

11,815.34 




-300.06 


3,395.94 




-553.15 


7,844.85 




-366.20 


9,476.60 
10,206.38 
10,481.72 




-608.49 


7,734.26 




-183.68 


8,714.17 




3,048.35 


5,336.60 




-.03 


4,112.52 



119 



Position 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

Guidance 

Parker Jr. High 

Parker Jr. High 

McCarthy Jr. High 

McCarthy Jr. High 

McCarthy Jr. High 

Byam 

Center 

Harrington 

North 

South Row 

Westlands 

Westlands 

Westlands 

Calls Sub-Teachers 

IMC 

School Committee 

School Committee 

Special Ed. 

Special Ed. 

Sub-secretary 

Sub-secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub-secretary 

Sub -secretary 

Sub-secretary 

Sub-secretary 

Sub-secretary 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Maintenance 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 



Regular Pay 


Overtime 


4.395.95 




7,412.40 




7,710.95 




7,379.45 




9,438.65 




7,379.45 




8,897.85 




9,438.65 




7,833.15 




7,965.00 




9,038.25 




10,890.75 




7,840.95 


62.33 


7,840.95 




7,798.70 




7,840.95 


35.23 


7,488.65 


16.26 


7,241.00 




5,041.17 




4,537.52 




4,951.20 




8,373.95 




7,587.45 


1,538.19 


1,029.60 


334.41 



Outside 
Details 



13,543.40 


386.76 


12,251.20 




11,481.60 


747.92 


11,823.76 


253.44 


11,148.80 


753.55 


11,148.80 


46.86 


11,148.80 


23.43 


11,823.76 


806.58 


15,128.95 




11,148.80 


1,406.30 


11,148.80 


941.75 


12,156.56 


862.00 


8,465.60 


176.35 


10,804.80 


75.72 


10,816.00 


476.10 


10,816.00 


1,405.87 


10,816.00 




10,816.00 


780.15 


10,816.00 




10,816.00 


966.89 


10,816.00 


127.94 


11,148.00 


226.32 


10,816.00 


5,000.09 


11,148.80 


111.20 


10,816.00 


979.80 


10,816.00 


7.56 


3,232.00 




10,816.00 


1,931.78 



Other 


Gross Pay 


458.43 


4,854.38 


329.64 


7.742.04 


355.20 


8,066.15 


105.10 


7,484.55 


222.08 


9,216.57 


323.94 


7,703.39 


-136.88 


8,760.97 




9,438.65 




7,833.15 


-359.11 


7,605.89 




9,038.25 




10,890.75 


342.22 


8,245.50 


377.45 


8,218.40 


-32.29 


7,762.41 


354.32 


8,230.50 


209.38 


7,714.29 


250.50 


7,491.50 


-279.83 


4,761.34 


1,396.16 


5,933.68 




4,951.20 


-93.78 


8,280.17 


1,628.49 


1,628.49 


385.40 


385.40 


51.49 


9,177.33 


3,730.86 


5,094.87 


67.95 


67.95 


56.70 


56.70 


308.07 


308.07 


49.14 


49.14 


149.49 


149.49 


2,073.33 


2,073.33 


440.07 


440.07 


258.28 


258.28 


2,491.16 


2,491.16 


22.68 


22.68 


22.65 


22.65 


90.10 


90.10 


65.00 


65.00 


140.43 


140.43 


-79.00 


13,851.05 


-12.00 


12,239.20 


-291.24 


11,938.28 


-90.08 


11,987.12 


-12.00 


11,890.35 


-12.00 


11,183.66 


-12.00 


11,160.23 


-12.96 


12,617.38 




15,128.95 


-12.00 


12,543.10 


-12.00 


12,078.55 


-12.96 


13,005.60 


12.00 


8,629.95 


12.00 


10,892.52 


-53.00 


11,238.70 


-12.00 


12,209.87 


-12.00 


10,804.00 


12.00 


11,584.15 


-133.20 


10,682.80 


-12.00 


11,770.89 


-12.00 


10,931.94 


-12.00 


11,363.12 


12.00 


15.804.09 


-12.00 


11,248.00 


-12.00 


11.783.80 


-12.00 


10,811.56 


-243.40 


2,988.60 


-12.00 


12,735.78 



120 



Position 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Sub-custodian 

Director-School Lunch 

Graphic Artist-IMC 

Technician- A/ V 

A/V Aide 

Cataloguer-IMC 

School Physician 

School Physician 

School Physician 

School Nurse 

School Nurse 

School Nurse 

School Nurse 



jular Pay 


Overtime 


10.816.00 


1,313.73 


11,148.80 


1,051.37 


10,816.00 


30.30 


10,816.00 


1,147.66 


10,816.00 


1,147.66 


10,816.00 


660.91 


4,708.00 


532.21 


10,816.00 


377.31 


269.92 




10,816.00 


1,928.56 


10,816.00 


1,039.26 


11,148.80 


148.16 


10,816.00 


132.48 


10,816.00 


174.55 


11,148.80 


163.28 


10,816.00 


518.55 


10,816.00 


249.74 


10.816.00 


15.12 


11,148.80 


880.96 


11,148.80 


238.58 


10,816.00 


210.96 


11,148.80 


1,097.15 


10,816.00 


963.80 


10,816.00 


782.40 


4,848.00 


646.28 


10,816.00 


346.66 


10,816.00 


1,561.17 



Longevity 



15,524.86 

10,030.78 

15,162.06 

7,068.00 

9,275.54 



5,491.17 
1,396.24 
2,172.59 
4,215.06 



179.28 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




-12.00 


12,117.73 




-12.00 


12,188.17 




-203.90 


10,642.40 




-12.00 


11,951.66 




12.00 


11,951.66 




-12.00 


11,464.91 




2,770.80 


8,011.01 




-12.00 


11,181.31 




694.08 


964.00 




-64.15 


12,680.41 




-12.00 


11,843.26 




-12.00 


11,284.96 




-12.00 


10,936.48 




-340.65 


10,650.01 




-12.00 


11,300.08 




-12.00 


11,322.55 




-46.50 


11,019.24 




-12.00 


10,819.12 




-12.00 


12,017.76 




-12.00 


11,375.38 




-12.00 


11,014.96 




-12.00 


12,233.99 




-12.00 


11,767.80 




-12.00 


11,586.40 




-12.00 


5,482.53 




-12.00 


11,150.66 




-64.15 


12,313.02 




7,775.92 


7,775.92 




1,504.00 


1,504.00 




3,200.00 


3,200.00 




1,904.00 


1,904.00 




231.36 


231.36 




3,785.60 


3,785.60 




1,424.00 


1,424.00 




2,156.00 


2,156.00 




3,803.80 


3,803.80 




618.80 


618.80 




218.40 


218.40 




7,581.68 


7,581.68 




2,220.00 


2,220.00 




2,604.00 


2,604.00 




1,984.00 


1,984.00 




1,024.00 


1,024.00 




254.80 


254.80 




1,482.00 


1,482.00 




159.80 


159.80 




21.14 


21.14 




175.16 


175.16 




173.65 


173.65 




543.60 


543.60 




185.49 


185.49 




1,058.24 


1,058.24 




39.75 


39.75 




129.85 


129.85 




407.79 


407.79 




1,343.24 


1,343.24 
15,524.86 
10,030.78 
15,162.06 




-333.20 


6,734.80 
9,275.54 




6,750.00 


6,750.00 




6,750.00 


6,750.00 




6,750.00 


6,750.00 




1,306.49 


6,797.66 




2,290.64 


3,866.16 
2,172.59 
4,215.06 



121 



Position 

School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
School Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub-Nurse 
Sub -Nurse 



Regular Pay 

5.944.41 
2,510.24 
8,352.53 
2,510.24 
3,983.57 
1,976.40 
6,691.68 
10,934.19 
7,970.72 
3,044.21 
2,227.32 



Overtime Longevity 



44.31 



350.88 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




39.44 


5,983.85 




783.00 


3,293.24 




2,011.70 


10,363.23 




192.34 


2,746.89 
3,983.57 




151.20 


2,127.60 
6,691.68 




26.55 


11,311.62 




1,750.85 


9,721.57 




1,137.76 


4,181.97 
227.32 




75.60 


75.60 




324.84 


324.84 




828.00 


828.00 




100.80 


100.80 




75.60 


75.60 




142.38 


142.38 




25.20 


25.20 




299.64 


299.64 




882.00 


882.00 




37.80 


37.80 




1,119.94 


1,119.94 




160.16 


160.16 




126.00 


126.00 



Aides-Library, Teacher, 
Instructional, and 
Substitutes 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 



433.32 



560.09 
2,603.06 
23.08 
65.83 
4,401.21 
4,116.54 
1,596.60 
2,820.66 
3,185.42 

298.22 

30.20 

1,496.25 

1,035.79 

4,705.47 

551.71 
19.63 

726.37 

668.53 
2,510.88 

371.13 
3.824.06 
5,274.77 
2,614.75 
2,727.71 
1,335.05 
1,861.30 
2,016.78 

137.14 

2,433.04 

42.28 

348.83 

974.82 
3,400.45 
1.014.90 
3,966.80 

596.30 
1,188.55 

312.97 
4,367.21 
6,757.45 



560.09 
2,603.06 
23.08 
65.83 
4,401.21 
4,549.86 
1,596.60 
2,820.66 
3,185.42 

298.22 

30.20 

1,496.25 

1,035.79 

4,705.47 

551.71 
19.63 

726.37 

668.53 
2,510.88 

371.13 
3,824.06 
5,274.77 
2,614.75 
2,727.71 
1,335.05 
1,861.30 
2,016.78 

137.14 

2,433.04 

42.28 

348.83 

974.82 
3,400.45 
1,014.90 
3,966.80 

596.30 
1,188.55 

312.97 
4,367.21 
6,757.45 



122 



Position Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 

AiHp 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




330.17 


330.17 




5,133.08 


5,133.08 




3,785.20 


3,785.20 




4,618.23 


4,618.23 




2,686.08 


2,686.08 




2,474.83 


2,474.83 




947.07 


947.07 




3,100.13 


3,100.13 




212.13 


212.13 




4,289.16 


4,289.16 




59.82 


59.82 




52.08 


52.08 




2,576.98 


2,576.98 




3,190.41 


3,190.41 




2,407.28 


2,407.28 




54.67 


54.67 




2,548.94 


2,548.92 




1,931.38 


1,931.38 




2,713.79 


2,713.79 




3,833.84 


3,833.84 




62.67 


62.67 




1,205.67 


1,205.67 




3,974.56 


3,974.56 




1,899.63 


1,899.63 




2,935.28 


2,935.28 




3,160.60 


3,160.60 




24.16 


24.16 




52.36 


52.36 




42.78 


42.78 




58.93 


58.93 




4,222.12 


4,222.12 




906.53 


906.53 




2,504.60 


2,504.60 




3,322.18 


3,322.18 




1,492.50 


1,492.50 




3,672.50 


3,672.50 




1,338.74 


1,338.74 




1,581.40 


1,581.40 




86.81 


86.81 




1,629.01 


1,629.01 




1,329.14 


1,329.14 




959.32 


959.32 




1,365.80 


1,365.80 




4,050.35 


4,050.35 




3,115.29 


3,115.29 




5,242.59 


5,242.59 




5,216.85 


5,216.85 




3,503.33 


3,503.33 




59.26 


59.26 




5,862.50 


5,862.50 




1,334.74 


1,334.74 




2,034.79 


2,034.79 




1,036.70 


1,036.70 




4,546.60 


4,546.60 




350.00 


350.00 




3,508.86 


3,508.86 




1,864.86 


1,864.86 




3,528.15 


3,528.15 




650.27 


650.27 




2,535.93 


2,535.93 




26.42 


26.42 




3,866.63 


3,866.63 




3,243.53 


3,243.53 




2,953.57 


2,953.57 




1,775.57 


1,775.57 




208.20 


208.20 




119.96 


119.96 




2,558.40 


2,558.40 



123 



Position 

Aide 

Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 
Crossing Guards 



Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




2,216.77 


2,216.77 




1,130.50 


1,130.50 




569.50 


569.50 




1,130.50 


1,130.50 




76.56 


76.56 




280.50 


280.50 




340.00 


340.00 




1,130.50 


1,130.50 




459.00 


459.00 




204.00 


204.00 




997.95 


997.95 




569.50 


569.50 




1,130.50 


1,130.50 




1,062.50 


1,062.50 




289.00 


289.00 




2,805.00 


2,805.00 




250.00 


250.00 




170.00 


170.00 




824.50 


824.50 




102.38 


102.38 




500.00 


500.00 




1,589.50 


1,589.50 




595.00 


595.00 




875.50 


875.50 




1,130.50 


1,130.50 




1,130.50 


1,130.50 




170.00 


170.00 




1,079.50 


1,079.50 




2,003.22 


2,003.22 




2,391.00 


2,391.00 




861.06 


861.06 




14.40 


14.40 




2,433.46 


2,433.46 




2,342.55 


2,342.55 




2,445.48 


2,445.48 




2,414.20 


2,414.20 




1,789.71 


1,789.71 




951.15 


951.15 




156.63 


156.63 




180.00 


180.00 




2,343.33 


2,343.33 




1,017.69 


1,017.69 




21.60 


21.60 




2,445.48 


2,445.48 




2,385.01 


2,385.01 



Food Service-Aides, 
Managers, Substitutes 

Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 



7,422.88 



5,507.99 



881.64 


881.64 


37.70 


37.70 


191.40 


191.40 


150.80 


150.80 


-137.42 


7,285.48 


42.78 


42.78 


4,077.72 


4,077.72 


897.55 


897.55 


696.20 


696.20 


84.10 


84.10 


3,979.20 


3,979.20 


186.00 


5,693.99 


3,408.76 


3,408.76 


3,839.58 


3,839.58 


3,870.56 


3,870.56 


1,471.68 


1,471.68 


3,924.36 


3,924.36 


3,294.48 


3,294.48 


3,265.28 


3,265.28 


3,117.72 


3,117.72 


3,712.08 


3,712.08 


561.16 


561.16 



124 



Position 



Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 



Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 



Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
a Aide 
a Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 



Secretary-Food Service 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Manager 
Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Bookkeeper -Food Service 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Manager 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 
Cafeteria Aide 



7,818.80 



6,125.24 
6,412.24 



9,067.02 



6,412.24 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




3,838.64 


3 838.64 




3,648.84 


3,648.84 




3,171.12 


3,171.12 




3,269.20 


3,269.20 




46.40 


46.40 




1,062.76 


1,062.76 




2,339.93 


2,339.93 




3,924.36 


3,924.36 




1,432.84 


1,432.84 




3,226.84 


3,226.84 




3,666.68 


3,666.68 




4,160.08 


4,160.08 




43.50 


43.50 




626.56 


626.56 




1,557.21 


1,557.21 




3,709.68 


3,709.68 




1,830.68 


1,830.68 




1,549.30 


1,549.30 




3,924.36 


3,924.36 




-74.18 


7,744.62 




3,053.52 


3,053.52 




1,353.00 


1,353.00 




3,198.12 


3,198.12 




1,260.00 


1,260.00 




3,400.76 


3,400.76 




382.08 


382.08 




3,206.72 


3,206.72 




2,577.46 


2,577.46 




4,160.08 


4,160.08 




1,910.96 


1,910.96 




997.60 


997.60 




2,084.67 


2,084.67 




3,848.72 


3,848.72 




1,914.32 


1,914.32 




3,892.32 


3,892.32 




3,496.26 


3,496.26 




3,621.38 


3,621.38 




3,964.04 


3,964.04 




2,972.50 


2,972.50 




-1,040.19 


5,085.05 




-390.78 


6,021.46 




3,888.48 


3,888.48 




3,944.68 


3,944.68 




3,836.88 


3,836.88 




268.84 


9,335.86 




1,545.60 


1,545.60 




783.00 


783.00 




3,963.52 


3,963.52 




3,050.52 


3,050.52 




3,938.60 


3,938.60 




3,084.56 


3,084.56 




765.60 


765.60 




1,303.70 


1,303.70 




3,487.56 


3,487.56 




3,938.60 


3,938.60 




2,930.86 


2,930.86 




3,240.54 


3,240.54 




4,076.76 


3,076.76 




-511.73 


5,900.51 




1,370.88 


1,370.88 




100.80 


100.80 




3,203.16 


3,203.16 




82.65 


82.65 




3,970.64 


3,970.64 




3,850.64 


3,850.64 




899.00 


899.00 




3,090.64 


3,090.64 




2,301.21 


2,301.21 



125 



Position 

Cafeteria 
Manager 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Manager 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Manager 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Manager 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Manager 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 
Cafeteria 



Aide 

Aide 
Aide 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 

Aide 
Aide 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 



Department: Police 



Regular Pay 

7,422.88 

7,870.80 

6,412.24 
3,643.38 



Overtime Longevity 



6,034.92 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




403.20 


403.20 




-485.06 


6,937.80 




3,724.00 


3,724.00 




319.24 


319.24 




257.13 


8,127.93 




3,812.88 


3,812.88 




3,984.88 


3,984.88 




939.60 


939.60 




-750.20 


5,662.04 




524.23 


524.23 




3,913.68 


3,913.68 




1,925.61 


1,925.61 




4,462.84 


4,462.84 




201.55 


201.55 




4,102.20 


4,102.20 




3,648.84 


3,648.84 




14.50 


14.50 




346.55 


346.55 




1,667.28 


1,667.28 




669.90 


669.90 




2,323.11 


2,323.11 




214.60 


214.60 




2,512.64 


2,512.64 




1,127.19 


7,162.11 




4,250.32 


4,250.32 




246.50 


246.50 




631.68 


631.68 











Outside 






Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime 


Longevity 


Details 


♦Other 


Gross Pay 


Acting Chief 


$25,446.59 


s 


$1,530.43 


$ 


$2,451.29 


$29,428.31 


Sgt. & Act. Dep. 


21,547.69 


113.70 


2,560.65 




877.41 


25,099.45 


Sgt. & Act. Dep. 


20,951.85 


1,046.04 


1,243.75 




907.61 


24,149.25 


Sergeant 


15,736.03 


3,735.35 


1,904.28 


1,855.08 


774.83 


24,005.57 


Sergeant 


15,736.03 


3,861.75 


1,428.78 


1,476.42 


2,138.45 


24,641.43 


Sergeant 


15,735.94 


6,712.17 


949.91 


1,374.69 


702.22 


25,474.93 


Sergeant 


15,736.03 


5,995.76 


1,428.78 




738.45 


23,899.02 


Sergeant-Acting 


15,735.94 


4,404.61 


114.03 


296.58 


1,083.80 


21,634.96 


Sergeant 


15,736.03 


5,797.80 


952.13 


551.22 


2,102.24 


25,139.42 


Sergeant 


15,736.03 


5,553.21 


476.63 


547.92 


2,174.83 


24,488.62 


Sergeant -Acting 


14,855.03 


7,004.73 


440.73 


1,914.72 


1,104.43 


25,319.64 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


3,752.44 


97.96 


1,341.33 


2,041.81 


20,911.19 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


6,903.00 


414.28 


2,144.55 


641.92 


23,781.40 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


2,089.47 


1,241.69 


1,072.74 


673.42 


18,754.97 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


3,436.35 


827.41 


724.14 


673.42 


19,338.97 


Patrolman 


11,911.08 


4,493.40 




2,835.60 


558.10 


19,798.18 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


5,882.93 


101.12 


2,508.00 


1,398.42 


25,568.12 


Patrolman 


11,913.37 


1,497.83 




845.25 


558.21 


14,814.66 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


2,671.06 




1,068.30 


1,335.31 


18,752.32 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


5,350.67 


414.28 


2,135.88 


1,361.53 


22,940.01 


Patrolman 


11,982.07 


4,217.60 




3,787.74 


591.55 


20,578.96 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


1,141.11 


827.41 


1,309.80 


641.81 


17,597.78 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


5,038.00 


93.22 


1,904.97 


641.92 


21,355.76 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


6,343.35 


91.64 


1,345.20 


1,123.42 


22,581.26 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


714.83 


414.28 


42.00 


1,366.81 


16,215.57 


Patrolman 


2,510.75 


18.26 




309.85 


118.68 


2,957.54 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


231.02 


94.80 




578.70 


14,582.17 


Patrolman 


13,064.47 


4,748.44 




2,283.60 


1,327.86 


21,424.37 


Patrolman 


5,929.41 


129.11 


597.24 




316.20 


6,971.96 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


7,173.74 


1,654.82 


937.08 


641.81 


24,085.10 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


1,794.41 


1,241.69 


852.42 


641.92 


18.208.09 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


7,064.48 


94.80 


4,063.33 


673.42 


25,573.68 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


7,484.28 


825.19 


4,328.22 


668.14 


26,983.48 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


3,331.30 


1,241.69 


2,765.28 


610.20 


21,626.12 


Patrolman 


13,677.65 


869.54 


1,241.69 


42.00 


610.31 


16,441.19 


•Holidays & Education 


Incentive 













126 



Position 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Patrolman 

Chief (Retired) 

Chief (Retired) 

Senior Clerk 

Senior Clerk 

Senior Clerk 

Junior Clerk 

Junior Clerk 

Custodian 

Matron 

Matron 

Matron 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

Intermittent Ptlm. 

""Holidays & Education Incentive 









Outside 






egular Pay 


Overtime 


Longevity 


Details 


*Other 


Gross Pay 


$13,677.65 


$6,269.01 


$ 414.28 


$2,978.79 


$ 641.81 


$23,981.54 


12,339.70 


5,841.53 




2,994.96 


996.75 


22,172.94 


12,463.66 


2,156.16 






607.58 


15,227.40 


13,677.65 


6,799.05 


825.19 


2,534.28 


673.42 


24,509.59 


11,908.79 


4,640.23 




2,639.31 


558.10 


19,746.43 


12,654.65 


6,826.61 




2,371.14 


592.97 


22,445.37 


13,677.65 


8,160.35 


826.77 


3,767.97 


673.42 


27,106.16 


13,677.65 


48.11 


1,241.69 




578.70 


15,546.15 


13,677.65 


8,511.54 




3,126.12 


673.42 


25,988.73 


13,677.65 


6,489.20 


414.28 


3,759.93 


610.20 


24,951.26 


11,525.15 




370.04 




473.70 
3,990.00 


12,368.89 
3,990.00 


13,572.65 


7,136.69 


422.18 


3,422.10 


913.42 


25,467.04 


13,677.65 


8,138.02 


827.41 


2,419.38 


1,335.31 


26,397.77 


13,677.65 


6,650.35 


827.41 


2,416.77 


1,091.81 


24,663.99 


12,291.46 


5,950.72 




2,038.86 


994.46 


21,275.50 


527.07 








1,616.79 
14,124.94 


2,143.86 
14,124.94 


4,657.50 










4,657.50 


9,798.58 


32.16 








9,830.74 


9,773.60 










9,773.60 


3,653.10 










3,653.10 


3,504.60 










3,504.60 


9,114.56 






267.91 
199.60 
388.60 
446.41 
231.10 
341.35 
199.60 
42.00 
409.60 


760.48 

69.45 

854.23 


9,114.56 
760.48 

69.45 
854.23 
267.91 
199.60 
388.60 
446.41 
231.10 
341.35 
199.60 

42.00 
409.60 



Department: Youth Center 



Position 

Coordinator 
Chief Supervisor 
P.T. Clerk 
P.T. Supervisor 
P.T. Supervisor 
P.T. Supervisor 
P.T. Supervisor 
P.T. Supervisor 
P.T. Supervisor 
P.T. Supervisor 
P.T. Supervisor 



Regular Pay 

12,422.91 

5,119.36 

2,102.97 

2,090.50 

712.80 

455.40 

1,204.00 

330.00 

422.40 

290.40 

184.80 



Overtime Longevity 



Outside 
Details 



Other 



Gross Pay 

12,422.91 

5,119.36 

2,102.97 

2,090.50 

712.80 

455.40 

1,204.00 

330.00 

422.40 

290.40 

184.80 



Department: Chelmsford Assessors 



Position 

Assessor — Full time 
Assessor — Part time 
Assessor — Part time 
Admin. Ass't. 
Senior Clerk 
Senior Clerk 
Jr. Clerk 



Regular Pay 

18,086.69 
4,342.42 
4,342.42 

10,916.73 
9,831.30 
8,485.97 
2,138.40 



Overtime Longevity 



Outside 
Details 



Other 



Gross Pay 

18,086.69 
4,342.42 
4,342.42 

10,916.73 
9,831.30 
8,485.97 
2,138.40 



127 



Department: Elections 



Position Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 

Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Clerk 



Outside 






Details 


Other 


Gross Pay 




1 21.75 


$ 21.75 




20.20 


20.30 




24.65 


24.65 




8.70 


8.70 




74.05 


74.05 




8.70 


8.70 




20. SO 


20.30 




23.20 


23.20 




74.05 


74.05 




10.15 


10.15 




24.65 


24.65 




24.65 


24.65 




8.70 


8.70 




10.15 


10.15 




8.70 


8.70 




20.30 


20.30 




20.30 


20.30 




11.60 


11.60 




21.75 


21.75 




67.68 


67.68 




8.70 


8.70 




8.70 


8.70 




24.65 


24.65 




20.30 


20.30 




26.10 


26.10 




20.30 


20.30 




24.65 


24.65 




65.80 


65.80 




24.65 


24.65 




11.60 


11.60 




72.10 


72.10 




13.05 


13.05 




8.70 


8.70 




10.15 


10.15 




10.15 


10.15 




21.75 


21.75 




64.35 


64.35 




11.60 


11.60 




213.68 


213.68 




20.30 


20.30 




24.65 


24.65 




24.65 


24.65 




10.15 


10.15 




70.20 


70.20 




24.65 


24.65 




10.15 


10.15 




5.80 


5.80 




8.70 


8.70 




24.65 


24.65 




24.65 


24.65 




20.30 


20.30 




8.70 


8.70 




8.70 


8.70 




10.15 


10.15 




10.15 


10.15 




10.15 


10.15 




8.70 


8.70 




63.75 


63.75 




20.30 


20.30 




24.65 


24.65 




8.70 


8.70 




8.70 


8.70 




10.15 


10.15 




21.75 


21.75 




10.15 


10.15 




10.15 


10.15 



128 

Outside 
Position Regular Pay Overtime Longevity Details 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 



Other 


Gross Pay 


74.05 


74.05 


21.75 


21.75 


8.70 


8.70 


10.15 


10.15 


66.30 


66.30 


24.65 


24.65 


20.30 


20.30 


8.70 


8.70 


21.75 


21.75 


21.75 


21.75 


20.30 


20.30 


65.63 


65.63 


10.15 


10.15 


68.20 


68.20 


10.15 


10.15 


21.75 


21.75 


8.70 


8.70 


21.75 


21.75 


67.50 


67.50 


20.30 


20.30 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


10.15 


10.15 


10.15 


10.15 


24.65 


24.65 


8.70 


8.70 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


8.70 


8.70 


20.30 


20.30 


53.62 


53.62 


196.95 


196.95 


151.13 


151.13 


8.70 


8.70 


20.30 


20.30 


8.70 


8.70 


24.65 


24.65 


13.05 


13.05 


20.30 


20.30 


24.65 


24.65 


8.70 


8.70 


11.60 


11.60 


24.65 


24.65 


13.05 


13.05 


24.65 


24.65 


10.15 


10.15 


10.15 


10.15 


8.70 


8.70 


73.30 


73.30 


10.15 


10.15 


24.65 


24.65 


10.15 


10.15 


24.65 


24.65 


13.05 


13.05 


13.05 


13.05 


10.15 


10.15 


8.70 


8.70 


65.63 


65.63 


10.15 


10.15 


8.70 


8.70 


65.63 


65.63 


65.63 


65.63 


74.05 


74.05 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


20.30 


20.30 


24.65 


24.65 


74.05 


74.05 



129 



Position 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 



Regular Pay Overtime Longevity 



Outside 
Details 



Other 


Gross Pay 


236.43 


236.43 


27.55 


27.55 


10.15 


10.15 


20.30 


20.30 


21.75 


21.75 


5.80 


5.80 


189.86 


189.86 


10.15 


10.15 


10.15 


10.15 


8.70 


8.70 


65.63 


65.63 


11.60 


11.60 


24.65 


24.65 


70.20 


70.20 


8.70 


8.70 


21.75 


21.75 


10.15 


10.15 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


24.65 


60.00 


60.00 


24.65 


24.65 


36.25 


36.25 


20.30 


20.30 


10.15 


10.15 


20.30 


20.30 


20.30 


20.30 


21.75 


21.75 


8.70 


8.70 


24.65 


24.65 



Department: Veterans' Services 



Position 

Veterans' Agent 
Senior Clerk 



Regular Pay 

13,446.59 
9,831.30 



Overtime Longevity 



Outside 
Details 



Other 



Gross Pay 

13,446.59 
9.831.30 



Department: Cemetery 



Position 

Superintendent 
Foreman 

Backhoe Operator 
Truck Driver 
Landscape Gardener 
Laborer, Part Time 
Laborer, Part Time 
Laborer, Part Time 
Laborer, Part Time 
Secretary 
Commissioner 
Commissioner 
Commissioner 



Regular Pay 

16,591.53 

12,300.00 

12,480.00 

10,309.44 

9,466.80 

2,504.88 

3,281.04 

2,134.44 

640.00 

1,722.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 



Overtime Longevity 

2,033.42 
1,650.00 
1,766.74 
1,566.34 



Outside 
Details 



Other 



Gross Pay 

16,591.53 

14,333.42 

14,130.00 

12,076.18 

11,033.14 

2,504.88 

3,281.04 

2,134.44 

640.00 

1,722.00 

100. Q0 

100.00 

100.00 



Department: Health 



Position 

Chairman 
Board member 
Board member 
Director 
Inspector 
Sr. Clerk 
Town Doctor 
Town Veterinarian 



Regular Pay 

310.00 

286.00 

301.00 

21,835.14 

11,797.67 

9,263.25 

1,000.00 

500.00 



Overtime Longevity 



Outside 
Details 



Other 



Gross Pay 

310.00 

286.00 

301.00 

21,835.14 

11,797.67 

9.263.25 

1,000.00 

500.00 



Department: Fire 



130 



Position 

Chief 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Captain 

Captain 

Captain 

Captain 



refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 
refighter 

Clerk 

Mechanic 









Outside 




;ular Pay 


Overtime 


Longevity Details Other 


Gross Pay 


28,504.00 




3,310.13 


1,206.53 


33,020.66 


23 


940.00 




2,873.00 


1,012.88 


27,826.68 


14 


607.83 


3,591.77 


1,752.71 


685.10 


20,637.41 


16 


395.65 


6,035.63 


983.84 


938.20 


24,353.32 


16 


395.65 


9,215.64 


724.35 


938.20 


27,273.84 


16 


395.65 


5,180.32 


983.84 


1,088.25 


23,648.06 


16 


395.65 


5,967.79 


491.40 


1,538.25 


24,393.09 


14 


250.62 


3,168.72 


427.44 


685.10 


18,531.88 


14 


250.62 


3,577.52 


292.62 


1,060.10 


19,180.76 


14 


250.62 


1,998.00 


1,709.76 


685.10 


18,643.48 


13 


465.66 


3,968.62 




1,120.22 


18,554.40 


13 


688.95 


3,217.29 




672.61 


17,578.85 


14 


250.62 


3,403.44 


1,282.32 


685.10 


19,621.48 


14 


250.62 


4,029.36 


427.44 


835.10 


19,452.52 


14 


250.62 


3,799.53 


854.88 


685.10 


19,590.13 


14 


250.62 


3,667.50 


427.44 


685.10 


19,030.66 


14 


250.62 


2,552.58 


1,486.19 


685.10 


18,974.49 


14 


250.62 


4,107.60 


1,282.32 


685.10 


20,325.64 


13 


688.95 


3,721.53 




1,032.61 


18,443.09 


14 


250.62 


3,997.13 


427.44 


1,135.10 


19,810.29 


13 


465.66 


3,363.38 




648.10 


17,477.14 


13 


287.91 


2,048.31 




639.78 


15,976.00 


14 


250.62 


3,520.80 


1,709.76 


685.10 


20,166.28 


14 


250.62 


3,838.69 


427.44 


685.10 


19,201.85 


13 


688.95 


3,041.35 




657.51 


17,387.81 


14 


250.62 


1,887.54 


854.88 


685.10 


17,678.14 


14 


250.62 


3,491.46 


854.88 


685.10 


19,282.06 


14 


250.62 


3,662.61 


629.64 


820.10 


19,362.97 


14 


250.62 


2,542.83 


1,709.76 


685.10 


19,188.31 


14 


250.62 


2,247.39 


1,709.76 


685.10 


18,892.87 


14 


250.62 


3,434.70 


292.62 


1,105.10 


19,083.04 


14 


250.62 


3,290.97 


854.88 


685.10 


19,081.53 


14 


250.62 


2,875.32 


854.88 


685.10 


18,665.92 


14 


250.62 


3,324.78 


1,282.32 


685.10 


19,542.82 


14 


250.62 




427.44 


685.10 


15,363.16 


14 


250.62 


1,770.18 


854.88 


685.10 


17,560.78 


14 


250.62 


841.08 


629.64 


685.10 


16,406.44 


14 


250.62 


3,452.34 


752.92 


685.10 


19.140.98 


14 


250.62 


2,586.81 


427.44 


685.10 


17,949.97 


14 


250.62 


3,995.13 


854.88 


685.10 


19,785.73 


14 


250.62 


3,331.44 


752.92 


685.10 


19,020.08 


14 


250.62 


3,418.11 


1,567.55 


685.10 


19,921.38 


14 


250.62 


3,745.74 


629.64 


685.10 


19,311.10 


13 


688.95 


2,818.15 




657.51 


17,164.61 


14 


250.62 


3,794.64 


854.88 


985.10 


19,885.25 


13 


688.95 


3,294.38 




657.51 


17,640.84 


13 


688.95 


3,428.08 




1,107.51 


18,224.54 


14 


250.62 


3,357.42 


1,282.32 


685.10 


19,575.46 


14 


250.62 


4,269.48 


292.62 


685.10 


19,497.82 


13 


465.66 


3,514.76 




1,075.22 


18,055.64 


13 


688.95 


3,577.02 




927.51 


18,190.48 


14 


250.62 


2,699.28 


427.44 


685.10 


18,062.44 


14 


250.62 


3,589.26 


1,709.76 


685.10 


20,234.74 


1 


534.16 








1,534.16 


14 


250.62 


3,819.81 


1,485.47 


685.10 


20,241.00 


14 


250.62 


1,907.10 


854.88 


685.10 


17,697.70 


14 


250.62 


3,520.80 


427.44 


685.10 


18,883.96 


14 


250.62 


4,039.14 


1,282.32 


685.10 


20,257.18 


14 


250.62 


2,914.44 


1,282.32 


685.10 


19,132.48 


14 


250.62 


3,837.06 


292.62 


685.10 


19,065.40 


13 


700.90 


3,395.22 




957.61 


18,053.73 


9 


809.69 




318.35 




10,128.04 


13 


088.64 


386.83 






13,475.47 



131 



Position 

Superintendent of Streets 

Aministrative Assistant 

Foreman 

Foreman 

Clerk 

Grader Operator 

Mechanic, Heavy Equipment 

Mechanic, Heavy Equipment 

Class I - Engineering Equipment Op. 

Engineering Equipment Op. 

Engineering Equipment Op. 

Engineering Equipment 



Class I 

Class I 

Class I 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Class II 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 



- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (H'way 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (H'way 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (H'way 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (H'way 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (H'way 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (H'way 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (H'way 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (Waste 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (Waste 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (Waste 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (Waste 

- Special Eq. Op. Tr. Dr. (Waste 
Skilled 
Skilled 
Skilled 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
General 

• General 

• General 
■ General 

• General 

• General 

• General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- General 

- Seasonal 

- Seasonal 

- Seasonal 

- Seasonal 

- Seasonal 

- Seasonal 

- Seasonal 

Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 



Regular Pay 


Overtime 


$21,834.80 


$ 65,20 


11,250.21 


41.33 


15,466.56 


3,849.49 


14,848.60 


3,510.16 


2,824.46 




13,000.00 


3,119.24 


11,407.68 


3,625.71 


12,710.40 


4,304.28 


12,490.00 


1,135.67 


12,428.16 


2,301.77 


12,198.00 


1,662.30 


12,480.00 


507.92 


11,481.60 


2,684.58 


11,391.56 


2,441.10 


11,702.04 


1,220.45 


1,192.32 


91.94 


11,203.32 


2,358.36 


11,481.60 


1,706.02 


11,473.32 


1,733.02 


11,481.60 


1,211.08 


9,141.12 


1,121.42 


11,481.60 


1,101.85 


5,608.32 


828.55 


11,481.60 


1,162.06 


11,122.86 


1,484.58 


9,703.40 


748.17 


9,925.67 


1,821.69 


7,877.44 


412.28 


1,988.48 




9,942.40 


947.64 


7,318.06 


308.31 


2,103.20 




7,753.16 


423.03 


1,912.00 




1,873.76 




9,942.40 


1,067.14 


1,950.24 




11,412.77 


3,012.81 


9,628.01 


1,360.31 


9,471.05 


902.78 


10,910.44 


1,037.65 


11,141.52 


1,182.34 


9,309.60 


1,195.16 


5,899.52 


193.59 


9,699.96 


1,581.86 


7,659.15 


1,406.84 


9,370.97 


1,330.55 


10,039.12 


1,372.28 


7,463.56 


297.56 


7,787.08 


. 310.85 


1,974.92 




10,334.83 


1,463.16 


8,757.76 


1,052.90 


9,682.44 


1,053.82 


9,710.67 


800.17 


1,073.96 




1,851.84 


1,851.84 


2,231.44 




1,940.40 




1,998.72 




955.04 




1,923.16 




1,647.96 




1,051.60 


390.77 


3,978.28 


139.82 


5,862.49 


865.25 


1,597.24 


157.27 


1,223.68 


414.67 


2,598.72 


92.16 



Other 



Gross Pay 

$21,900.00 

11,291.54 

19,296.05 

18,358.76 

2,824.46 

16,119.24 

15,033.39 

17,014.68 

13,625.67 

14,729.93 

13,860.30 

12,987.92 

14,166.92 

13,832.66 

12,922.49 

1,284.26 

13,561.68 

13,187.62 

13,206.34 

12,692.68 

10,262.54 

12,583.45 

6,436.87 

12,643.66 

12,607.44 

10,541.57 

11,747.36 

8,289.72 

1,988.48 

10,890.04 

7,626.37 

2,103.20 

8,176.19 

1,912.00 

1,873.76 

11,009.54 

1,950.24 

14,425.58 

10,988.32 

10,373.83 

11,948.09 

12,323.86 

10,504.76 

6,093.11 

11,281.82 

9,056.99 

10,701.52 

11,411.40 

7,761.12 

8,097.93 

1.974.92 

11,797.99 

9,810.66 

10,736.26 

10,510.84 

1,073.96 

2,231.44 
1,940.40 
1,998.72 
955.04 
1,923.16 
1,647.96 
1,442.37 
4,118.10 
6,691.74 
1,754.51 
1.638.35 
2,690.88 



132 



Position 

Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 
Terminated Employees & Retroactive Pay 



Regular Pay 


Overtime 


2,265.50 


687.54 


2,064.96 


21.51 


51.47 




219.25 




89.28 




1.07 




56.88 




111.64 




21.12 




19.12 




88.11 




52.34 




65.55 




19.89 




62.14 





Other 



Gross Pay 

2,953.04 

2,086.47 

51.47 

219.25 

89.28 

1.07 

56.88 

111.64 

21.12 

19.12 

88.11 

52.34 

65.55 

19.89 

62.14 



INDEX 

Application for Appointment to Town Committees 133 

Appointed Town Officials 76 

Board of Appeals 88 

Board of Assessors 57 

Board of Registrars 61 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Cable Television Advisory Committee 88 

Celebrations Committee 88 

Cemetery Commission 57 

Civil Defense Commission 89 

Committee to Update Town History 90 

Conservation Commission 90 

Council on Aging 89 

Department of Veteran's Services 100 

Dog Officer 91 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Fire Department 84 

Gas Inspector 83 

General Information 2 

Health Department 58 

Highway Department 83 

Historical Commission 91 

Historic District Commission 92 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 93 

Housing Authority 59 

Industrial Commission 94 

Insect Pest Control 94 

Inspector of Animals 87 

Inspector of Buildings 82 

Memorial Day Committee 94 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 95 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 96 

Park Department 60 

Planning Board 60 

Plumbing Inspector 82 

Police Department 85 

Police — Auxiliary 88 

Public Libraries 59 

Recreation Commission 99 

School Building Committee 75 

School Committee 62 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 98 

Sewer Commission 75 

Sign Advisory Committee 99 

Town Accountant 77 

Town Aide 99 

Town Clerk 7 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting February 1 , 1979 7 

Special Town Meeting February 1 , 1979 9 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 9, 1979 and April 30, 1979 11 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting May 14, 1979 24 

Results Annual Town Election April 7, 1979 25 

Annual Town Meeting April 30, 1979 27 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 3, 1979 32 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 7, 1979 37 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 10, 1979 40 

Special Town Meeting May 14, 1979 40 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 21 , 1979 43 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting October 15, 1979 50 

Special Town Meeting October 15, 1979 52 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting December 13, 1979 54 

Special Town Meeting December 13, 1979 56 



Town Directory Back 

Cover 

Town Employees' Salaries 103 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 76 

Tree Department 75 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 100 

Wire Inspector 83 

Youth Center Advisory Committee 101 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN HALL 

1 NORTH ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please fill out this form 
and mail to: Administrative Assistant, Board of Selectmen, Town Hall, Chelmsford, 
Massachusetts 01824. The filling out of this form in no way assures appointment. All com- 
mittee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular 
capacity. 

NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE 

ADDRESS AMT. OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS 



This report was prepared from individual inputs from all Town departments and 
committees and coordinated by the Finance Committee. The funds, $8,000. were 
appropriated at the 1979 Annual Town Meeting as line item 260 under Unclassified 
Departments. Each booklet cost $1.56. 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting: 256-3621 

Assessors: 256-2031 

Board of Appeals Clerk: 256-6400 

Building Inspector: 256-8346 

(Yard Sales, Kennel Permits & Bldg Permits) 

Cemetery Garage: 256-8671 

Chamber of Commerce —Chelmsford: 256-3063 

20 Chelmsford St. (Wed. only) 
Community Teamwork: 459-0551 
Conservation Commission (Town Hall): 256-6151 
Council on Aging: 256-0013 Clerk: 256-5737 
Dog Officer: 256-5340 (Police Station: 256-0754) 
Fire Department: 256-2543 
Gas Inspector: 256-8347 
Health Department: 256-2061 
Highway Department: 256-2161 

Garage: 251-4841 
High School, Richardson Rd.: 251-8792 
Housing Authority 256-7425 
Housing for the Elderly, 1 Smith St.: 256-7425 
Libraries: Adams-256-5521 ; McKay -25 1-32 12 
Mass. Electric: 458-1431 
Park Department Garage: 256-5073 
Planning Board Clerk: 256-7897 
Plumbing Inspector: 453-2746 
Police Department: 256-2521 
Post Office: 256-2361 
Recreation Comm: 256-1588 
Registry of Deeds: 458-8474 
Registry of Motor Vehicles: 459-9397 
School Dept., 31 Princeton St.: 251-4961 
Selectmen: 256-2441 
Town Aide: 256-0013 or 256-6632 
Town Clerk: 256-4104 



Treasurer/Tax Collector: 256-2122 

Veterans Agent: 256-8713 (Draft Cards) 

Water Department: 256-2381 

Welcome Wagon: 251-2551 

Welfare: 256-2731 

Wiring Inspector: 256-8347 

Youth Center: 256-7849 

24-hr Juror Hot Line (Toll Free): 800-792-5117 

POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS: 

Precinct 1: Center School, Billerica Rd. 

Precinct 2: No. Elementary School, Groton Rd. 

Precinct 3: Moses Parker Jr. High, Graniteville Rd. 

Precinct 4: East School, Carlisle St. 

Precinct 5: Byam School, Maple Rd. 

Precinct 6: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 

Precinct 7: North Elementary School, Groton Rd. 

Precinct 8: McCarthy Jr. High 

Precinct 9: So. Row School, Boston Rd. 

Precinct 10: So. Row School, Boston Rd. 

Precinct 11: Westlands School, Dalton Rd. 

Precinct 12: Fire House, Old Westford Rd. 

Senator Edward Kennedy & Senator Paul Tsongas 

JFK Federal Building, Government Center 02203 

Rep. Bruce Freeman: State House, Boston 02133 

Office: 1 727 2550 

Home: 7 Kenwood St., Chelmsford, MA 01824 256-2944 

Senator Carol Amick: State House, Boston 

Office: 1-727-2571 

Home: 18 Crescent Ave., Bedford, MA 

Congressman James M. Shannon: 459-2600 

142 East Haverhill St., Lawrence, MA 

Middlesex County Commissioners: 1-494 4100 

Superior Courthouse, E. Cambridge, MA 02141